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Does anyone know the manufacturer of the wheels in old k's locomotive kits? Or were they made by them? 

I've got an old kit here but the wheels are rusty.

Any advice would be welcome.

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I think they made the parts themselves, but in some kits they had Romfords.

 

Cleaning the wheels.

 

Firstly give them a quick clean with WD40. Then use a fibreglass scratch pen (usually about £5 from your local model shop). Even places like Halford sell them,

 

Link to show you what I mean.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gaugemaster-GM-GM633-Glass-Fibre-Pencil/dp/B00PDYZQ98/ref=pd_lpo_229_t_2/262-0755859-9663922?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00PDYZQ98&pd_rd_r=2aa057c1-c70e-41f0-89c4-292209173407&pd_rd_w=Y4B8g&pd_rd_wg=fwBX3&pf_rd_p=d05bd3be-6ad4-4468-b3fb-b2079408c7ac&pf_rd_r=Q7D7MVDF44DK5PGNFM5Q&psc=1&refRID=Q7D7MVDF44DK5PGNFM5Q

 

 

 

I got the WD40 tip from the Gibson website as some of their wheels also suffer occasional rusting. Usually it's just a bit of surface moisture left over from the manufacturing process that rusts.

 

http://www.alangibsonworkshop.com/FAQ.html

 

 

Jason

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The WD40 tip is to clean 'caramelized' preservative that looks like rust.  If it is actually rust the fibre glass brush will remove it followed by a light coat of WD40 or thicker oil to prevent further corrosion.

 

Fibre glass brushes are useful for many tasks so good to get anyway.....

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Fibreglass brushes/pens have their uses but I don't like them for cleaning wheels or track, as they are abrasive and leave microscratches on the surface, which will pick up crud and interfere with pickup efficiency. I'd clean the wheels as thoroughly as possible with any sort of liquid that will lift the dirt, and be very wary of WD40, which is not a thing you want in proximity to some plastics.  Don't put any sort of oil on your wheel rims and tyres, as it will prevent current pickup and attract crud, not to mention causing wheelslip.

Edited by The Johnster
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5 hours ago, Steamport Southport said:

I think they made the parts themselves, but in some kits they had Romfords.

 

Cleaning the wheels.

 

Firstly give them a quick clean with WD40. Then use a fibreglass scratch pen (usually about £5 from your local model shop). Even places like Halford sell them,

 

Link to show you what I mean.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gaugemaster-GM-GM633-Glass-Fibre-Pencil/dp/B00PDYZQ98/ref=pd_lpo_229_t_2/262-0755859-9663922?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00PDYZQ98&pd_rd_r=2aa057c1-c70e-41f0-89c4-292209173407&pd_rd_w=Y4B8g&pd_rd_wg=fwBX3&pf_rd_p=d05bd3be-6ad4-4468-b3fb-b2079408c7ac&pf_rd_r=Q7D7MVDF44DK5PGNFM5Q&psc=1&refRID=Q7D7MVDF44DK5PGNFM5Q

 

 

 

I got the WD40 tip from the Gibson website as some of their wheels also suffer occasional rusting. Usually it's just a bit of surface moisture left over from the manufacturing process that rusts.

 

http://www.alangibsonworkshop.com/FAQ.html

 

 

Jason

I'd already gone old school with WD40 - haven't got fibre glass pens at the moment - they got trashed in a 'paint' incident! 

Must get some more. Good one about Gibson - just sent query about new wheels - they respond really quickly, it's brilliant!

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1 hour ago, The Johnster said:

Fibreglass brushes/pens have their uses but I don't like them for cleaning wheels or track, as they are abrasive and leave microscratches on the surface, which will pick up crud and interfere with pickup efficiency. I'd clean the wheels as thoroughly as possible with any sort of liquid that will lift the dirt, and be very wary of WD40, which is not a thing you want in proximity to some plastics.  Don't put any sort of oil on your wheel rims and tyres, as it will prevent current pickup and attract crud, not to mention causing wheelslip.

After using WD 40 I do clean the wheels. I haven't had any problems with it if used carefully and sparingly. Abrasives ... I'm kind of with you, but sometimes.... It needs to be done. 

Thanks.

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Maybe I should add a disclaimer.

 

I mean K's Kit steel wheels and similar. Not your brand new shiny RTR models.  Be careful with those as they shouldn't be going rusty. I certainly wouldn't be attacking them with anything abrasive.

 

 

I had the same problem with a GWR Prairie bought half built. I thought the chassis would be just going in the bin. After clean up it was fine. Must finish it one day.

 

 

Jason

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Wheels were not Keyser's better products. The early ones which were self quartered were quite coarse and the newer versions with the plastic inserts were prone to be fitted badly by the modeller, but with careful fitting do work, but as they were steel prone to rusting

 

Many of us upgraded the kits by fitting then Romford's (now Markits) or going for Gibsons, both of where were perceived as superior.

 

Out of interest which kit are you building ?

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5 hours ago, hayfield said:

Wheels were not Keyser's better products. The early ones which were self quartered were quite coarse and the newer versions with the plastic inserts were prone to be fitted badly by the modeller, but with careful fitting do work, but as they were steel prone to rusting

 

Many of us upgraded the kits by fitting then Romford's (now Markits) or going for Gibsons, both of where were perceived as superior.

 

Out of interest which kit are you building ?

14xx picked up for a fiver at a charity shop.

 

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My second or third Keyser kit, actually a few years after fitted an etched compensated chassis, whilst the footplate is a bit short its one of their better and popular kits. Great buy at a fiver

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6 hours ago, Il Grifone said:

Take care with the plastic wheel centres. They are quite fragile, especially the D-shaped centre which sets the quartering.

If they are 'rather' old then the plastic may well be brittle.  A new set of Markits wheels is probably the best option.  Easy to fit, self quartering and all metal.

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They must be old. They stopped manufacture of K's kits in the eighties. The plastic could well be brittle by now. Markits wheels are probably a better option, but could cost more than the kit is worth. (A matter of opinion....)

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46 minutes ago, Il Grifone said:

They must be old. They stopped manufacture of K's kits in the eighties. The plastic could well be brittle by now. Markits wheels are probably a better option, but could cost more than the kit is worth. (A matter of opinion....)

 

Certainly if in a K's box its quite old, but early unbuilt and built examples from the 60's still are very common

 

Then various enterprises culminating in a lot of the range ending up with NuCast, which its self has been taken over

 

As for the cost of Markit wheels, yes they are expensive, but they work. Many a good kit has been rescued by using these wheels. There was (and is?) a cheaper alternative in the Scalecraft (?) range, though the range is quite limited. Also seemingly an endless supply of Romford wheels on eBay, but be careful. Some plain wheels are plain Mazac, they work but do not have nickel/stainless steel tyres, also the crankpin holes may need drilling and tapping on early ones

 

Then of course there are Alan Gibson wheels, in my opinion looking better, certainly cheaper but great care is needed in fitting

 

As for how much a kit is worth, firstly look at the price of a new kit. Then look at the cost of a well built and painted kit. Certainly paying a fiver for a complete kit/loco must be excellent value in anyone's terms.  

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24 minutes ago, hayfield said:

 

Certainly if in a K's box its quite old, but early unbuilt and built examples from the 60's still are very common

 

Then various enterprises culminating in a lot of the range ending up with NuCast, which its self has been taken over

 

As for the cost of Markit wheels, yes they are expensive, but they work. Many a good kit has been rescued by using these wheels. There was (and is?) a cheaper alternative in the Scalecraft (?) range, though the range is quite limited. Also seemingly an endless supply of Romford wheels on eBay, but be careful. Some plain wheels are plain Mazac, they work but do not have nickel/stainless steel tyres, also the crankpin holes may need drilling and tapping on early ones

 

Then of course there are Alan Gibson wheels, in my opinion looking better, certainly cheaper but great care is needed in fitting

 

As for how much a kit is worth, firstly look at the price of a new kit. Then look at the cost of a well built and painted kit. Certainly paying a fiver for a complete kit/loco must be excellent value in anyone's terms.  

 

I think you mean ScaleLink.

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1 hour ago, hayfield said:

 

Thank you I could remember the Scale part of the name, are they any good ? and are they still available?

 

People reported problems with some of the early production. Seemed to be OK after that.

 

Think that they are still available but Bob Wyatt is winding things down for retirement. He is over 80 now!

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4 hours ago, Il Grifone said:

They must be old. They stopped manufacture of K's kits in the eighties. The plastic could well be brittle by now. Markits wheels are probably a better option, but could cost more than the kit is worth. (A matter of opinion....)

 

Available until about ten years ago from Sherwood Models though still with the plastic wheels. Made to order by someone called Autocom. You also had West Coast Models selling them in package deals with better quality wheels and motors.

 

Obviously now made by Nucast Partners.

 

What's a kit worth? Try getting a K Class or Turbomotive. You are looking at over £100 easily. Seen them go for over £200.

 

 

Jason

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5 minutes ago, Steamport Southport said:

 

Available until about ten years ago from Sherwood Models though still with the plastic wheels. Made to order by someone called Autocom. You also had West Coast Models selling them in package deals with better quality wheels and motors.

 

Obviously now made by Nucast Partners.

 

What's a kit worth? Try getting a K Class or Turbomotive. You are looking at over £100 easily. Seen them go for over £200.

 

 

Jason

 

I did say, "Could"!  :)

 

Older Romford/Markits wheels have alloy tyres (bin) and an excess of spokes.

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Depends what it is though.

 

If there is a decent RTR model available the price comes down. If there isn't then expect to pay a premium.

 

Funnily enough the first one I bought was a 14XX. Reduced in Hattons as nobody wanted them as the Airfix version was available. It was that or the J72 which was also reduced. I had a Mainline J72 though, so went with the 14XX.

 

 

Jason

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image.png.e38506abed97ab782eb3375a1e156a26.png

This just sold on eBay for £75 but is incomplete, there are some wheels missing and maybe a whole card.  This would cost quite a lot for new wheels.....

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