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The width of a plank of wood


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4 minutes ago, Nick Holliday said:

When the hut was built I suspect that the timber was prepared either by the LSWR or the contractor using larger timber sections, and not even necessarily imported, and would be sawn to whatever size suited the project, or the optimum reduction of round timber to planks and beams. Imperial or metric units of measurement don't make any difference.

Looking at the photo again the ledges remain at 9", otherwise the door height would be only 5' 4", and the braces are 3".

 

During the 19thC the UK didn't have enough softwood for construction of the railways etc so the majority was imported, Timber has always been converted along the same principles as it was air died.

The LSWR/contractor would have been purchasing timber that was already converted and dried to be suitable for joinery.

 

9" ledges equate to an 8' door, a most unusual opening size for what is essentially a cheaply constructed shed.  The likely door height is 6'6" (or thereabouts) as any higher and the braces would be positioned differently between the ledges.

 

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15 minutes ago, black and decker boy said:

The white wicket fence should be in region of 4ft high. The suggests the doors are 6ft or so long.

 

id say the vertical planks are 4” with the horizontal battens 6”

 

A thin 9” batten of softwood would be prone to warping 

SR fencing was between 4' 4½" and 5' 0" tall, which matches my image.  It is very dangerous to scale horizontal dimensions from vertical ones.

See my previous answer regarding the sizes of vertical boards and the door ledges and braces. 

Why do you think it's a thin batten?  It is probably 2 or 3" thick, and if you've ever tried to lift a length of 9" x 3" you would be in for a surprise!

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  • RMweb Gold
6 minutes ago, Nick Holliday said:

SR fencing was between 4' 4½" and 5' 0" tall, which matches my image

 

Looking at the adjacent windows and doors it's unlikely that fence is higher than 4'.  At 4'4" in perspective that would put the window head at 8-9'

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1 hour ago, chris p bacon said:

 

Looking at the adjacent windows and doors it's unlikely that fence is higher than 4'.  At 4'4" in perspective that would put the window head at 8-9'

 

Agree. The drawings I have for that type of SR gate say it should be 4' tall. Other types of fencing are indeed taller but that's not what is in the photo.

 

 

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I'll try again with a blow up of the top of one of the doors.  Count the courrugations in the roof.  There 16 of them.  The corrugations in corrugated iron are usually 3 inches wide therefore the single door is 4 foot wide.    Divide by the number of planks and you have the width of a plank.

 

Image2.jpg

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Thanks for all your help and comments on various sizes which help in the overall picture. ,

 

The height of the first door in the main building is 6'3 based on counting bricks, whereas the second further along was 6'9 (lord alone knows why) The height of the top of the windows was 8'2 again based on brick counting. 

 

I agree that the doors are 4' and that the building is 16' long based on the planks and also counting the corrugation's, many thanks for that bit of information. Next comes a bit of trigonometry to work out the angle and height of the roof. By placing a rule along the roof line to the main building and then counting bricks it is around 6'9 tall to the eves. It will not be 100 % accurate but it will be near enough. A nice bit of drawing this evening.

 

Thanks again for the interesting discussion, information and help given.

 

Duncan

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20 hours ago, asmay2002 said:

I'll try again with a blow up of the top of one of the doors.  Count the courrugations in the roof.  There 16 of them.  The corrugations in corrugated iron are usually 3 inches wide therefore the single door is 4 foot wide.    Divide by the number of planks and you have the width of a plank.

 

Image2.jpg

The corrugations in the modern world can vary significantly.

 

A customer of mine, a car dealer, had their showrooms completely rebuilt. The owner selected a corrugated metal ceiling for the entire floor, for the builder to use. Then he went on an extended holiday.

When he came back he took one look at the ceiling, that had been fitted, all the lighting fitted to it with holes cut in as required and said it was wrong.

Any way he told them, that isn't what I ordered and went to his office and took out the sample piece, which clearly had a finer pitch, maybe 60mm or so.

He insisted that the builders replaced the lot, which took about 4 weeks to do! The resulting court case relating to payment, took another 3 years to resolve.

 

But in the case of your shed, I don't think anyone is going to worry that much! 3" sounds good.

 

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