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The width of a plank of wood


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Yes, a random topic title. 

 

Can any of you help to confirm what size you think the width of the planks on the wooden doors on the attached photo are. I think they are 6" but could they be 9". Its all to help with making a model of the building. 

 

1698836314_WMhut.JPG.48fc7bf998fc8e2539d06185caf15e62.JPG

Thanks in advance

 

Duncan

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There are eight planks. At 6" that would make each door 4' wide.  9" would make them 6' wide.

 

The doors look to be twice as high as they are wide. Given that the standard platform height is 3', I suspect the door height is nearer to 8' than 12'.

 

If the choice is between 6" and 9", I would go for 6". 

 

As @micknich2003 suggests, draw it to scale to see what looks right.

Edited by Colin_McLeod
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I can't give you a conclusive answer either, but I'd very much doubt that they'd be more than 6": I think they are likely to be less.  The door on the left, seems to have eight planks, so if the planks were 6" wide, then that would imply that the door is four foot wide.  That's a fairly wide door, given that most standard width doors are between about 30" and three feet wide.   I'd therefore suggest that the planks are possibly just 4" wide, which would give the door a width of three feet.

 

Look at the door height.  I'd say that the door is more than twice as tall as it is wide.  I can't see a reason for a door that is more than eight foot high.  A typical door would be between six and seven foot, which I think implies a standard width door.  It also opens out onto the platform, which I think is likely to be about six feet wide.  If the door was much more than three foot wide, then there wouldn't be much platform when the door was being opened.

 

My guess (and that is all it is), is that the planks are probably 4" wide.

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28 minutes ago, Colin_McLeod said:

There are eight planks. At 6" that would make each door 4' wide.  9" would make them 6' wide.

 

The doors look to be twice as high as they are wide. Given that the standard platform height is 3', I suspect the door height is nearer to 8' than 12'.

 

If the choice is between 6" and 9", I would go for 6". 

 

As @micknich2003 suggests, draw it to scale to see what looks right.

 

 

Exactly my thought process. 

 

My guess would be 5 1/2" planks as they would probably have been cut down from 6" and had a tongue and groove fitted making the overall plank face less. 

 

The other useful element in the photo is the white gate which will be 4' tall for that SR type. This proportionally would make the doors around 6' 9" tall.

 

Working on the doors being roughly 2:1 height to width, and there being a smidge less than 7.5 plank widths in each door, this also gives the plank width at about 5.5".

 

That's my guesswork anyway...

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26 minutes ago, Dungrange said:

I can't give you a conclusive answer either, but I'd very much doubt that they'd be more than 6": I think they are likely to be less.  The door on the left, seems to have eight planks, so if the planks were 6" wide, then that would imply that the door is four foot wide.  That's a fairly wide door, given that most standard width doors are between about 30" and three feet wide.   I'd therefore suggest that the planks are possibly just 4" wide, which would give the door a width of three feet.

 

Look at the door height.  I'd say that the door is more than twice as tall as it is wide.  I can't see a reason for a door that is more than eight foot high.  A typical door would be between six and seven foot, which I think implies a standard width door.  It also opens out onto the platform, which I think is likely to be about six feet wide.  If the door was much more than three foot wide, then there wouldn't be much platform when the door was being opened.

 

My guess (and that is all it is), is that the planks are probably 4" wide.

 

I'd go along with this assessment. In fact, I wonder if the planks might even have been 3" wide.

 

Just as an aside, this link "popped up" in a recent Google search:

 

southernrailwaywestofyeovil.blogspot.com/2011/11/west-moors.html

 

I don't know if it might be of any interest.

 

 

Huw.

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12 minutes ago, Huw Griffiths said:

 

I'd go along with this assessment. In fact, I wonder if the planks might even have been 3" wide.

 

Just as an aside, this link "popped up" in a recent Google search:

 

southernrailwaywestofyeovil.blogspot.com/2011/11/west-moors.html

 

I don't know if it might be of any interest.

 

 

Huw.

 

That's a useful photo as it shows the building in context with the station building which looks to have a standard 6'6" high door. Looking across to the shed, and allowing for perspective/ vanishing point, the doors there are marginally taller - somewhere between 3" to 6". 

 

rps20210913_220519.jpg.252bb6da51cd5f65f4976e96a02197a8.jpg

 

I would however disagree with the door planks being 3" wide - the planks on the gate are normally about that and the door planks are about twice that.

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Having hung a fair few like those the boards are ex 5 x1 either T&G or more likely just square edge this means the doors are approx 3' wide giving a 6' opening which was fairly common.

 

I would not scale off the door in the station building, that is not  6'6" but more likely to be 6'3" (75") at most. If it were 6'6" the adjacent window would imply a ceiling height in excess of 8' which would be very unusual in such a building.

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1 hour ago, 2ManySpams said:

 

That's a useful photo as it shows the building in context with the station building which looks to have a standard 6'6" high door. 

 

The link is interesting as it shows the shed in white and the station building in a dark colour, and another the other way round, as well as the shed being absent later.  Unfortunately it doesn't give you the dates.

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9 hours ago, chris p bacon said:

Having hung a fair few like those the boards are ex 5 x1 either T&G or more likely just square edge this means the doors are approx 3' wide giving a 6' opening which was fairly common.

 

I would not scale off the door in the station building, that is not  6'6" but more likely to be 6'3" (75") at most. If it were 6'6" the adjacent window would imply a ceiling height in excess of 8' which would be very unusual in such a building.

 

I did wonder in retrospect whether the station door was less than 6'6". Looking at other photos this morning I would agree with your thoughts on 6'3" for that.

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Using GIMP to reduce the impact of the perspective I got this image.  The NLS map seemed to suggest that the hut is around 18 feet long, so I have assumed that might be correct, and the height to eaves around 8 feet.

image.png.161ed9f9d49d68c187c71e4ef83ff14e.png

This gives the width of the door as around 4' 6", and the vertical planks about 6¾ - 7 inches, in visible width - they might be T&G or similar.  I'm not sure about this fixation with 3, 6 or 9 inch planks - they didn't get their timber from B&Q - although the rather massive looking horizontal timbers on the door that is off its hinges does come in at 9".

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6 minutes ago, Nick Holliday said:

I'm not sure about this fixation with 3, 6 or 9 inch planks

 

Quite so. The tongue-and-groove board used on Midland / LMS conversions of old carriages to tool or mess vans was 6⅝" wide (on the visible face) by ⅜" thick; with the tongue, 6⅞" wide over the tongue. This might be planed down from 7" x ½".

 

Note that the boards at either end of the door are narrower, which possibly hints at tongue-and-grove.

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1 hour ago, Nick Holliday said:

I'm not sure about this fixation with 3, 6 or 9 inch planks - they didn't get their timber from B&Q - although the rather massive looking horizontal timbers on the door that is off its hinges does come in at 9".

 

Timber has always, and still is in imperial. It might be sold as 150mm or 100mm but it's still 6" and 4".  3M lengths are 9', 3.6M are 11' etc.

 

Softwood Boards for importation were 5"/6"/7" etc rough sawn, depending on the timber quality this could then be converted down to PSE (Planed square edge) or T&G hence finished timber sizes of 5 3/4" or 6 5/8''

The thickness would reduce correspondantly from 1" rough sawn to 3/4" planed. Imported board thicknesses were divisible by 1/2" (1'/ 1 1/2"/ 2' etc)

 

The ledges (horizontals) and braces (diagonals) on the door are very unlikely to be 9", I suspect them to be 6".

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1 hour ago, Nearholmer said:

The horizontal axis is exaggerated in that representation - look at the lamp and the target sign, both look horizontally stretched.

GIMP only deals with things in the same plane, anything else is prone to distortion.  In this case the lamp is a long way from that plane, and, looking at the original photo, I would suggest that the sign is slightly on the skew, although I may have under-estimated the height to eaves as well.

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1 hour ago, Compound2632 said:

 

Quite so. The tongue-and-groove board used on Midland / LMS conversions of old carriages to tool or mess vans was 6⅝" wide (on the visible face) by ⅜" thick; with the tongue, 6⅞" wide over the tongue. This might be planed down from 7" x ½".

 

Note that the boards at either end of the door are narrower, which possibly hints at tongue-and-grove.

 

For rolling stock it would be a much better quality of timber (Hardwood or semi hardwood) which could be much thinner than softwood used for joinery.  The teak panelling on early GN coaches is only 5/8" or thereabouts thick, if it were softwood it would have to be 1"+ to have anywhere near the strength of the Teak.

Edited by chris p bacon
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5 minutes ago, chris p bacon said:

 

Timber has always, and still is in imperial. It might be sold as 150mm or 100mm but it's still 6" and 4".  3M lengths are 9', 3.6M are 11' etc.

 

Softwood Boards for importation were 5"/6"/7" etc rough sawn, depending on the timber quality this could then be converted down to PSE (Planed square edge) or T&G hence finished timber sizes of 5 3/4" or 6 5/8''

The thickness would reduce correspondingly from 1" rough sawn to 3/4" planed. Imported board thicknesses were divisible by 1/2" (1'/ 1 1/2"/ 2' etc)

 

The ledges (horizontals) and braces (diagonals) on the door are very unlikely to be 9", I suspect them to be 6".

When the hut was built I suspect that the timber was prepared either by the LSWR or the contractor using larger timber sections, and not even necessarily imported, and would be sawn to whatever size suited the project, or the optimum reduction of round timber to planks and beams. Imperial or metric units of measurement don't make any difference.

Looking at the photo again the ledges remain at 9", otherwise the door height would be only 5' 4", and the braces are 3".

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