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Across the yard.


Worsdell forever
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I was going to do one of those Great Western Iron Mink-inspired gunpowder vans - perhaps a LNWR one - until I realised they came in three or four years after my c. 1902 target period. You know what expletive came to mind: blast!

 

Your diagram G1 covered goods wagon has a roof door that appears to go right the way across. Was that common / standard? (I built mine a very long time ago.)

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1 hour ago, Compound2632 said:

Your diagram G1 covered goods wagon has a roof door that appears to go right the way across. Was that common / standard? (I built mine a very long time ago.)

 

As far as I'm aware the canvas roof was both sides, I've a feeling they sort of rolled up, if they had a sliding steel door they only had them on one side. 

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Please excuse an appeal for help.

One of my current projects is a former NER Dia 85 six-wheeled Inspection Saloon, as drawn in NERA's 'Diagrams of Passenger Train Vehicles' Book No.2.

I have described this    ....here....which also links into my modelling thread.

In the absence of more detail, I think I may have to make a 'reasonable guess' as to it's heating, lighting, and braking arrangements in the early 1930s.

Would you have any  better information?

 

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26 minutes ago, drmditch said:

Please excuse an appeal for help.

One of my current projects is a former NER Dia 85 six-wheeled Inspection Saloon, as drawn in NERA's 'Diagrams of Passenger Train Vehicles' Book No.2.

I have described this    ....here....which also links into my modelling thread.

In the absence of more detail, I think I may have to make a 'reasonable guess' as to it's heating, lighting, and braking arrangements in the early 1930s.

Would you have any  better information?

 

 

Not really that up on passenger stock, I would have thought it would still been Westinghouse braked in the early '30s, also most likely gas for lighting and with steam heating. But, there's a photo in the NERA archive (need to be a member to view) of 23271 in LNER livery at Darlington Bank Top that's vac fitted only but with what look like gas lamp tops. 

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27 minutes ago, Worsdell forever said:

 

Not really that up on passenger stock, I would have thought it would still been Westinghouse braked in the early '30s, also most likely gas for lighting and with steam heating. But, there's a photo in the NERA archive (need to be a member to view) of 23271 in LNER livery at Darlington Bank Top that's vac fitted only but with what look like gas lamp tops. 

Thank you. I am indeed a NERA member, but I haven't worked out how to view items in the archive. Help!

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3 minutes ago, drmditch said:

Thank you. I am indeed a NERA member, but I haven't worked out how to view items in the archive. Help!

 

You need to go to 'members area' on the website to log in, there should be a contact on there if you're struggling.

 

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1 hour ago, Compound2632 said:

 

Should not have been consigned to this station. Someone's going to get a rocket for not consulting the RCH Handbook of Stations.

 

I'm hoping the station pilot will be over to take it to the dock over at the passenger station when it's available, think there's a horsebox in there at the moment. 

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26 minutes ago, MrWolf said:

Great little scene. What's the origins of the loco?

 

It's an NER class H, LNER Y7. mostly used around Tyne Dock and Alexandra dock, Hull. Many were sold into industry and 2 are preserved. https://www.lner.info/locos/Y/y7.php

 

The model is an Alexander kit with a High Level gearbox. It's a cracking kit and it would be great to see them out again.

 

20211201_190014_copy_1600x910.jpg.ed0e80ea35053d86bad34ccd418a436d.jpg

 

20211201_185910_copy_1327x910.jpg.8598e756985437fe1185d954ab345fcb.jpg

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There is also a 4mm Nucast version I had one, and sold it on when I managed to obtain a 4mm Connessieur etched version, mine also is running with a High Level box  . Much nicer than the old Nucast castings version.

 

Your Alexander looks excellent too . a great shame no one has taken the Alexander range on so far .

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2 hours ago, micklner said:

There is also a 4mm Nucast version I had one, and sold it on when I managed to obtain a 4mm Connessieur etched version, mine also is running with a High Level box  . Much nicer than the old Nucast castings version.

 

Your Alexander looks excellent too . a great shame no one has taken the Alexander range on so far .

 

I also have a Connoisseur one, built many years ago, it suffered a bit of damage a few years ago and unfortunately has so far resisted being straightened.

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13 hours ago, Worsdell forever said:

No. 44, having just entered service (I fitted DCC just the other night) has attracted the attention of celebrated local railway photographer Col. Watson Meadows, retd. 

 

The Colonel wants to work a little on his depth of field - a smaller aperture and longer exposure time, to take best advantage of the resolution possible with his big glass plates.

 

But I do like photos taken from a scale 4ft off the ground - they add no end to the suspension of disbelief. 

  

38 minutes ago, Worsdell forever said:

even the milkman. Hope he's got enough glass plates with him. 

 

Glass bottles, surely? My parents had some glass plates - until the day my father forgot to put them out and served the dinner straight onto the table.

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6 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

 

The Colonel wants to work a little on his depth of field - a smaller aperture and longer exposure time, to take best advantage of the resolution possible with his big glass plates.

 

But I do like photos taken from a scale 4ft off the ground - they add no end to the suspension of disbelief. 

 

I wish they all had cameras like his back then, you can see the lining, as we know, red usually disappears on black locos ... There's only so much the lens and software on the phone can do.

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