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During the 1920s Foster Yeoman purchased 150  Gloucester R C & W, five plank wagons to a 12t design, they carried  Foster Yeoman livery. GWR owned vehicles were also used. Some of the output went to the South and South East. 

 

cheers.  

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Kent isn't a major stone quarrying area. Its traditional high-quality building stone was ragstone, which is a grey limestone, and sandstone was used in the areas where decent-quality stuff outcrops, notably around Tunbridge Wells, and along the Kent-Sussex border.

 

I'm not as "well up" on industrial railways in Kent as I am on East Sussex, but off-hand I'm not aware of any of the ragstone quarries being rail-connected. I'll keep looking for private sidings in the 1935 Sectional appendix, but the only one so far is at Westbere between Sturry and Grove Ferry, which took SR engineer's department wagons, I think to collect river terrace gravel for use as ballast, plus all the various shingle pits in the Dungeness area.

 

Gravel, shingle (no sand), and 'beach' (mixed shingle and sand) was ideally carried in drop-sided wagons, but if you look at pictures of the Dungeness area I think you will find all sorts of general-purpose open wagons, including old "bedstead" ones in use for the traffic at your date. (If modelling this, remember that these are very dense loads, so probably not loaded more than 3 or 4 planks up)

 

Lime and chalk were also carried in open wagons.

 

There was a fair bit of concrete-product manufacture in Kent too, so you might see "patent stone" products being transported too.

 

Slate was almost certainly still coming by rail at that period, and there is a separate thread (or is it buried in a pre-grouping wagon-loads discussion?) covering that.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Nearholmer
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To add: the SR itself was a huge user of imported stone in Kent in the 1930s, because of the big re-ballasting programme started in the wake of the Sevenoaks derailment, where traditional shingle ballast came under an unfavourable light. That stone came from Meldon Quarry, in bogie hopper wagons designed for the job.

 

Imported high-quality building stone, as opposed to broken stone, would probably have come in the low-sided open wagons specially built for that sort of load, some of which were PO, others railway owned. Good item about an LSWR one here https://farthinglayouts.blogspot.com/2015/05/lswr-stone-wagon.html

 

 

 

 

Edited by Nearholmer
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It's for a light railway with a link to a quarry. The railway itself was the unconstructed extension of the KESR, but my layout is an interpretation of what could have been built

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Well, you could be in the right geology for a rag stone quarry once you get up near Maidstone https://www.gallagher-group.co.uk/kentish-ragstone-geology

 

I suggest low-sided wagons for dressed stone, and 3 or 4 plank for broken stone, if you are to have special-purpose wagons.

 

Here’s a health and safety nightmare from the right time and locale https://www.alamy.com/quarrying-kentish-ragstone-in-tovil-kent-1936-image359775405.html

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4 hours ago, Nearholmer said:

Well, you could be in the right geology for a rag stone quarry once you get up near Maidstone https://www.gallagher-group.co.uk/kentish-ragstone-geology

 

I suggest low-sided wagons for dressed stone, and 3 or 4 plank for broken stone, if you are to have special-purpose wagons.

 

Here’s a health and safety nightmare from the right time and locale https://www.alamy.com/quarrying-kentish-ragstone-in-tovil-kent-1936-image359775405.html

Funnily enough my light railway runs from Maidstone and through Tovil out to Chart Sutton, with a branch to Boughton quarry

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Then there's tarred stone for roadmaking : mucky stuff that you wouldn't want to put anything in a wagon after - so superannuated wagons that'll be pensioned off after a few trips ( there are examples in the SR Wagons books ) or Private Owner wagons built for the purpose e.g. Tarmac.

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Being a sad fellow, I did google around yesterday trying to discover whether highways in Kent at this period were made from tarred stone, or whether they were still at the stage of spraying tar over a dry road-surface to stabilise it, and the answer is "dunno".

 

Pre-WW1, I found extracts of council minutes that are very clearly about over-spraying, and post-WW2 they were certainly using tarred stone on main highways. I think tarred-stone probably came into use on main roads between the wars, when there were upgrades of things like the A1 and A21, but "a dribble of tar, and a dressing of grit" was still in-use on residential and minor roads into the 1960s (I remember seeing it being done, and in East Sussex they were still using pea-shingle, designed to make you fall off your bike, until c1970 - [email protected]@dy awful stuff!). And, even now there a few "grass down the middle" very minor highways in rural Kent that don't look as if they've been resurfaced since WW2. 

 

A tarred-stone plant would allow some interesting tank wagons. South Eastern Tar Distillers had horrible stinky plants at Tonbridge, Canterbury, Rye Harbour, and maybe a couple of other places, and years (decades!) ago there was a drawing of one of their tank wagons in one of the modelling magazines, liveried under their previous name of Forbes, Abbott, and Leonard (these three guys practically invented the tar distilling industry, and had huge plants in London too). [It looks as if Dapol make a rectangular tank wagon in S-E TD livery, although whether the model is accurate, I don't know.]

 

I told you I was sad!

 

 

 

 

Edited by Nearholmer
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7 hours ago, Nearholmer said:

Being a sad fellow, I did google around yesterday trying to discover whether highways in Kent at this period were made from tarred stone, or whether they were still at the stage of spraying tar over a dry road-surface to stabilise it, and the answer is "dunno".

 

Pre-WW1, I found extracts of council minutes that are very clearly about over-spraying, and post-WW2 they were certainly using tarred stone on main highways. I think tarred-stone probably came into use on main roads between the wars, when there were upgrades of things like the A1 and A21, but "a dribble of tar, and a dressing of grit" was still in-use on residential and minor roads into the 1960s (I remember seeing it being done, and in East Sussex they were still using pea-shingle, designed to make you fall off your bike, until c1970 - [email protected]@dy awful stuff!). And, even now there a few "grass down the middle" very minor highways in rural Kent that don't look as if they've been resurfaced since WW2. 

 

A tarred-stone plant would allow some interesting tank wagons. South Eastern Tar Distillers had horrible stinky plants at Tonbridge, Canterbury, Rye Harbour, and maybe a couple of other places, and years (decades!) ago there was a drawing of one of their tank wagons in one of the modelling magazines, liveried under their previous name of Forbes, Abbott, and Leonard (these three guys practically invented the tar distilling industry, and had huge plants in London too). [It looks as if Dapol make a rectangular tank wagon in S-E TD livery, although whether the model is accurate, I don't know.]

 

I told you I was sad!

 

 

 

 

Being a Kentish Maid currently exiled in East Sussex I know all about those awful pea shingle roads and pavements!

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