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Does anyone out there have an knowledge of  DCLF (Digital Continuous Liquid Forming)? 

 

I just received a crowdfunding solicitation for a resin based 3d printer called Rocket1 which claims pretty remarkable performance such as Z resolution .001mm, XY resolution 0.035mm and 380 mm/hr vertical production using DCLF. It claims to do so via a new resin formulation. It may come from an organization called Hitry. As with many such emails, this is a bit fuzzy.

 

Coming from a school which says if something sounds too good to be true then it probably isn't all that good.

 

Has anyone heard of this process or company enough to comment on them?  

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Wow. That price they're advertising is amazing, especially since they seem to have massively reduced the banding that affects the finish of traditional resin printers (for hobbyists, that's probably more important than the speed), but it all depends on the resin costs.  Reducing the need for particular orientations is useful too.

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16 hours ago, simonmcp said:

There is a TED talk about this type of printer here:- 

 

 

That was the CLIP machine that was all the hype about 5 years ago... but nobody actually bought one and hasn't been heard of since. I had a print done on such a machine and it is still to this day the worst 3D print I've ever received. 

 

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1 hour ago, Quarryscapes said:

 

That was the CLIP machine that was all the hype about 5 years ago... but nobody actually bought one and hasn't been heard of since. I had a print done on such a machine and it is still to this day the worst 3D print I've ever received. 

 

 

Well at £40k-50k per year to lease one it was never going to be a hobbyist favourite. 

 

The Rail's SECR vans were all built on one though...

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If I've understood the promo material for this Rocket printer correctly, it works differently to every other low cost resin printer, in that it cures the top, exposed, layer of resin rather than curing the bottom layer held in place by a tank with a transparent bottom. The up-side of this is that there are no peel forces on the print, hence the better surface finish. The down side it that it will need a whole lot of resin in the tank before it will print. A quick calculation using the build envelope suggest that the tank will need up to 2.5 litres of resin depending on how it calculate where the top of the resin is. 

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