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Do youtubers contribute positively to railway modelling?


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I do like watching Japanese model making videos on Youtube as (a) the level of skill is amazing and (b) I have absolutely no idea what they are talking about.

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Posted (edited)

YouTube railway modelling channels have their' "pros and cons" in the same way as magazines; .....their content, quality and presentation vary.

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e.g.

Being both 'old' (65)  and British, I find the approach of 'some' presenters / influencers a tad 'puerile' - especially amongst some of our US cousins.

(The same way I cannot see the attraction of US 'sitcoms' such as 'Friends')

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To this end, I switch off or move on, when some sickly sweet, 'influencer' starts speaking; and admit I may be missing some helpful modelling advice....but, I'll live.

( However,  I remain glued to such delights as 'Hornsey Broadway' or 'Canada Street' and Mr Klimoski )

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We could move on to other 'social meeja' type platforms, such as 'Facebook' (cringe).

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This is where I find most amusement / boredom / annoyance ( in equal measures ), in posts and threads, such as

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"Look what postie brought me....." and we are presented with a photo of a  Heljan / Bachmann / Hornby model, still in its' box

or

"Here's my latest" - and we are gifted a poor quality photo of a bog standard Heljan / Bachmann / Hornby perched atop the  kitchen unit, with a dirty mug, microwave and a kettle as a backdrop

or

"Take a look at my HST collection" - and we are presented with a myriad of 4mm scale HST power cars, in every conceivable livery, laid out on the 'presenters' bed, contrasting with his duvet cover.

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Is it me, but has personal research disappeared ? - as I gain the impression now that many fellow 'modellers' (term used loosely) are either unable or unwilling to conduct their own research, finding it easier, and more convenient, to post a simple (in more ways than one ) question on a social media platform.

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How many times will I see a question such as

"Did a Brighton terrier last long enough to carry red stripe Railfreight livery ?"

Making one (well me at least) suspect that  "here's a modeller who has bought a model, totally alien to his/her/their modelling era, and is now looking to justify running it with all his/her/their other stock.

 

Am I too  old, and too far gone to change ?....................."asking for a friend" ?

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Off to take a tablet now, then sit in a darkened room until 'Pop Master'

 

Edited by br2975
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10 hours ago, D-A-T said:

Apologies in advance if I’m repeating a previous entry having not had the chance to read all the entries.

 

But YouTube only needs one video to be priceless. In my case it has just been released as part of a Society Virtual Show. The video? Templot for the Totally Confused. It’s not perfect but it just made everything click and now I’m away! I can use it. I would have paid good money for the video and that’s a Yorkshireman saying that! And if a proportion of my EMGS subscription paid for any part of it then bravo. 

 

I had intended to sit with demonstrator at either the EM or S4 show last year to get to grips with it but they were obviously cancelled. 

Funnily enough I was also thinking of mentioning this video. I have had a go at Templot several times in the past and got nowhere, but after watching this on the society show the mist finally started to clear. Throughly recommended, and that’s high praise indeed coming from me. 

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Okay, a confession. I subscribe to YouTube Premium because I can call up almost limitless videos of topics I actually want to watch, to the extent that I very rarely watch terrestrial TV these days. Additionally, YouTube responds to my searches by offering more appropriate recommendations. I've been offered some superb material that I wouldn't otherwise have discovered, hence a big thumbs-up from me.

 

As for the model railway content, I agree with many of the comments posted in this thread. There's some really good content if you know where to look. Even in my dotage I am still keen to learn new techniques and find the likes of Everard Junction a boon in that regard. Of others mentioned frequently, I dip into Chadwick Model Railway regularly, although I confess to never lasting for a whole video. I can't get into Jenny Kirk's Monday Club, but I did enjoy the 009 layout build. Other content I simply dip into and leave if it doesn't appeal to me, Sam's Trains included.

 

On balance I think YouTube is a real benefit. I have watched numerous tutorial videos, from learning and comparing different software products to cookery techniques and repairing a particular PC. And all on demand. What's not to like?

 

 

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, westernviscount said:

Does anyone here or anyone know of anyone else who makes money from youtube? 

 

I do, but I don't know if you'd count me as a railway modelling YouTuber. I used to put modelling videos out very regularly, and I still do over on my Patreon page, but for various reasons they're no longer a regular thing on the main channel (that's a whole rant that I won't get into right now). I am, however, best known as a railway YouTuber. I'm not going to go into the exact amount I make, partly because it's crass and partly because it varies from month to month. I am at a point where I could theoretically quit the day job, but the income is very varied and I live in constant fear that I might get a couple of bad months. Plus YouTube has this fun habit of suddenly changing the way it does things, which can wipe years-old channels out in an instant.

 

There are quite a few hobbyists who do make their living off their channels, but most of them either have very low overheads or are in far bigger hobbies than ours. I know Sam's Trains makes a living off it, there may be others. But the impression I get is that for most modellers, it's a sideline at best.

 

There's something of a balancing act with YouTube. What the platform likes is creators who produce long-form content frequently. It's very hard to produce long-form content several times a week that people will actually watch. This is why so many of the most successful YouTubers are people who stream games - actual quality content that's worth watching takes time. This is also why so many videos feel padded - YouTube encourages longer videos by allowing more advertising and therefore a higher income. I know there are those who complain about excessive advertising on YouTube, but it's very much a case of "don't hate the player, hate the game." Personally, I tend to put out short but numerous videos to make up the shortfall, but it takes up nearly all my free time.

 

 

Edited by HonestTom
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I started my YouTube channel to share my modelling journey, and both get feedback from others, and hopefully to inspire others, that anyone can do Railway Modelling, no matter the skill level. I'm always trying to get better.

 

Thankfully in just the last 6 months, I have attracted a lot of followers, and I hope I am providing them with value. 

 

I dont really follow the likes of Sams Trains - his style of modelling isnt for me. But my You Tube analytics data shows that many of those who view my channel, are subscribed to his - along with others that have been mentioned here such as @Jenny Emily, as well as including the likes of "Mouldy Raspberry" and @That Model Railway Guy - I guess it takes all sorts.

 

You Tube's "algorithm" is designed to recommend to the viewer content that will keep them watching. And its interesting to note that while I am subscribed to Sams Trains (and I watch the odd video by him), it doesnt recommend to me that I watch lots of his videos. Instead I get ones by Everard Junction, Chadwick Model Railway, Hornby Magazine  etc, which I of course, enjoy watching. 

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43 minutes ago, HonestTom said:

 

I do, but I don't know if you'd count me as a railway modelling YouTuber. I used to put modelling videos out very regularly, and I still do over on my Patreon page, but for various reasons they're no longer a regular thing on the main channel (that's a whole rant that I won't get into right now). I am, however, best known as a railway YouTuber.

 

 

I had wondered where they had gone! I do like your railway videos though, they're obviously very well researched and presented, and hence rightly well received. 

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, JohnR said:

 

I had wondered where they had gone! I do like your railway videos though, they're obviously very well researched and presented, and hence rightly well received. 

 

Thank you! I am currently considering a sort of half-and-half reimplementation (which the spellchecker informs me is not a word). Something like, here's a modelling project I've been working on, now let's look at the real life inspiration for that and how I can recreate that. That way, there's something for the modellers and something for the people who prefer the real life stuff.

Edited by HonestTom
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Posted (edited)

Some I've seen are pretty dire, some laughable(Sam's Trains), are some people on an ego trip or what???????????????????????:sungum:

Edited by bike2steam
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If it wasn't for YouTube, or the internet in general, i'm pretty sure my HO Spanish layout would have stopped dead in it's tracks (excuse the pun).

 

The amount of diverse real and model railway content now available on the internet, makes researching and modelling an obscure railway subject more of a possibility, that just over a decade or so ago, would have required either a trip to the country in question, or searching for that elusive one single book on the subject, not to mention actually having to properly learn to read and speak the language of whichever country you're looking at.

 

I say a decade ago, because if I search for my exhibition layouts (or the exhibitions they were displayed at) on YouTube my most recent 2 layouts appear in many videos, but my layout retired in 2010 doesn't come up at all (or the shows they were at). YouTube and the internet have changed a lot in the last 10 years, for better or for worse, but it's undeniable that the amount of useful information that is now accessible out there outweighs all the rubbish. It's just a pity you have to wade through so much guff to find the gems.....

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Ahem *cough* some do upload stuff. Yup its mostly just me talking about a train or something. Haven't really got very far with it. I technically run my stuff on the carpet, but its E-Z track which is great for avoiding fluff. I've only appeared on camera in one of mine, as I'm really shy about it. My channel, and YT as a whole is a mixed bag really, some good stuff, some bad.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfWx-kkerF6iTo91x08tcjw

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Actually, I may have to revise my opinion of Sam's Trains. As I'm going through a slot car phase, I was googling around the subject and stumbled across his vids on Wrenn's Formula 152 slotcar system. Whilst not exactly historical reference material, I found the contents both interesting and informative, and there was plenty of footage of the cars running which is, after all, the point of slot cars (although many makers of slot car vids seem to forget that little point). Even Sam himself was less annoying than he sometimes is. Maybe I'll be less inclined to skip to something else next time.

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I think youtube is fantastic. There's a lot of guff on there but it's been invaluable for me during the lockdowns to see other peoples work and different methods, especially the military modelling stuff. 

Aside from railways it's great for anything from learning about my new camera to finding  bodyweight HIIT's to do when the gyms were shut! I guess you just have to sort the wheat from the chaff. 

My partners kids look at EVERYTHING on youtube and hardly watch "normal " tv at all, I guess it's a sign of the times, a generation of people that cant wait for anything and watch what they want when they want, and I'm guilty of that sometimes too! 

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I've spent more time than I should do on YouTube - fortunately I use it as a stress saver, watching mainly when I've had a difficult few hours under the baseboard wiring servos etc, which has taken up most of my modelling time this year. Another naughty angry servo had to be extracted this morning. 

 

I did initially not like Sam's trains, but it has grown on me. The lack of prototype knowledge is sometimes obvious, but that's coming from an old crusty who spent seven years chasing BR diesels in the 70s. There is very little critical appraisal of errors in models with respect to prototype, but QC issues do raise their head frequently. He's a youngster and I'm sure this will improve with time.  Chadwick model railway though is my firm favourite as Charlie is a WR modeller in more or less the same time frame as me. Jenny Kirk's channel is also regularly watched, I'm impressed by her enthusiasm and work ethic, but remain puzzled by the lack of class 47s and the magnificent class 40 in her diesel fleets! My preference is to run prototypical trains, within a protypical timescale, but can happily live with the "odd" consists seen on YouTube, I just won't run them that's all. My model railway is all about reliving the early mid 1970s for me. 

 

My scenic work, airbrushing, kit building, soldering, DCC fitting, ECoS usage amongst a whole wealth of other DIY stuff, including building a summer house have all been significantly made better due to you tube. Here's one example the superb Boulder Creek rail road 

 

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Making videos is very hard. I have been professionally trained (by Peter Purves among others), and it's much easier to criticise than make your own, so don't be too hard on the amateurs who are trying to share their passion for our hobby.  Of course some of them need improvement and perhaps there is YouTube web where enthusiast discuss mpeg quality lighting and microphones to help them.  Also we learnt to hunt, we learnt to read by sharing stories and it's our natural way of communicating so I don't blame anyone for doing this.  Finding good content is hard on YouTube, but then if we didn't have the internet I for one would not have learnt about DCC, making scenery, improving peco points etc. etc

so what I suggest we do is celebrate and share the good stuff - for me that's things like Everard junction and Chadwick railway and my be  @AY Mod and friends could curate a list of good videos (like they make) and maybe run a vlogging award 

respectfully DeepFat - and here's me having a go at work on an entirely different topic to show you I can also do awful

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2 hours ago, deepfat said:

snipped

 

I can fully concur. I'm not a professional in any way shape or form (actually an IT guy) and video editing is something I only know at a basic level. I don't really get on with online courses so advancing that skill is tricky. I'm trying different things but the YT algorithm is annihilating any chance of views I think. My best video ever is currently at 58k views and its on the Talyllyn 150, a sort of compilation of clips I spent time curating and putting together from my visit there (shameless link here). However my second, its 16k views and its me talking to a poorly lit camera about some Thomas models (link here).

I really don't get what youtube viewers are after apart from watching people gaming or shouting drivel into the camera. Spent a few hours once with Chris Eden-Green and got to see a small part of the immense work he puts into his and I think he deserves far more success than he's given credit for. There are plenty of gems out there, I just feel like I'm not recognised at all.

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I get the positive spin people take with regards to the platform being about sharing ideas and a place to learn skills but I think this is just the glitter into which something has been rolled. 

 

Speaking generally of youtube, my main problem is the culture of youtube and its affects on REAL culture. Youtube seems to be a place where low standards, quick fixes, and narcissism reign. The "hey, look at me" aspect is troubling to me and I wonder if doing something for the sake of doing it, or simply being proud of something is a lost joy. Every moment and acquisition must be filmed, edited and shared with the world if it is to have any meaning. Make no mistake, that amatuer "review" is a status display of some form.

 

Another aspect I find troubling is the living vicariously thing. Although some like to view this positively as "being inspired" I think there is something more sinister. It reminds me of "the secret". If only I keep watching. If only I keep consuming I may find fullfilment (modelling or otherwise). Its the kid in the classroom doing nothing who is "just thinking, sir".

 

If you want to be as good at modelling as those you admire then get modelling. But being as good as someone else seesm a poor reason to have a hobby. You can bet the best guys listed above didnt watch youtube when it was their time, but got stuck in without a screen or camera. If you want to avoid meaningless preamble consider a magazine or book. 

 

Truth is, my main probpem is having a daughter who is growing up with all this stuff. But, having a daughter who loves youtube and enjoys sharing it with me means I can offer some advice . 

1 hour ago, Coldgunner said:

I really don't get what youtube viewers are after apart from watching people gaming or shouting drivel into the camera.

If you want your youtube views to increase, perhaps take inspiration from our gaming youtuber friends or lifestyle types - Consider an annoying vocal quirk like repeating the word "like". Use "literally" only when speaking figuratively. Scream at nothing. Get excited at... nothing. Smash your favourite model over your own head. Slate other youtubers directly. Deviate miles from the original title of the vid. Lie. Flog stuff at the expense of your sincerity and soul. Feign ignorance of everything or even better, know nothing at all. 

 

Remember, share, like and subscribe...or don't. It doesn't matter either way ;-)

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18 hours ago, Coldgunner said:


I really don't get what youtube viewers are after apart from watching people gaming or shouting drivel into the camera. Spent a few hours once with Chris Eden-Green and got to see a small part of the immense work he puts into his and I think he deserves far more success than he's given credit for. There are plenty of gems out there, I just feel like I'm not recognised at all.

 

I've collaborated a bit with Chris myself and he's been a great source of advice on how it works and yes, I agree his stuff deserves more credit. He puts an incredible amount of work into his videos. I think people often don't appreciate how much work goes into something like that. A ten-second shot of a locomotive might require hours of travel and lots of patience, plus years' worth of knowledge and experience to know how to get that shot.

 

It's very difficult to know what YouTube likes. I was bumping along with less than a hundred subscribers for over a year before my channel kicked off. But you can never tell which videos will be popular. You can make a video that will be huge, then you make a video on a similar subject and hardly anyone watches it. Case in point: I've done a few videos on postwar housing developments, which have been really popular. Then I did a video on Thamesmead, which was one that a lot of people requested. I did a lot of research, I spent an entire day down there filming (I clocked up seventeen miles on foot). The edit took days. I revised it and revised it before publication. I was proud of the end result, which being a very self-critical person, is rare for me. And... it did okay. Some people watched it. It wasn't a hit. I wouldn't say people disliked it, but it was a disappointment.

 

The trouble is, you can't really complain about something like that. A part of me wants to grab viewers by the collar and say, "You see that? Do you know how hard it was to get that footage? You'll sit down and watch it, my lad, and you'll click that like button!" But if people don't want to watch, you can't make them. You just have to learn what you can and keep going.

 

19 hours ago, westernviscount said:

 

Speaking generally of youtube, my main problem is the culture of youtube and its affects on REAL culture. Youtube seems to be a place where low standards, quick fixes, and narcissism reign. The "hey, look at me" aspect is troubling to me and I wonder if doing something for the sake of doing it, or simply being proud of something is a lost joy. Every moment and acquisition must be filmed, edited and shared with the world if it is to have any meaning. Make no mistake, that amatuer "review" is a status display of some form.

I don't see how this is specifically a YouTube phenomenon. You might as well argue, why exhibit layouts? Why write articles or publish books? Why, for that matter, post on forums? We could go the whole hog - why even discuss your hobby with your mates? Isn't that also deviating from the concept of doing something for the sake of doing it? All that's changed is that these days, the technology exists to make publication easier.

 

19 hours ago, westernviscount said:

 

Another aspect I find troubling is the living vicariously thing. Although some like to view this positively as "being inspired" I think there is something more sinister. It reminds me of "the secret". If only I keep watching. If only I keep consuming I may find fullfilment (modelling or otherwise). Its the kid in the classroom doing nothing who is "just thinking, sir".

Armchair modellers have existed since long before the Internet. It's just that before there were online resources, they were limited to reading magazines and visiting exhibitions.

 

19 hours ago, westernviscount said:

 

If you want to be as good at modelling as those you admire then get modelling. But being as good as someone else seesm a poor reason to have a hobby. You can bet the best guys listed above didnt watch youtube when it was their time, but got stuck in without a screen or camera. If you want to avoid meaningless preamble consider a magazine or book. 

How is reading a book or magazine any better than watching a video on YouTube? I'm going to be quite honest here, I'm not seeing any arguments here that are specific to YouTube. The issue seems to be that you object to people who passively consume the hobby without making models themselves, which is really nothing to do with the medium.

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11 minutes ago, woodenhead said:

Some channels literally are about sh!t

It's compellingly watchable, the cr8p these guys put up with and the state some people allow their houses to get into is beyond describable.

 

It's fascinating how many different niches there are. I didn't imagine there was a channel specifically devoted to drain unblocking, but I'm really not surprised. Not something I'd watch over dinner, though...

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1 minute ago, HonestTom said:

It's fascinating how many different niches there are. I didn't imagine there was a channel specifically devoted to drain unblocking, but I'm really not surprised. Not something I'd watch over dinner, though...

Definitely not, I got hooked yesterday whilst waiting for some work to complete on my computer, I was appalled at times by what they had to do.

 

But the temperament of the two guys is excellent given what they are dealing with, I couldn't do it.

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Whilst I haven't published any model railway vids, I occasionally get energetic and film aspects of our pottery business to post online. Given that the most popular video so far has been of a minor disaster when a big mould wasn't quite as well sealed as I thought it was and consequently dumped 100 kg of porcelain slip on the workshop floor, I've come to the conclusion that what people like is seeing stuff go wrong. 

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I don't understand why people are complaining about YouTube culture.  I don't watch gaming videos, I can't see the point of them, or videos of people filming their food/"pranks"/trips to the loo/unboxing a loco/model reviews, so the YouTube algorithm doesn't try and serve them up for me.  I only know about the "u ok hun?" generation through other media, and whilst I know YouTube has these types all over the place, I neither actively nor passively seek them out.  I use YouTube a lot, but I am selective about what I search for, I am selective in the recommendations served up by the YT artificial intelligence, I use the "block" tool to make sure that I don't get cross-contamination recommendations from videos watched by people I follow on YouTube (mind you it works both ways, I gather one friend who I follow does get spammed with Eurovision Song Contest recommendations that I've watched...) so I manage to use the site efficiently, enjoyably and without a lot of grief.  If by any fluke a suspect video gets under the defence radar you can usually spot them by a complete lack of taste in the typefaces and pictures used to "promote" their onanistic presentation.  Anyone lacking so much self awareness to upload such tom-tit will also lack any aptitude for design quality or graphical ability.

So, again, I just don't understand what some of you seem to be doing wrong if you are constantly watching self indulgent, narcissistic or irritating videos to the extent you feel the need to condemn the whole concept when the facility can be "driven" to largely by-pass such dross.  As for the wider impact on society, there have always been airheads, narcissists and idiots, it just seems there are more of them today when actually all that is happening is they have a new way of showing off their waste of a fertilised egg status.  We've been marinating in a gene puddle for many decades now the shallowness of which isn't changing dramatically.

Edited by wombatofludham
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4 hours ago, HonestTom said:

The trouble is, you can't really complain about something like that. A part of me wants to grab viewers by the collar and say, "You see that? Do you know how hard it was to get that footage? You'll sit down and watch it, my lad, and you'll click that like button!" But if people don't want to watch, you can't make them. You just have to learn what you can and keep going.

Yes  I think you can complain about this if what you think is valuable is not being taken the way you want it to. The complaints may fall on deaf ears but that is no reason to not express your disappointment. Sometimes it isnt your fault things fall flat. Be aware that the "learning what you can" can become playing to the gallery or worse still, dumbing down. 

 

4 hours ago, HonestTom said:

You might as well argue, why exhibit layouts? Why write articles or publish books? Why, for that matter, post on forums? We could go the whole hog - why even discuss your hobby with your mates?

 

Indeed, I am sure there might be arguments against those things if one took them all as vehicles for self promotion. Possibly, some display their layouts for plaudits but I have not met any. It seems to me the exhibitor does so for the love of it. Whether exhibiting a layout is actually comparable to youtubing is debatable unless the exhibitor keeps a record of numbers and length of layout views and determines the success or not of his or her layout based on this metric:-) 

 

4 hours ago, HonestTom said:

How is reading a book or magazine any better than watching a video on YouTube?

I don't really know, but it is in my opinion. Books and articles are usually edited and scrutinised by proffesional writers by trade. In my humble opinion, the written word is more absorbing than video. Reading surely engages more faculties and is an active process whereas viewing is more passive. 

 

Also Most mags and all books are published by professionals with knowledge and  credentials. They are going concerns whom employ a staff. Most mags and books have multiple contributers whom are paid for their efforts. Yes, there are sales figures etc but they are unbenownst to me when deciding which one to buy. None of them land uninvited at my door or fling themselves from the shelves under my nose.

 

2 hours ago, wombatofludham said:

I don't understand why people are complaining about YouTube culture.

Fair enough. I don't think most people are complaining about this by the looks of it...just me mostly ;-) This thread is drastically tilted towards youtube being a positive thing which is of no surprise to me. This doesnt preclude me from continuin to complain about youtube culture generally and in relation to the hobby. I dislike and disagree with the degree of consumerism and "unboxery" which is not limited to explicit proponants of the form, but also is present in subtle ways in virtually all the so called "good" examples cited above. 

 

Also, despite the youtube driving skills which can be learnt, there seems to be an element of viewing curation without full consent, especially to those not so expert in these areas. There is a reason some tech giant CEOs send their children to schools where tech is banned. "Never get high on your own supply" I believe is the saying. 

 

All this said, youtube is going nowhere, complaints or not.  

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4 hours ago, PatB said:

Whilst I haven't published any model railway vids, I occasionally get energetic and film aspects of our pottery business to post online. Given that the most popular video so far has been of a minor disaster when a big mould wasn't quite as well sealed as I thought it was and consequently dumped 100 kg of porcelain slip on the workshop floor, I've come to the conclusion that what people like is seeing stuff go wrong. 

 

This reminds me of a film I think is called holyman with Eddie Murphy. He gets involved with a phone in of some sort and suggests that if he were to say "phone this number to watch me sculpt a replica venus di milo or phone this number to watch me destroy the studio with an axe" most would phone in to watch the destruction. 

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