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Hornby Locomotive Packaging


Farang
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I have started buying Hornby (China) locomotives and note that the style of packaging has changed over the years.

There appear to be four designs of packaging:

1. The "window" box with a card insert with an illustration of the locomotive. The model is held in a moulded polystyrene tray. The detail parts are in a recess in the front of the tray.

2. As above with the loco held in a split, moulded polystyrene tray. The detail parts in a recess in the top of the upper half of the tray.

3. As above but with a blank card insert and the box within an illustrated sleeve.

4. The current packaging with the loco held in an acetate clamshell pack.

 

Were there any variations on the above?

When were all these changes made?  Knowing that would be a guide as to the age of any model I may see for sale at an event or online. 

 

In addition to the above when were models fitted with the NEM coupler pocket and when did they become DCC Ready?

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Hi Farang,

 

I guess you could also consider train packs/sets, where the loco is held in a larger polystyrene frame with other vehicles, e.g. 3 coaches or a few wagons, maybe a controller and/or track.  Also more drawer-like structures, e.g. the VSOE sets.

 

Coaches and wagons were (still are?) in a card box with a clear acetate window backed by a removable white card sleeve, but a shiny, thin plastic insert which screeches when you slide it out.

 

Some older wagons (perhaps others?) had folded card inserts, stuck inside to the main package body, to support the vehicle, e.g. I have an old R007 (U.D. Milk Tank Wagon) in such packaging.  These were subject to the wagon easily shaking around and sliding along a few millimeters, so not great support but when detail was nowhere near today's standards and small add-on bits today were molded on or not even there at all!

 

As for DCC - the 2006 Hornby Catalogue does mention DCC but not on a loco-level basis, just the controller section.  I suspect it was slightly earlier in time though (2003/4) when the 'Super Detail' Class 50 came out for which I believe all had DCC sockets (8-pin).  Certainly the 50 Years catalogue of 2004 had the 50's (50035 in large logo as one of them) and the Hatton's product database shows it was a 2003 release.

 

As for NEM coupling... no real idea, sorry!

 

Hope that helps :) 

Ixion.

Edited by 97403_Ixion
Added drawer reference for VSOE sets
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Very few accept you can return the model to 'protective custody' without substantial modification of said packaging, if you add the detailing - as I always do to the maximum possible - sometimes the front steps of some steam locomotives cannot be fitted even for 4th radius curves.

 

Al.

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A quick attack of the packaging where neccesssary with a knife is hardly substantial modification IMO but really should be unneccessary and the packaging should be provided to allow for add ons. Think the most dramatic I have done and could be classed possibly as substantial is to the T9 packaging to allow the tender to stay coupled.

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  • 4 weeks later...

The change from foam to plastic block-of-ice occurred around 2014 I think. The different types of foam insert existed side by side and depended on the model - more detailed locos had the two part foam with various fiddly bits.

 

Very broadly speaking, the modern packaging types dates back to the move of production to China in 1998 and fall into two distinct generations:

 

- Generation 1 (1998 - 2014-ish) Locos - foam liner, end label detail included on header card showing through end flap 'window'; rolling stock - vac formed inner, header card with end label detail as above

 

- Generation 2 (used increasingly across the range from around 2014) - clear plastic 'ice-block' used to protect model - placed within double folded tray with end label, inserted in a sleeve (locos); placed in a labelled box (rolling stock).

 

In the last couple of years, egg-box type card has begun to be used for sets and packs as a recycling-friendly alternative to plastic or foam inners.

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18 minutes ago, andyman7 said:

The change from foam to plastic block-of-ice occurred around 2014 I think. The different types of foam insert existed side by side and depended on the model - more detailed locos had the two part foam with various fiddly bits.

 

Very broadly speaking, the modern packaging types dates back to the move of production to China in 1998 and fall into two distinct generations:

 

- Generation 1 (1998 - 2014-ish) Locos - foam liner, end label detail included on header card showing through end flap 'window'; rolling stock - vac formed inner, header card with end label detail as above

 

- Generation 2 (used increasingly across the range from around 2014) - clear plastic 'ice-block' used to protect model - placed within double folded tray with end label, inserted in a sleeve (locos); placed in a labelled box (rolling stock).

 

In the last couple of years, egg-box type card has begun to be used for sets and packs as a recycling-friendly alternative to plastic or foam inners.

I think you'll find the ice block packaging ( Train packs the exception) were in well before 2014. 

I have a B1 from 2010 and a 1960s Duke of Gloucester from 2013 which came packed using the above method.

Edited by Black 5 Bear
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5 hours ago, Black 5 Bear said:

I think you'll find the ice block packaging ( Train packs the exception) were in well before 2014. 

I have a B1 from 2010 and a 1960s Duke of Gloucester from 2013 which came packed using the above method.

I'm sure you're right - I only had the stuff in my collection to go on. But the changeover has been gradual rather than overnight.

Edited by andyman7
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Understood with the polystyrene and the 4-pin.

I still disconnect - carefully - when replacing and keep the separator.

Generally, if no lining remains, I'll use soft tissue to replace it.

I always place the detailing, and again always have to cut away various areas of polystyrene as its moulded to tightly hold the locomotive without the cylinder drains, etc.

I could not fit this detailing, but it would be rude not to fit as much as practically possible - often the front steps cannot be placed, for example.

Al.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Members

 249

Location: Basingstoke, Hants.

Posted 19 hours ago

I was told by a Hornby rep., that over time, the polystyrene interior packaging will deteriorate. Having said that, some of my loco's are now twenty years old, and the packaging is fine.

 

We are told that polystyrene does not deteriorate and eventually the world will collapse under its weight! 

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