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Paint for older Hornby locos.


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Hi all.

I'm new on this website so, if I'm in the wrong place, please redirect me.

 

My problem is this: I've recently purchased an old R080 Hornby Class 29 BR diesel (with the 'sad eyes' windows). One of the driver's cab doors needed some touching up so, using various brands of acryllic i.e. Tamiya, Vallejo, Humbrol etc., I tried but couldn't get a match. She's a lovely runner and although she is not a true representative of the former prototype i.e. headlights not in correct position, she is in very good condition, and I have even added some detail using old b&w piccies from the 'net so, I need to know how close I can get to the colouring of the plastic body that is used by Hornby.

 

P.S. It is plain BR green all over and not like Hornby's recent model of two tone green. Any advice would be very much appreciated. 

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My advice would be to repaint or at least revarnish the entire loco, since even if you can match the exact colour to that which the loco has faded to, which is by no means certain, the finish will be different.  Worse, you will be aware of it and it will stand out to you like a sore thumb.  I appreciate this is probably not what you want to read, bit I reckon it is the best advice for the long term.  Incidentally, Hornby’s rendition of BR green diesel livery on models of this period  is at ‘some variance’ with the actual shade, being somewhat too bright
 

An alternative might be to heavily weather the loco.  

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The R080 is one of the original releases and the body is self-coloured plastic coated in a matt lacquer. So if you want to match the original finish, rather than repainting you can cut back to the plastic base colour and then just matt varnish.

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Hi.

 

Firstly, my response to 'crompton 33': Thanks for the info but I have read on other forums that Railmatch colours are aimed at representing the prototype, and not the actual shades used by different model manufacturers. There are so many shades of green by other paint makers that you can only know which is closest by purchasing one of each. Not a good idea.

 

Secondly, my response to 'The Johnster': What I'm looking for is suggestions regarding paint names and colours and not varnish. I have my wagons heavily weathered but, with certain locos, I like to keep them looking 'clean'. Thanks anyway.

 

Finally, my response to 'andyman7': I think I will give your idea a try as if it doesn't work, I will only have to resort to painting it which was the original intention anyway. We will see what transpires. 

 

Thankyou everyone for trying to help. It is very much appreciated and I look forward to future exchanges on this forum.

 

Regards,

 

Paul.

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Take the model to your local Dulux paint centre (other brands are available) who have a paint matching scanner. They will scan your model and suggest a matching colour. You can buy a sample tin  (matt only) for about £5.

Edited by 21C1
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41 minutes ago, Analogue Man said:

Secondly, my response to 'The Johnster': What I'm looking for is suggestions regarding paint names and colours and not varnish. I have my wagons heavily weathered but, with certain locos, I like to keep them looking 'clean'. Thanks anyway.

 

 

The point that 'The Johnster' was making is that the model is not painted as such - what you see is the colour of the bare plastic. It will there fore be difficult / impossible to match that effect with ANY paint.

 

Your best bet is a complete repaint.

 

CJI.

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I think your best bet is a full repaint even if you match the model's colour because you won't be able to match the finish and the patching will stand out.  A repaint also gives you the opportunity to correct the Hornby green and, if you want, to matt or gloss the finish to your tasted, and to renumber with transfers. 

 

Removing the laquer as andyman7 suggests is a viable alternative, but requires a good deal of care to achieve an even finish without damaging the body plastic colour.  If you can match the Hornby colour, which in my view is pointless as you are only repeating an original error which you have the chance to correct, the model will still need to be revarnished to achieve an even finish, by which time you may as well have done the full repaint!  OTOH, if you are considering 'restoring' the model for selling on, this may be the way to go.

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To andyman7.

 

I took your advice and Bingo, spot on. I started with a Peco rail cleaner but that was too cumbersome and abrasive, so I reverted to a wooden cocktail stick slanted at a 45deg angle so as not to scratch the surface. Moving it around very carefully and with much patience, I eventually removed everything that shouldn't be there. I was going to mix some matt and satin varnish but once I had brushed off the residue and given her a wet wipe, you wouldn't even notice the difference between the door and the rest of the body, so I decided to leave it at that as you could easily overdo it. Job done, thanks to your advice, so I owe you a pint my friend.

 

As for everyone else on here, I thank you for your input.

 

To crompton 33 (a lovely loco indeed), I have railmatch paints but I no longer use enamel unless it's an emergency. I find acrylic so much more flexible and if enamel had been the problem on my Class 29, it would have been much harder to remove. Also, if the consistency of acrylic bothers you, you can easily thin it out with water, and then apply a 2nd coat if anything shows through. Watercolour etc. painting is another hobby of mine, so I am at ease with that particular medium. Most modern day artists have now ditched oils in favour of acrylic.

 

As for 21C1's suggestion, I won't be visiting my local Dulux centre in B&Q's as I have no intention of decorating my loco with wallpaper, no matter how original it may appear.

 

Once again, many thanks to everyone for their advice.

 

Paul.

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I am a fellow fan of acrylics; much easier to use in all respects, brush cleaning is less of a chore, and, in view of the point that my modelling takes place within the living area of my home and other people have to be considered besides The Johnster, the smell is not unpleasant.

 

Glad your problem has been satisfactorily resolved, Paul.

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