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Shawplan Extreme Etch Class 37/40 windscreen advice


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Hi All,

 

I have some Shawplan Extreme Etchings windscreens which I'd like to fit to a Bachmann Class 40 (current version). The etches include separate parts for both the windscreens themselves and a backing plate into which they fit.

 

I was wondering whether anyone can advise the best method of fitting the backing plate to the loco? I seem to remember reading that you're supposed to slit the bonnet top across the base of the windows (with a razor saw or similar), to give the backing plate a groove to bed into. However, in this case the backing plate would sit over the old plastic windows, which would add 0.5mm or so to their prominence due to the thickness of the etch. To my eyes, looking at drawings of the Class 40, this would push the window too close to the nose top hatchways.

 

Is the accepted method of fitting these etches more complex than I'm imagining (e.g. drastically cutting back into the old windows to offset the added thickness of the new etch)? I've seen a lot of excellent models done using these etches, so it must be possible, but this seems like a riskier bit of surgery than I was expecting! The only major cuts I was expecting to be needed were the slit across the bonnet top and removal of the old plastic window struts/widening of the aperture.

 

Any advice on this would be much appreciated.

 

Cheers,

 

Liam

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  • Pillar changed the title to Shawplan Extreme Etch Class 37/40 windscreen advice

The Shawplan etches are designed in the expectation that you cut away the existing plastic window pillars in the loco body completely. It's not so risky doing this cutting as you are removing material completely from under the area where the replacement etch will go!

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On 15/04/2021 at 21:32, Pillar said:

However, in this case the backing plate would sit over the old plastic windows, which would add 0.5mm or so to their prominence due to the thickness of the etch.

 

Unless I've misinterpreted your exact wording, but to clarify, you will be removing the old plastic windows anyway and replacing with the separate Shawplan flush-glazing... I'm assuming that you are aware of this? 

 

Best

Al

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I fitted 3 sets of these and didn't use the backing plate as I didn't see the need.  I simply removed the window pillars and carefully enlarged the opening to ensure the plastic surround is not visible through the glazing.

 

As another tip, I found it easier to paint the etch and install laserglaze before fitting it to the loco as it makes it so much easier to get the glazing in.

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I’ve not used the backing plate, instead I’ve filed the windows out using the etch as a template until there is a little lip for the glazing to sit in. I kept the 2 middle bars as they help centre the etch and they are an extra surface to glue the etch to, but what remains is very thin.

 

I then attached the etch to the 2 centre pillars with superglue, let it set, then attached the sides by using a thin card to spread the superglue underneath the etch.

 

Finally, I used the superglue and activator method to fill in all around the tops of the windscreen a la Barrowmore’s class 40s. See link. http://www.barrowmoremrg.co.uk/Journal/BMRJ_Issue_40_pub.pdf

 

The next one I do will have the backing plate as it gives a representation of the welded seam around the windscreens, but it is a minute detail at that scale, for the rivet counters (or weld spotters) out there.

 

The latest Bachmann class 40's windows match the etch quite closely, and the recent 37s look close too, so I'm still umming and aahing whether to do them. An etch for just the raised grommets would be ideal, as it's too subtle on the Bachman screens. Think there's a thread on here where someone painstakingly cut them out from the Shawplan etch and stuck them on and the result looked superb.

 

A Vitrains 37 and Early Bachmann/Lima Hybrid 40 (awaiting horn grilles) below.

 

Shawplan Screens.jpg

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8 minutes ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

There's a reason for that!

 

Mike.

It’s taken years for the manufacturers to get there though. The Triang 37 was the worst of the lot, but Lima and Vitrains were bad. The original Bachy ones were closer but no cigar. Now all I need is the grommets!

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On 15/04/2021 at 21:32, Pillar said:

Hi All,

 

I have some Shawplan Extreme Etchings windscreens which I'd like to fit to a Bachmann Class 40 (current version). The etches include separate parts for both the windscreens themselves and a backing plate into which they fit.

 

I was wondering whether anyone can advise the best method of fitting the backing plate to the loco? I seem to remember reading that you're supposed to slit the bonnet top across the base of the windows (with a razor saw or similar), to give the backing plate a groove to bed into. However, in this case the backing plate would sit over the old plastic windows, which would add 0.5mm or so to their prominence due to the thickness of the etch. To my eyes, looking at drawings of the Class 40, this would push the window too close to the nose top hatchways.

 

Is the accepted method of fitting these etches more complex than I'm imagining (e.g. drastically cutting back into the old windows to offset the added thickness of the new etch)? I've seen a lot of excellent models done using these etches, so it must be possible, but this seems like a riskier bit of surgery than I was expecting! The only major cuts I was expecting to be needed were the slit across the bonnet top and removal of the old plastic window struts/widening of the aperture.

 

Any advice on this would be much appreciated.

 

Cheers,

 

Liam


Hi Liam,

 

I’ve ended up doing quite a few 37s with these (just finished fitting my 5th set). I’ve posted photos of all of the tractors here:

 

I think it’s well worth doing and lifts the face of the model to actually look like a 37. Here’s my attempt at 37516 just after a coat of black primer which is the best result I’ve had so far:14C5223E-3543-499D-AF69-42A0DCA19B2C.jpeg.4ddefffaf7d76e3d9280f4ec292b964d.jpeg

 

I’ve followed Phil Eames’ excellent DEMU update article (not sure if you’re a member) which in short involves filing back the moulded windscreens the width of the etch, then using a razor saw to allow the backing plate to drop into the correct height. You then glue in the etch and fill the gaps around the etch. The step by step guide is very helpful.

 

I don’t like the method of sticking the windscreen part straight over the existing windscreen as I don’t think it looks quite right with the step. The only other alternative I’ve found is on the thread below - which looks great but I couldn’t cut off the rubbers nearly as well as @Daddyman did on his 37s:

 

 

 

I’ve learnt the following lessons doing mine:

- Use Swann Morton blades to take as much material out of the inside of the cab roof as possible. Otherwise the glazing won’t fit.

- Try and fit the glazing before gluing in the etch. This is pretty essential and something I’ve messed up meaning I need to restart one of my locos - not ideal! 
- Use a needle file to file the edge of the etch to bed it in with the roof. I’ve only just tried it and it’s made the world of difference to the appearance of the model to achieve the curved appearance of the cab roof around the windscreens.


I wish I’d have tried giving it a go on a scrap body shell beforehand but you live and learn!

 

Hopefully the above is helpful - if you have any more questions please drop me a PM I’d be happy to help!

 

Kind regards,

 

Will

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4 hours ago, Southwich said:

 

 

Yes, that’s the one. I have a number of bits on order from Brian at Shawplan. I wonder if he may be up for doing some grommets. Or maybe look to get some made up myself.

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2 hours ago, 97406 said:

Yes, that’s the one. I have a number of bits on order from Brian at Shawplan. I wonder if he may be up for doing some grommets. Or maybe look to get some made up myself.


As far as I’m aware he said he wasn’t going to do the rubbers. For the more modern ones the reinforced grommets are separate so you can easily do what @Daddyman did. I think using Brian’s etches are definitely worth it but if there was an alternative that didn’t involve cutting up the entire windscreen that would be great

 

Kind regards,

 

Will

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13 hours ago, Southwich said:


As far as I’m aware he said he wasn’t going to do the rubbers. For the more modern ones the reinforced grommets are separate so you can easily do what @Daddyman did. I think using Brian’s etches are definitely worth it but if there was an alternative that didn’t involve cutting up the entire windscreen that would be great

 

Kind regards,

 

Will

I asked him to do rubbers, only, yes, but he refused as then they wouldn't fit the Vitrains model!  

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  • 4 weeks later...

A belated thank you to everyone for all the advice, and to Will for pointing out the very useful DEMU Update article.

 

After considering the options for a while, I chickened out of cutting away the entire windscreen and have gone for a variation of Daddyman's method: cutting the grommets off the etch and glueing them on individually. Before butchering the etches I temporarilly glued them over the Bachy windows as a template to trace out the weld line with a scriber. Hoepfully this will give the best of both worlds, but time will tell.

 

I'll post some pictures soon.

 

Cheers,

 

Liam

 

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  • 3 months later...

DSCF0232.jpg.2451722ee5325ce55bf589fc4b34fa6a.jpg

 

I've finally managed to get the backplate and screens installed satisfactorily on a loco.

 

In a nutshell:

  • The Bachmann moulded glazing bars were removed and I filed out the aperture in readiness for the etch to be overlaid. It is important to leave a small lip on the top of the bonnet.
  • I cut the bottom part of the backplate off and the 2 thin glazing bar backings to create an inverted ‘U’ shape.
  • I assembled the screen and backplate flat and soldered around the sides and the top (this is easier done from the front using a flux first, and letting the solder get drawn in by capilliary action). Don’t worry about getting solder all over it as the next step remedies this.. 
  • I removed excess solder with some desoldering braid, then sanded with 600 and 1000 grit wet and dry and primed the assembly to identify and remove any imperfections. It took a few goes (and the odd bit of filler on some) to get it right.
  • I then inverted the screens on a flat surface and folded them using downward pressure with a craft knife blade using the etched guide in the backplate and the windscreen dividing bars as a guide.
  • The screens can now be overlaid over the cab front and the aperture in the cab front filed out so there is room for the glazing to be fitted from behind at the end of the process
  • I glued the assembly over the front of the cab
  • I then used superglue and activator all around the screens applied with a thin wire. This makes the superglue act as a filler and the method is very precise with a little practice. It took 2 applications.
  • I rubbed down the superglue fillets and painted
  • Finally the wipers were refitted and the Laserglaze sanded and filed until the windows fitted as flushly as possible. They were stuck in using gloss acrylic varnish.

 

Edited by 97406
Improvements to the process. More may follow.
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6 hours ago, 97406 said:

DSCF0232.jpg.2451722ee5325ce55bf589fc4b34fa6a.jpg

 

I've finally managed to get the backplate and screens installed satisfactorily on a loco.

 

In a nutshell:

  • The Bachmann moulded glazing bars were removed and I filed out the aperture in readiness for the etch to be overlaid. It is important to leave a small lip on the top of the bonnet.
  • I assembled the screen and backplate flat and soldered around the sides and the top (from behind). I left the bottom part unsoldered.
  • I removed the bottom part of the backplate with snips so the screens just sit on the bonnet.
  • I removed excess solder with some desoldering braid, then primed the assembly to identify and remove any imperfections.
  • I then inverted the screens on a flat surface and folded them using downward pressure with a craft knife blade using the etched guide in the backplate and the windscreen dividing bars as a guide.
  • The screens can now be overlaid over the cab front and the aperture in the cab front filed out so there is room for the glazing to be fitted from behind at the end of the process
  • I glued the assembly over the front of the cab
  • I then used superglue and activator all around the screens applied with a thin wire. This makes the superglue act as a filler and the method is very precise with a little practice. It took 2 applications.
  • I rubbed down the superglue fillets and painted
  • Finally the wipers were refitted and the Laserglaze sanded and filed until the windows fitted as flushly as possible. They were stuck in using gloss acrylic varnish.

 


The 40 looks very nice indeed!
 

Interesting to see how others tackle fitting the screens. Have you filed back the front of the plastic windscreen so then the etch fits in correctly? Also interested to see you didn’t take a razor saw to the body as I found my windows sat far too high unless I used the saw to get the windows to sit low into the bonnet. 
 

the mention of cutting the corners off of the etches is one I’d echo, makes things much easier! 
 

Here are my two tractors 516/517 currently having the chassis sorted out

 

3392A8A2-6406-433F-B2D9-9430AAE5B085.jpeg.fbbd9dca41dc060d7f980b07dda801b3.jpeg
 

I found it a right pain to get the etches to sit at the correct height, but once in it makes such a difference to the look of the loco!

 

Kind regards,

 

Will

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22 minutes ago, Southwich said:

The 40 looks very nice indeed!

 

Interesting to see how others tackle fitting the screens. Have you filed back the front of the plastic windscreen so then the etch fits in correctly? Also interested to see you didn’t take a razor saw to the body as I found my windows sat far too high unless I used the saw to get the windows to sit low into the bonnet. 

 

 

Thanks, it turned out well. No, I didn't file the windscreen surrounds, just sanded it back to the plastic and sat the assembled screen and backplate on the front. The radius of the back plate is a touch smaller than the roof, and the superglue just flowed into the gap, and it goes off almost straight away due to the activator. It only needed a light sanding to get the rounded corner right. The other end also has the backplate fitted, but I was a little generous with the solder and the representation of the weld seam got lost. It is still an improvement on the Bachmann screens, even on the retooled version, and the change will be rolled out to my 2 retooled 40s and 3 Bachmann 37s.

 

Look forward to seeing your 37s completed.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I’ve started to do the rest of my 37s and 40s, and I’m working on a full set of pictures to post on here, but this just about sums up my simplified approach, with one set of windscreens just sat on a Bachmann retooled 40. The existing screens will be removed and filed out before I stick the Shawplan bits on and fill with superglue, which is the next step.

DSCF0251b.jpg.f74c6e363d638659341788c3b4ad0622.jpg

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6 hours ago, 97406 said:

Class 37 stylee. The challenge is to see if any of the orange stripe around the cabs makes it through! 

20210907_152542.jpg

 

Didnt on my one lol, I fitted the windscreen exactly how Shawplan intended and had to repaint the whole area and redo the orange stripe, worth it though as it looks much better now

 

NL

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10 hours ago, NickL2008 said:

 

Didnt on my one lol, I fitted the windscreen exactly how Shawplan intended and had to repaint the whole area and redo the orange stripe, worth it though as it looks much better now

 

NL

I think the need to fill the bottom sides will mean I need to redo the lower stripe. I’ll try and keep the side ones intact as safety striping is my nemesis! There is the fallback position of a banger blue respray, as I can never have too many blue locos for my main period, but I’ll try and keep the sector livery intact. Of course I can take more time cutting the backplate so it’s a snugger fit next time, and perhaps I’ll find closer fitting examples from the other five assemblies. The acrylic varnish used for glazing will also fix the lower edge of the windscreens to the top of the bonnet. It makes for a good adhesive.

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