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Ryde Pier Head must have been a sight to see on a busy summer Saturday, sadly like many others it's a shadow of its former self now.

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Actually going to go for a terminus that I was never inside - Glasgow Buchanan Street.   However having done a lot of research into the station and collected a lot of photographs and data I feel that I know it quite well.  Crying out to be modelled with its huge variety of possible locomotive visitors.

 

Jim

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Fairford - pretty, interesting traffic pattern and an interesting layout. It's just a pity that it is too long to model in a reasonable space.

 

Fraserburgh - 3 platforms, 2 branch lines and a large goods yard. I would love to model this one, and if exhibited, I would keep a bucket of rotting fish below the baseboard to complete the "atmosphere".

 

Laxfield on the Mid Suffolk - again interesting traffic pattern and quirky layout requiring 2 locomotives to be stabled there, despite minimal traffic. Add the extension over the crossing to Laxfield mill.

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Bucolic branchline termini seem close to Paradise, but they didn't often see many trains, in any era. As a teen trainspotter, that was not a plus. At the other end of the line, metropolitan (with a small m) London glittered with termini of infinite size and ceaseless arrivals and departures. Less than 20 years later I would occasionally be SM at one or two of them. 

 

Victoria, where I worked for a while in 1967/8, terminus of my beloved LB&SCR, but with added cachet from boat trains on the other side of the wall. And, 20 years later, about which I wrote Investment Submissions which changed the shape and feel of the place.

 

Charing Cross, compact and hard to operate - a train for Dartford in all 6 platforms was not a mark of success! - yet right in the heart of London. 

 

Euston, where I completed my career, albeit just in a portakabin on the roof, but from which trains to important cities left in some style. It was also the first London terminus with ticket gates, which was like pulling teeth at times with Railtrack, but I got there.

 

Paddington, where pre-Covid I would depart and arrive several times a year to/from Torbay. Again, some exotic destinations.

 

Marylebone, a cramped concourse suited a backwater, but which these days is a victim of earned success. Chiltern does rather well. 

 

KX, lovely steam when I first knew it, and scene of some important meetings in my final years, albeit I was negotiating for the lesser TOC. A cramped track layout compared to some. 

 

Liv St, initially with a blue 0-6-0 for station pilot, but where 30 years later colleagues had rebuilt the place, and I was a tenant for about a year in their offices at Old Broad St, before they summarily threw me out. Hmmm.

 

Fen St - compact and so busy in the peak, but quite tucked away. I turned up one Saturday for a LT&S Resignalling filming train, only to find it shuttered due to a bomb atrocity and had to get the tube to Barking.

 

Cannon and Holborn V - blew hot and cold every weekday, the latter succumbing to Thameslink, in the course of which I was part of a property developers' presentation to the City Fathers.

 

London Bridge, where in in the mid-70s I spent a few months as Traffic Regulator in the new box. The Central side had been 'my' terminus in my Croydon Control Area 4 days, 50 years ago, too. 

 

And that leaves Waterloo, probably my favourite. As a teen, in school holidays, one arrived from Dorking North to the sound of military music, getting us all marching off the platforms. In the evening it was gentle Ronnie Aldrich soothing us as we went home for tea. Abba's Eurovision winner was a bit of an intrusion. Five years working in the offices, but never on the station as such. But the LSWR West of England line starts there, and that still holds the same cachet as it did when we caught the Atlantic Coast Express to Port Isaac Road.  

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For architectural impact I don’t think you can beat St. Pancras International. For location it has to be Kyle of Lochalsh; fresh sea air and mountains (even better with the sound of a 26 or 37 too).

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6 hours ago, luckymucklebackit said:

Actually going to go for a terminus that I was never inside - Glasgow Buchanan Street.   However having done a lot of research into the station and collected a lot of photographs and data I feel that I know it quite well.  Crying out to be modelled with its huge variety of possible locomotive visitors.

 

Jim


I would certainly agree with the variety of engines - at times it was hard to remember it had been a Caley/LMS station. On my first visit, I saw 60096 and 60529; 6 out of the first 7 V2s I saw were at Buchanan Street (the seventh was at St. Rollox shed). And there were echoes of its early history as a station for trains to and from the south - again on that first visit, I saw 77005 on a local to its home town of Hamilton.

 

But as an actual station? - it was a dump! (Other opinions are available, but unlikely.)

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Coming from Nottingham I didn't see many termini when I was young!

 

Later though I always enjoyed visits to Manchester Piccadilly, when I first lived in the city there was a mix of 25kVAC, 1500VDC and diesel traction.

 

Of course, the station also has through platforms on the route to Oxford Road and beyond, so it ofers the best of both worlds.

 

As for branch line termini it will be a four way tie between Tetbury, Grassington, Oxenhope (as it was in the very early preservation days) and Barton on Humber (before rationalisation).

 

For oddities - New Holland Pier with the Humber ferries and trains.

 

For seaside termini - Skegness - coming from Nottingham it was a sttaion I travelled to from time to time as a child on day trips to the sea before Mum and Dad bought a car.

 

David

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London Euston. I remember seeing it as a child when it was nearly new, and what a bright, clean open space the concourse seemed to be considering it was the mid to late sixties, and a lot of the railways where I was brought up were filthy and run down.

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9 hours ago, Nick C said:

Ryde Pier Head must have been a sight to see on a busy summer Saturday, sadly like many others it's a shadow of its former self now.

Arrrived there one summer saturday in fifties boy what a crush coming back we were waiting for the ferry and we had been a couple of hours.Alocal fisherman offered twenty of us a trip to Pompy for a couple of quid per person.My dad paid up and we a wild crossing but eventualy got back to London.

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Wales- Pwllheli.  I quite like it even these days, with a bit of the old station building still there, and for a modern terminus it surprisingly still has a stabling siding, train-servicing facilities, a run-round loop and signal box.  Plus it's at the seaside!  Porthmadog Harbour for a preserved one in the same area, really great station building and there always seems to be something going on with one of the many sidings, and two lines starting there.  Probably as close to a narrow gauge main line station as you can get in the UK

 

Scotland- Loch Tay, especially towards the end of the life of the Killin branch.  Station closed but in private hands, and kept in good nick.  Engine shed at the headshunt, little bridge over a stream, almost engulfed by woodland... always looks very pretty in photographs.

 

England, modern image- Stourbridge Town.  A lovely, ridiculously compact station, but still has a manned building, and eccentric motive power in the Parry railcars.

 

England, preserved- Oxenhope, in the present day.  Carriage sidings, museum shed, compact terminus and a nice little cafe too.

 

Overseas- Bohme, Saxony.  A truncated railway where the resulting terminus served the edge of a village of about 20 houses.  There was a goods loop, a corrugated metal barn-like station building on a low platform, and a service with a railbus trundling back and forth.  I've loved it ever since I first read about it as a child.

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12 hours ago, Caley739 said:

Glasgow Central, probably the best looking large terminus in the country.

 

Absolutely this. It's everything that a big city station should be.

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Liverpool Lime Street is the answer. Both real and model.

 

Everything from the early railways to the LNWR, LMS through to BR and onwards including electrics and even Deltics on Trans Pennine trains.

 

It even had this on a plinth.

 

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Jason

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Kings Cross was my favourite. I could stand at the platform end all day watching the movements on and off the refuelling point; and often did. There was always something moving. 

 

Only when the HSTs arrived, did the fun gradually peter out; although the rot set in when the outer suburban services went over to electric units. 

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3 hours ago, DaveF said:

Coming from Nottingham I didn't see many termini when I was young!


London Road Low Level? :)

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15 hours ago, pH said:

But as an actual station? - it was a dump! (Other opinions are available, but unlikely.)

Yes. Buchanan Street was a hovel when compared to Central or St Enoch which were both among the best.

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Of the large ones, another vote for Waterloo from me. As a small boy from a small quiet country town it totally "wowed" me, and fortunately the film "Terminus" captures it at almost precisely the right date, so I can sort-of time-travel when I fancy. Later, I came to know it in fair detail, both the "BR" and "Underground" parts, through my work, and even now, in semi-retirement I still occasionally have business there - bit weird that what was the board room is now reception!

 

And, at the opposite end of the ACE, one that I never saw in service, but which still manages to feel like the romantic railway destination that it once was: Padstow. The idea of arriving there in early evening in summer, in the same comfy Bulleid coach that you boarded at Waterloo in late-morning is very seductive.

 

An overlooked crop of interesting termini are the London suburban ones, some of which still manage to cling to a bit of the old atmosphere - Hammersmith (Met.) is worth a look if you've never been there, likewise Watford (Met.), and Richmond, and Ealing Broadway terminal sides. The not-TfL ones are also good, but never so well-maintained as TfL.

 

Then, a really odd foreign one: Plentzia, on Line 1 of Bilbao Metro. Imagine St Ives, Cornwall, but half an hour from Oxford Circus on the Central Line. Much of the route is what was a C19th steam railway, which winds through some very nice scenery to get there, and you step off the metro, through a 100+yo station, to walk over stylish footbridge into the town/village. 

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Another couple of foreign ones - Åtran in southern Sweden, which was the terminus of two lines, neither of which was that busy but together would make an interesting project

Also perhaps Älvdalen if only for the old name Elfdalian, its a bit long really but!

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