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TRACTION 265


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We start this issue of TRACTION with a look at the neighbouring stations of Manchester Victoria and Manchester Exchange. Whilst Exchange has long been closed, Victoria remains a major station albeit totally different in appearance compared to the 1980s. David Clough’s images take us back to this once fascinating location with its varied traffic.

 

Former railwayman John Baker returns with his account of the development of loco liveries at his home depot at Glasgow Eastfield, this time concentrating on the ‘large logo’ period.

 

David Hayes starts a new series about the UKF fertiliser trains and reveals that UKF did not mean United Kingdom Fertilisers! Bill Jamieson describes his impressions of his visits to the Woodhead Line concentrating on the last day of operations.

 

If you have ever wondered why rail travel is so safe Colin Boocock’s article ‘Cracks, documents and standards’ will go some way to explaining this.

 

The days of locomotive haulage on the Cambrian are long gone but we can relive them through photographs. Gavin Morrison’s photo feature recalls the last few summer Saturday’s when pairs of Class 25s brought long trains of Mark 1 coaches to Aberystwyth.

 

TRACTION MODELLING features a superb N gauge layout, Bluebell Summit; it’s based on the West of England main line in the blue period complete with ‘Westerns’, Class 50s and HSTs. It features stunning scenery, including a large viaduct, and full length trains. Our review section looks at the marvellous new Bachmann Class 24/0.

 

 

Cover 265.jpg

Edited by steverabone
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Another enjoyable issue, definitely a big bonus to the Gold membership! Particularly liked the features on Cambrian 25s and UKF trains - looking forward to part 2 of that, and the promised article on variations of the UKF Palvan wagons.

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I'm glad to hear that you enjoyed this issue. I really enjoyed researching for the Cambrian Class 25 articles as I missed out on travelling on the Cambrian between 1965 and the 1990s.

 

Traction 266 preparation is well underway and I can confirm that both UKF articles will be in that issue.

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Posted (edited)

I've  just found this picture in my file of 25 178 and 25 192 backing down onto the 10:10 London to Aberystwyth train at Wolverhampton, on 1st September 1984. From the article, it's apparent they later failed at Welshpool, causing considerable disruption!

On the left, 312 203 is leaving, bound for Preston.

 

 

 

1984-09-01 Wolverhampton.JPG

Edited by Ramblin Rich
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Just working my way through this edition. Really enjoyed the Manchester Victoria/Exchange article as it used to be my regular haunt in the early 80's. Its clear now what I used to take for granted was in fact a fairly special location. I only saw the hive of activity on Platform 11 filling the newspaper trains once after a much delayed Merrymaker trip to Scotland and now regret not going back.

 

The newspaper trains from Manchester would make a great article if not already been done. 

Edited by flapland
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On 01/08/2021 at 19:44, steverabone said:

Anybody who is interested in writing about this subject please contact me.

P1200766.JPG.f7159d776dcec4a03d07708dad10be6e.JPG

Hi Steve, I modified a couple of Lima PWA's recently to represent the original curtain side variant, could do a write up of the conversion if you are interested?

Cheers

James

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A really enjoyable edition again.  I was especially interested in the UKF article; I don't think, till now, I really appreciated just how comprehensive the service was since all I really ever saw of it at the time were the Andover and Gillingham portions whilst they were being rearranged at Salisbury. I was quite surprised to see just how many locations saw traffic.   Looking forward to the next part.

 

Best wishes,

 

Paul

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Yes it is a fascinating story and one which the author, David Hayes, had to do and enormous amount of research to discover how complex these flows were. I'm sure you will enjoy part 2 and the collection of images with it. There is also a feature about the wagons used in the next issue.

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