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15 hours ago, montyburns56 said:

I'm guessing that this a J54/55/56? I'm sure that there's a J and 5 in its name somewhere....

LNER Service Stock No. 3 Doncaster Works by John Law

 

syks - lner service stock no 3 doncaster works

 

Service Stock No. 3 was, according to the RCTS Green Book, classified as a J54/2 at grouping.  It was formerly No. 3920, built in 1891, and survived as No. 68319 to 1950.  It only carried the No. 3 from 12/1928 to 4/1930, and was rebuilt to Class J55 in September 1933.

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On 11/11/2021 at 19:44, montyburns56 said:

Knott End Junction 1967 by George Woods

 

70024-92101 Knott End Junc. 20.6.67

 

The 9F hauled train on the right *looks* like it is made up of electrification train vehicles. Possibly on their way to electrification train Valhalla?

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7 minutes ago, montyburns56 said:

I'm posting this because I don't think I've ever seen a picture of a DMU with a 4 character headcode before.

 

Barking 1964 by trainsandtravel

 

DMU at Barking

 

I'm sure the 107s also originally had a large headcode panel on the roof like that. 123s and 124s certainly also carried headcodes, but their indicator panels were below the cab windows not above.

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7 minutes ago, montyburns56 said:

I'm posting this because I don't think I've ever seen a picture of a DMU with a 4 character headcode before.

 

Barking 1964 by trainsandtravel

 

DMU at Barking

 

I'm sure the 107s also originally had a large headcode panel on the roof like that. 123s and 124s certainly also carried headcodes, but their indicator panels were below the cab windows not above.

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24 minutes ago, montyburns56 said:

I'm posting this because I don't think I've ever seen a picture of a DMU with a 4 character headcode before.

 

Barking 1964 by trainsandtravel

 

DMU at Barking

 

 

It's a class 113 hydraulic cravens unit

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3 hours ago, hexagon789 said:

I'm sure the 107s also originally had a large headcode panel on the roof like that. 123s and 124s certainly also carried headcodes, but their indicator panels were below the cab windows not above.

2nd build of the class 120 Cross Country units also had panels below cab windows.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/26005071101

Edited by Ramblin Rich
phat phingers
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14 hours ago, keefer said:

Plenty of DMUs had headcode boxes, just not ones as big as that (cl.112/113 Cravens only) as they usually didn't include a destination indicator. That usually was smaller and mounted in the central windscreen.

 

 

I know that lots of them had them, I just haven't seen that many pictures of them in use. I guess that's partly because not many people were photographing DMUs in the 60s.

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2 minutes ago, montyburns56 said:

Mode Wheel Locks Shed 1981 by Murray Liston

I really must get on with my models of some of those! Life has been too busy recently, the Hudswell hasn’t made progress in months, the Sentinel kit remains unstarted. Though I have just started an MSC container flat (ex LMS D1674 bolster) as seen on the right hand side of the second image. 

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3 hours ago, Mol_PMB said:

What a lovely steeplecab! A bit bigger than many. I guess the power station had closed by this time.


3 of these are preserved, two I think in BE form, having been converted to that to work at Heysham power station, the other in the form shown in the photo. What I don’t know is where they are now.

 

They were built by HL/RSH, but had BTH electrical kit, and I suspect that the whole design might owe a lot to GE/BTH, so relating them closely to the NER, French, and Italian ones, and their antecedents in the US.

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