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1 hour ago, montyburns56 said:

I have a vague memory of someone modelling one of these in an 80s issue Railway Modeller???

 

LMS 27496 Garston 1936 by John Law

 

mersey - lms 27496 garston liverpool 1936

 

Didn't the Leeds model company make a model of this, or at least a body shell, for clockwork and electric. 

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They made an/the 0-4-0ST. I haven’t got my LNWR spotters book to hand, but I have a feeling that there were no real 0-4-0ST of this kind, but that there were 0-4-2ST. 
 

The LMC model is quite easy to find, they sold a lot of them, many in sets with track and wagons.

 

The Japanese company Seki/Sakai made copies of the LMC model for the British market too.

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I've googled the LMC model and it does seem to be "inspired" by this loco....

 

lmc06.JPG

 

 

I think the RM article may have been a kit build or a scratch build, although it could have been another publication.  Anyway after googling it I've discovered that the real thing was a LNWR 1F 0-6-0 square saddle tank.

 

http://www.lnwrs.org.uk/GoodsClassLocos/goods_class_menu.php?display_class_details=hsqs

 

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Maude Leaving Bathgate

With an arrangement like this could the loco take the bypass and not travel over the weighbridge and the wagons follow on the parallel route? The side step implies the chairs are in overlapping positions and are mounted on their own timbers. The side step would be greater if the chairs were mounted on the same timber.

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6 minutes ago, LNERGE said:

With an arrangement like this could the loco take the bypass and not travel over the weighbridge and the wagons follow on the parallel route?


Yes, it tended to be used on ‘through running’ weighbridges, whereas many in small goods yards were on sidings, and locos had no need to traverse them, or they had big catches to hold the bridge against the weight of a loco.

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One of those rare inside-cylinder, inside valve gear 0-4-0Ts. Where did they put all the gubbins?

The firebox is set well back to give space for a crank axle and eccentrics, but even then there’s little space for the cylinders and slidebars to clear the leading axle. Unless it was a geared drive as used on some true cranes? 

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No, there's space there if you look for it. The cylinders would be below the smokebox with the slidebars extending back above the leading axle. I suspect they're large bore cylinders but with a short stroke, giving a few more inches for the connecting rods. The valve gear might be a bit of a squeeze depending on what sort it is.

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The astonishing thing about the NLR is that some of its trains looked pretty much exactly like that from about 1880 until 1940 (latterly with Jinties up-front). There can’t have been many railways outside The Isle of Man and the Volks Electric which got stuck in time warps for longer.

 

 

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