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Are these Exactoscale Hornblocks ?


hayfield
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1 hour ago, brossard said:

I don't know what they are but they look to be pretty complicated.  Better off to go with High Level hornblocks.  They are the best I have come across and I have tried a lot of makes.

 

John

 

If they are complicated then they may well be Exactoscale !!  Thanks for the advise

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John,

 

they were designed for springing. A coil spring sat inside the threaded spring holder which fitted into the hole in the top of the hornguide. The turned steel "tappet" fitted into the spring and bore onto the top of the horn block/bearing.

 

The springs were, IIRC, sold separately in different strengths. The height of the loco could be adjusted by winding the spring holder up or down.

 

I still have some in my bought but never used box. The concept of springing with coil springs never really caught on and the usual Exactoscale approach of the time, whilst theoretically okay wasn;t really practical.

 

Jol

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Exactoscale hornblocks and guides are very easy to use.  I have quite a few P4 locos with them and bought quite a lot for future projects.  However when I changed to 7mm scale I found them very good for springing  bogies.  The little springs aren't quite strong enough for S7 but I add an extra one on the outside of the screw which lets me adjust the pressure so that the wheels are fully sprung, up and down.  Makes for a lovely smooth ride and a joy to watch as wheels ride over bumps but the body just glides! 

 

Ian.

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I've got some of these, in their little grease-proof paper packets, that I bought at a Model Engineering Exhibition at Wembley around 1975. I thought they were actually the original Studiolith products that the Protofour Society helped to sell, but, as I believe they morphed into Exactoscale at some point, I may have got that wrong.  Somewhere I've got some old catalogues, but I'm unlikely to unearth them this side of Easter!

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17 hours ago, Jol Wilkinson said:

John,

 

they were designed for springing. A coil spring sat inside the threaded spring holder which fitted into the hole in the top of the hornguide. The turned steel "tappet" fitted into the spring and bore onto the top of the horn block/bearing.

 

The springs were, IIRC, sold separately in different strengths. The height of the loco could be adjusted by winding the spring holder up or down.

 

I still have some in my bought but never used box. The concept of springing with coil springs never really caught on and the usual Exactoscale approach of the time, whilst theoretically okay wasn;t really practical.

 

Jol

 

Jol

 

That's why I have these then

 

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