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The Chaldrons, By Accurascale


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10 hours ago, Colin_McLeod said:

Question for Accurascale.

 

If I buy two identical packs will there be appropriate fonted transfers available for renumbering one of tbe packs?

 

Could Accurascale bring themselves to put different numbers on either side of each wagon? That looks like an easy route to doubling sales!

 

On the other hand, they may reckon on production selling out anyway without recourse to such measures.

 

For any transfer manufacturer, there's also a market in folk wanting to letter up the Smallbrook Studios chaldrons, in which I imagine there might now be renewed interest.

Edited by Compound2632
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Hi everyone,

 

Also worth remembering that this wont be our only run of Chaldrons, ever. More popular liveries will be re-run with new numbers of course, and other liveries not yet tackled may happen in the future too.

 

Cheers!

 

Fran 

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32 minutes ago, Accurascale Fran said:

and other liveries not yet tackled may happen in the future too.

 

Roman numerals and latin inscriptions perhaps, or the the really early ones with pictures of horses and mammoths on the side.

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24 minutes ago, Michael Hodgson said:

You could probably bodge one into a horse drawn cart

The real waggons were often pulled by ponies, so what we need is a OO working pony to pull them.  If it could be fitted with a NEM socket so much the better!

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23 minutes ago, Bishdurham said:

The real waggons were often pulled by ponies, so what we need is a OO working pony to pull them.  If it could be fitted with a NEM socket so much the better!

Made by viessmann..
 

https://www.eurorailhobbies.com/product.asp?mn=11&ca=29&sc=HO&stock=VM-1591

 

(Its actually a horse, but at 3.5mm it’ll pass as a OO gauge pony).

Edited by adb968008
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4 hours ago, Flying Pig said:

 

Roman numerals and latin inscriptions perhaps, or the the really early ones with pictures of horses and mammoths on the side.

 

I'll order a set of VI for the  SPQR

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6 hours ago, Bishdurham said:

The real waggons were often pulled by ponies, so what we need is a OO working pony to pull them.  If it could be fitted with a NEM socket so much the better!

We have all made a horses ass out of one modelling project or another,would take a bit getting its face expression right..........that said if anyone can crack it AS are the kiddys.

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8 hours ago, Bishdurham said:

The real waggons were often pulled by ponies, so what we need is a OO working pony to pull them.  If it could be fitted with a NEM socket so much the better!

The only wagon missing now is the Dandy cart for the horse to ride down the inclines!

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A week ago I had never heard of the word Chaldron never mind the wagon... 

but I am slowly learning... a couple of questions (excuse if ridiculous.)

 

would these be used to transport from collieries to branchlines as well as ports etc for example private coal merchants .

 

also option of unmarked and numbered ones may sell well. 

 

I am also curious which of the 1890-1920 timeframe would be most popular and likely for a second run. 

 

I picked up a black generics Hornby Lillishall Peckett for no reason and I am hoping I now have one. I think its for around 1900ish and may be alright with these wagons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, ChicagoNick said:

..... would these be used to transport from collieries to branchlines as well as ports etc for example private coal merchants ..... 

Because of the non-standard - or perhaps pre-standard - buffing gear, these could only operate in block trains with suitably equipped locos and brakes. Branchlines, as we know them, were a later invention and other wagons - some not totally dissimilar - were devised for their coal traffic.

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2 hours ago, scots region said:


I like pre-grouping, but I didn’t think the Romans got in on it. 

 

Had railways though as did many ancient civilizations. Which were grooves in the roads that allowed carts and wagons to travel easier. Not that far off the idea of the original plate railways in Britain.

 

Even invented the gauge. A chariot's wheel width is between 4'6" and 5'.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rut_(roads)

 

 

Jason

Edited by Steamport Southport
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1 hour ago, ChicagoNick said:
  • Would these be used to transport from collieries to branch lines as well as ports etc for example private coal merchants .
  • Also option of unmarked and numbered ones may sell well. 
  • I am also curious which of the 1890-1920 timeframe would be most popular and likely for a second run. 
  • I picked up a black generics Hornby Lillishall Peckett for no reason and I am hoping I now have one. I think its for around 1900ish and may be alright with these wagons.

Hi @ChicagoNick

  • In the 19th century, Chaldrons would have moved coal from the colliery to the Staithes on the Tyne, the Tees and the Wear (among others), as well as being formed into block trains by the North Eastern Railway. The NER actively tried to offload its fleet of Chaldrons during the latter part of the century and by 1911, had banned them from the mainline, however there were collieries that had running powers over the main line, like Backworth and Ashington, and they could have been operated in transit as block trains. By this time however, larger hoppers, such as the P7s etc, would have been used for their increased load capacities and so the Chaldrons would have been used internally for moving smaller loads around and clearing out waste.
  • Unmarked wagons do not traditionally sell well, despite the ongoing myth that 'loads of people will buy them' and so we won't be doing that.
  • There are still options for certain colliery's markings, which we have not yet got around to featuring. A second run may address those gaps as well as continuing existing liveries.
  • What you choose to run with your Chaldrons is entirely your business, but the use of small 0-4-0s like the Peckett W4 is entirely in keeping with the spirit of the wagons and the region.
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55 minutes ago, Wickham Green too said:

Now, is that an Old Wiki's tale or just pure coincidence that the gauge is similar - after all there were precious few plateways for over a thousand years after the Romans left Britain .......... or did someone have a very long memory ??!? ;)

 

It has a lot to do with the width of a horse's rump, which I suppose was much the same in ancient Rome as in 18th-century Northumberland. 

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40 minutes ago, Wickham Green too said:

Now, is that an Old Wiki's tale or just pure coincidence that the gauge is similar - after all there were precious few plateways for over a thousand years after the Romans left Britain .......... or did someone have a very long memory ??!? ;)

 

Err. No. Wiki is normally correct.

 

 

I've measured dozens of Roman roads in places in the UK, most unexcavated ones are in Wales. Places like Chester are still built on them. The ruts are about that size. The same as the width of the shafts tethering a carthorse that will be pulling them.

 

Why reinvent the wheel just because an army has left?

 

 

I do have a MA (Hons) in Archaeology so trust me on that. If you don't believe me, buy a ticket to Pompeii and measure them yourself. Or go to Wroxeter.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viroconium_Cornoviorum

 

There are even academic papers published on the subject.

 

 

This is Pompeii.

 

spacer.png

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Sorry, I WOULD call that a reinvention ........ the guys who built the 18th-century Northumberland ( etc.) wagonways would have had absolutely no idea that they were doing exactly the same thing that the Romans did over a thousand years earlier - no, they invented afresh much the same track to fit much the same 'osses backside.

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