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This morning apparently the rail drop train derailed blocking everything at church fenton. After seeing pictures on Facebook it’s done a blinding job 

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Saw some pictures earlier,  looks like a right pain to rerail as a rail was part way down the chute 

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Not a good morning for the commuters trying to get to Leeds. There was also a crash on the A64 west bound between York and Tadcaster in the early hours that shut the road for several hours.

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1 hour ago, iands said:

Not a good morning for the commuters trying to get to Leeds. There was also a crash on the A64 west bound between York and Tadcaster in the early hours that shut the road for several hours.

 

I wa looking at train times earlier and ones that were going via Castleford were taking about 12 min more but line capacity couldn't take all trains 

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17 hours ago, russ p said:

Saw some pictures earlier,  looks like a right pain to rerail as a rail was part way down the chute 

 

Might that have been a factor in the derailment?

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21 hours ago, ejstubbs said:

 

Might that have been a factor in the derailment?

 

Nope!

 

Human error inside the possession is what I'm hearing.

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58 minutes ago, billbedford said:

So why is that bloke walking in front of the loco is the second half of the clip?

Is he perhaps going to remove either the 'STOP' boards and/or detenators protecting the incident site, allowing the locomotive to leave the site?

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1 minute ago, Fat Controller said:

Is he perhaps going to remove either the 'STOP' boards and/or detenators protecting the incident site, allowing the locomotive to leave the site?

 

Guiding the loco in and stopping it as required is my take.

 

In possessions, machinery requires a person to act as a designated 'machine controller' to co-ordinate movements, hopefully preventing it hitting someone or something.

 

Although locos are not usually though of 'machines' as such, given the situation where plans are being made up on the hoof so to speak, its probably a wise move.

 

In the event I understand the Freightliner loco wasn't needed - all wagons were re-railed with no damage so they got hauled out by the original loco.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The loco is moving towards the site, with the man walking in front of it. It looks like the loco is there to recover the un-derailed wagons from the rear of the train. 

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28 minutes ago, billbedford said:

The loco is moving towards the site, with the man walking in front of it. It looks like the loco is there to recover the un-derailed wagons from the rear of the train. 

 

You'd do well to split that rake of wagons without unloading it first! ;)

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2 hours ago, billbedford said:

So why is that bloke walking in front of the loco is the second half of the clip?

 

Whatever the reason, I wouldn't have thought walking in the 4ft was the sensible thing to do, the 6ft or the cess would be more appropriate to my mind.

 

 

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1 hour ago, billbedford said:

The loco is moving towards the site, with the man walking in front of it. It looks like the loco is there to recover the un-derailed wagons from the rear of the train. 

 

That was probably the plan - and had the wagons been seriously damaged then it may have been an option once the rails they were carrying had been cut.

 

However as it turned out there was minimal damage to the waggons and their load so once they were back on the track it was merely a case of finish dropping the rail and then depart. Fixing the damaged infrastructure on the other hand....

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1 hour ago, Siberian Snooper said:

 

Whatever the reason, I wouldn't have thought walking in the 4ft was the sensible thing to do, the 6ft or the cess would be more appropriate to my mind.

 

 

 

Walking in the 4ft ensures the driver has a good view of the individual - consider how much easier it is to see something out of your windscreen than it being half obscured by the car bodywork

 

Also please note that in such sites any movements MUST be made at WALKING PACE and all drivers will know that and ensure their speed is controlled such that they can easily stop should the person stop walking or fall over etc.

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18 minutes ago, phil-b259 said:

 

Walking in the 4ft ensures the driver has a good view of the individual - consider how much easier it is to see something out of your windscreen than it being half obscured by the car bodywork

 

Also please note that in such sites any movements MUST be made at WALKING PACE and all drivers will know that and ensure their speed is controlled such that they can easily stop should the person stop walking or fall over etc.


Totally. This isn’t the operational railway, it has become a worksite. Possession rules.

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safest way is for him to be in the cab surely, thats what id be doing if it was me on the loco, as phil says locos arent classed as machines so dont need a banksman (for want of a better word) so no need for someone to walk in fornt but in this covid age maybe the driver or ES didnt want TO have 2 in the cab?

 

looking at his armband i think its the ES (Engineering supervisor) so he will have most likey been to lift the worksite marker boards to let the loco in from ‘picop land’ 

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, admiles said:

 

You'd do well to split that rake of wagons without unloading it first! ;)

 

One of many mickey-takes in Control occurred when a loaded long welded rail train developed a fault on a wagon mid-train. The section Controller was advised to tell the Traincrew to detach the wagon and continue forward. Fortunately he realised the absurdity before passing the message on..... 

 

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I would think that cutting those rails on the train would have been absolutely the last resort. Operators have to be near rails whilst cutting them, and those ends could go anywhere .

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Just now, 96701 said:

I would think that cutting those rails on the train would have been absolutely the last resort. Operators have to be near rails whilst cutting them, and those ends could go anywhere .

 

I agree* but if the wagons were so significantly damaged that they couldn't be re railed then what other choice would they have?

 

Fortunately it didn't come to that

 

* For those not in the industry do not underestimate the bendiness / springiness of unsecured rail! Although very flexible going round a curve like the one at Church Fenton still puts in a lot of tension which can cause significant harm if suddenly released.

 

 

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