Jump to content

Granton Gasworks , Edinburgh- 2mmFS project


Recommended Posts

I have been working on this project for the last year so I thought it about time to start a blog.

 

The gasworks in Granton Edinburgh were built around 1900.

The site was chosen so that there was easy rail access from the Caledonian Granton branch.

In addition to ensure that there was always adequate coal supply a small branch was made to NB sidings.

 

The works was quite unique in that it had its own private station.

This building still stands and was largely the motivation behind choosing this project.

 

The works were large and complex so the plan is just to model the Eastern half of the site including the CR branch.

 

I am a previous N gauge  modeller so there is a steep learning curve for me with this project especially with track and rolling stock construction but the challenge is all part of the fun.

 

I will post over the next few weeks some of the progress over the last year

 

 

196FA980-C45C-4F2A-B3B1-537113094570.jpeg

  • Like 5
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The aim will be to model the pre grouping era 1910-1920.

However apart from some minor track alignment alterations little changed over the next 50 years so it will probably possible to model a later era simply with stock change.

 

The gas complex had its own standard gauge railway and a narrow gauge one.

The majority of the companies locos were bought directly from Barclay and make great modelling projects in themselves

64B06904-3847-4B24-9515-610B85AE7A05.jpeg

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Narrow gauge Barclay

 

Not quite the first part of the project attempted but always going to be a challenge was some form of reproduction of the narrow gauge system.

 

The locos were low height on 2ft gauge.

Luckily a plan of a very similar Barclay engine  was available online. This saved a near impossible trip to Glasgow to browse over Barclay archives (I say luckily because this would be a challenge in lockdown period).

This plan and photos were used to make 3D plan of the loco using a simple free program called Tinkercad. I have no design experience but actually quite enjoyed playing around with this programme (maybe start with something simpler than an engine). My kids tell me the programme is for kids so it cant be that hard, so I would encourage others to give it a go. I have an anycubic printer which was used for tests but because this was to be a small detailed model the final versions were printed off by Shapeways.

 

Two of these locos survive for real in preservation.

No 5 Esme, pictured is one of the originals

 

Note the not quite prototypical gentleman driver!

 

At present locos are wheel-less and static. The plan will be to try and motorise probably using T gauge mechanisms?

489585DF-A598-4257-85CC-15FA22325BBD.jpeg

A49381BE-F962-470C-B12E-92B692FB7491.jpeg

538CD0D0-38F5-446A-A1DA-1B4831A25D44.jpeg

30EE2840-D3A7-4210-87BD-DFCFC8A6B400.jpeg

  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

THE STATION

 

The station had no direct road access and was designed purely for workers trains.

 

The building is listed and still stands along with the original gas holder. All other buildings have been demolished.

 

I was lucky enough for Scottish gas to allow me a site visit a few years ago so I have a good selection of photos.

There has however been some modification over the years.

 

Using the photos for measurement I managed to make some basic scale plans and subsequently replicated on Tinkercad , 3D CAD.

29FCC706-34AE-4496-B512-4BA59BBE6CC5.jpeg

5F3253B9-6962-471D-840C-23A8EA94A0F8.jpeg

11983231_7bd7e99e17_b.jpg

15874607002_c3b5e3315c_o.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

STATION Cont

 

Station building is still work in progress

3D printed in parts on my anycubic.

Used a textured brick paper by redutex which I further painted/detailed

 

 

B37F6CF0-B272-4BC5-9251-EAA3DE554742.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, kingrail said:

Only problem now is how to do the windows....

You could draw them on paper, place the glazing material over the drawing, scribe the glazing bars onto it and then fill the scribed lines with paint.  A less laborious method would be to draw up an etch for them.  The windows on my buildings for Kirkallanmuir are mostly etched.

 

Jim

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Jim

I actually have to confess that  I have moved  from this stage.

 

Although no previous design experience I had a shot at CAD and went for a photo etch.

A bit of a learning curve as some frames I made a little too delicate which made them near impossible to file down to size without distorting. 
The larger windows pictured worked better.
So a few frames are a little distorted but I am generally happy with the results.

 

D6B9FC4B-13CF-4730-8FDC-0C542B5D8A74.jpeg

71A8A36A-8331-4D6A-9EA0-FB9DB547DA2F.jpeg

92A9097A-6BBE-4DBE-94EF-5132AE8491D8.jpeg

  • Like 8
  • Craftsmanship/clever 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 04/04/2021 at 08:50, kingrail said:

Thanks Jim

I actually have to confess that  I have moved  from this stage.

 

Although no previous design experience I had a shot at CAD and went for a photo etch.

A bit of a learning curve as some frames I made a little too delicate which made them near impossible to file down to size without distorting. 
The larger windows pictured worked better.
So a few frames are a little distorted but I am generally happy with the results.

 

D6B9FC4B-13CF-4730-8FDC-0C542B5D8A74.jpeg

71A8A36A-8331-4D6A-9EA0-FB9DB547DA2F.jpeg

92A9097A-6BBE-4DBE-94EF-5132AE8491D8.jpeg


Tamiya do some photo-etch scissors which make cutting delicate items off the fret an absolute doddle.  As do Xuron.

What they both fail to offer is a tool to find them in the carpet afterwards.

Mark

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2
  • Funny 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Mark

 

Bought  a pair of those a while back. Cant recall if they were for metal etches or plastic sprues. In any case I was’t impressed and they now linger somewhere in the depths of the toolbox.

 

I don’t  have a carpet yet still manage to loose the bits!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the inside station portion of the platform.

Some pics from previous site visit.

 

Again 3D printed base with etched windows.

Window frames need a bit of a tidy and the walls will have tiles added.

 

The curved roof is an unusual feature. I think this shows the benefits of 3D printing.

 

Shame is that when constructed most of this will not be easy to see!

6B49B967-2654-443C-9A5C-90CE190B6F9F.jpeg

22BE0A5C-9F56-4A78-9CC9-7C1967D8D159.jpeg

715784E5-D918-47C0-9943-2FDEEB18C802.jpeg

7B607E88-2642-40FE-99AF-F19159ADC130.jpeg

ECEB6491-C7FC-4FBF-99DE-C0816C54CD80.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Presumably the curved roof is a form of fireproof construction? I have seen similar in textile mill buildings, usually with brick arches spanning between iron beams.

 

Andy

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

At the other end of the country there are similar brick arches in the former East London Line station at Surrey Quays in south-east London, now part of the London Overground system.

LO 378 154 Surrey Quays station roof structure   17 1 2018.jpg

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

 

Updated pics of internal platform wall

 

Just completed the internal wall tonight.

The tiling is actually redulux 3D brick paper painted over.

 

Again shame this wont be seen. Maybe have to have to install a platform cam :)

827311BC-5870-427E-A5E4-4D6F86207004.jpeg

8F85F05A-DB12-4AC3-8103-3D9CEBFFDF7B.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 05/04/2021 at 17:41, 2mmMark said:


Tamiya do some photo-etch scissors which make cutting delicate items off the fret an absolute doddle.  As do Xuron.

What they both fail to offer is a tool to find them in the carpet afterwards.

Mark

To the inventing shed, I've found a market, now I just need to work out how to make a palm-sized metal detector...!

 

I never fail to be impressed by those who design their own etches for things as tiny and delicate as can be used in 2mm. Looks a great project, looking forward to following.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

According to an article by Kenneth Williamson in a recent issue of the CR Assoc. Journal (The True Line, or TTL as it's referred to), the original is still in working order.  There are photo's  of the station and the gas works locos near the foot of this page .

 

Jim

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim assuming you might be referring to the clock on the station building?

Not been past in recently to confirm if the clock still reads correct time or not.

 

There have been intermittent plans to reuse the station building (and the gas holder) that are both listed.

The most recent involves it being a social square centre piece near tram station, so hopefully a useful future for it.

A4B7F83B-04AD-466D-9656-CBC5FC0A301F.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

FUNCTIONAL CLOCK-FACE

 

The previous watch picture is what is called a ring watch.

Its face is the right size for a 2mm scale clock tower.

 

Glass removed.

Edges filled down 

Existing face scratched off as of too modern design.

 

However clock face transfers ‘without hands’ are hard to find.

I eventually found this nail art set bought from Australia!

 

News transfer added and a coat of varnish

 

Stuck to the back of the 3D printed clock tower with tacky wax at present which actually holds quite well.A92B1B0F-D545-4F81-8B3C-EB458D6D3A62.jpeg.e5a59aea53f0cc6cba63f1681b3ae92b.jpegD8595695-E19E-42CF-A936-1BC57592D8B4.jpeg.dfaee3dddb6c08bc86a60c890eb8214e.jpeg

 

 

84420209-6888-46F7-B15B-772EA5259AF2.jpeg

92882D38-4795-4710-88F2-2DC706A1CA0F.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just before someone points this out, the clockface surround is different from the present day real one.

I have yet to find a picture of the clock from the last century (it would have to have been taken from the works itself). 
However pictures from 20 yrs ago show my design. (Actually 2005 ) , although I don't know for sure this is the original.

There was subsequently storm damage to the real thing  leading to the present day white surround.

11983231_7bd7e99e17_b.jpg

E994FA68-460D-4A3F-BEF8-FA0982C33175.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.