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The picture shows the items I queried, plus the fact that the owner has cheekily used the motor spindle as a grindstone/polishing drive. The clamp is for a V block, nothing to do with the lathe as such.

 

The collet set is almost certain to be a Pultra fit type, in 8mm or 10 mm buttress thread, 8mm are more common, and can be bought at model engineering shows. The collet nose looks like the Pultra fit and may be made by them. Lorch collets also fit into Pultra collet chucks..

 

Stephen

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post-6750-127731313612_thumb.jpg

The picture shows the items I queried, plus the fact that the owner has cheekily used the motor spindle as a grindstone/polishing drive. The clamp is for a V block, nothing to do with the lathe as such.

 

The collet set is almost certain to be a Pultra fit type, in 8mm or 10 mm buttress thread, 8mm are more common, and can be bought at model engineering shows. The collet nose looks like the Pultra fit and may be made by them. Lorch collets also fit into Pultra collet chucks..

 

Stephen

 

Hi Stephen,

 

Thank you for answering my questions, and yes that is a face plate but without sounding to thick how does it work, and what can you do with it ? And the chuck is a 3 jaw chuck.

 

ATB, Martyn.

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3 Jaw Chucks are for round work, 4 jaw for square work, and faceplates for awkward odd shape turning or boring holes, and castings, or turning between centres, which methods are all explained more fully on the web or in books.

 

The vital one is the three jaw chuck for day to day use, but you have the luxury of the collets for fine work as well. You could turn out complete wheels sets on the lathe or turn domes etc., all made in the 3 jaw and in brass and steel.

 

Stephen

 

Example of faceplate with body of a chuck being machined on it.post-6750-127731609778.jpg

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3 Jaw Chucks are for round work, 4 jaw for square work, and faceplates for awkward odd shape turning or boring holes, and castings, or turning between centres, which methods are all explained more fully on the web or in books.

 

The vital one is the three jaw chuck for day to day use, but you have the luxury of the collets for fine work as well. You could turn out complete wheels sets on the lathe or turn domes etc., all made in the 3 jaw and in brass and steel.

 

The four jaw independent is also used to hold round material accurately with (as near as you can get to) zero run-out - three jaw chucks are rarely that accurate. It takes a while to learn how to set up material accurately in the four jaw, but once you get the practice it doesn't take too long. One of my first lathes was a Super Adept with only a four jaw independent so I had to learn. :D Some say that if you can only have one chuck with your lathe, it should be a four jaw.

 

Jim.

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One thing I have found out already is that one of the collets is a perfect fit for Slater's axles, which is great for cleaning the rims or putting the paint on precisely ;).

 

ATB, Martyn.

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A lad I know who is a turner by trade says 3-jaw chucks are fit for the bin:rolleyes:

 

He reckons use a 4-jaw for accuracy.

 

 

Go on how do you hold hexagon bar in a four jaw chuck?

 

OzzyO.

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The picture shows the items I queried, plus the fact that the owner has cheekily used the motor spindle as a grindstone/polishing drive. The clamp is for a V block, nothing to do with the lathe as such.

 

The collet set is almost certain to be a Pultra fit type, in 8mm or 10 mm buttress thread, 8mm are more common, and can be bought at model engineering shows. The collet nose looks like the Pultra fit and may be made by them. Lorch collets also fit into Pultra collet chucks..

 

Stephen

 

 

You know Stephen, I have looked very hard but have been unable to find collets at ME show, any suggestions as to suppliers please?

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You know Stephen, I have looked very hard but have been unable to find collets at ME show, any suggestions as to suppliers please?

 

I can only say what I have seen in the past, Chester tools, Sidcup lathes & tools, and lots of s/hand stands. I have bought individual Pultra, Shaublin, Boley and Lorch. As long as the buttress thread matches, most are interchangeable, and range from 6mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm drawbar fit. The size range is about 1/2thou to 8 mm.

 

Occasionally turn up on Ebay as well....eg....http://cgi.ebay.co.u...0#ht_1605wt_930

http://cgi.ebay.co.u...cessories_ET&ha

http://cgi.ebay.co.u...9#ht_1295wt_930

 

Stephen.

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Two jaws grip on two flat faces and the other two on the angled edges. Obvious when you see it done.

 

Geoff.

 

 

Geoff,

 

just for the heck of it please do me a drawing of how this will work.

If it is how I think that you are holding the bar go to the back of the classroom. It is BAD workshop practise use the correct tools for the job.

 

A four jaw chuck is not the correct chuck to hold a six sided object and to get it to run true. Better to do the turning and then to get the flats milled on.

 

OzzyO.

 

Thanks,

 

OzzyO.

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Geoff,

 

just for the heck of it please do me a drawing of how this will work.

If it is how I think that you are holding the bar go to the back of the classroom. It is BAD workshop practise use the correct tools for the job.

 

A four jaw chuck is not the correct chuck to hold a six sided object and to get it to run true. Better to do the turning and then to get the flats milled on.

 

OzzyO.

 

Thanks,

 

OzzyO.

I once had to turn down about a thousand hex headed bolts that had a plain shank that was to big for the holes they were meant to go into. The three jaw chuck just wasn't accurate enough to get them running true, the four jaw was the only way to do the job. The power station hasn't blown up yet so I guess they worked. Sorry I don't know how to post a drawing, must have a think about this.

 

Although I agree with your statement that using the correct tool for the job is important, my story is just one example of how flexible a lathe can be.

Geoff.

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This invention could save a lot of fingers in time. Designed for use on a saw table, not a usual modellers tool, but still interesting. Do not try this at home.

 

http://www.youtube.c...3mzhvMgrLE&NR=1

 

Geoff.

 

 

A good idea but how much would it cost if you were cutting damp wood???

For dry wood fantastic it will save a lot of fingers.

 

 

OzzyO.

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I once had to turn down about a thousand hex headed bolts that had a plain shank that was to big for the holes they were meant to go into. The three jaw chuck just wasn't accurate enough to get them running true, the four jaw was the only way to do the job. The power station hasn't blown up yet so I guess they worked. Sorry I don't know how to post a drawing, must have a think about this.

 

Although I agree with your statement that using the correct tool for the job is important, my story is just one example of how flexible a lathe can be.

Geoff.

 

 

Geoff,

 

just a guess that you did not have a center less grinder or that you were not on a bonus system at that time. you could have used soft dogs this would have given a depth stop and given a better gripping surface. Its now all in the pasted, so does it matter.

 

OzzyO.

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The picture shows how to grip hex or any even number sided object in a four jaw, but this is difficult to set up accurately, requiring test cuts after setting, and a three jaw in any decent condition will hold it just as well, with near automatic concentricity.

post-6750-127733102553.jpg

 

For production a round collect would be used with an internal stop on one face if location is required, or a hex form collet would be used in a CNC centre.

 

To machine a true hex concentric with the core or centre the faces would be machined on after the round section is machined, not gripped by the hex shape.

 

Watchmakers grip hex in a two jaw chuck, with V jaws, it runs true as long as the stock material is accurate.

post-6750-12773313992.jpg

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The picture shows how to grip hex or any even number sided object in a four jaw, but this is difficult to set up accurately, requiring test cuts after setting, and a three jaw in any decent condition will hold it just as well, with near automatic concentricity.

post-6750-127733102553.jpg

 

For production a round collect would be used with an internal stop on one face if location is required, or a hex form collet would be used in a CNC centre.

 

To machine a true hex concentric with the core or centre the faces would be machined on after the round section is machined, not gripped by the hex shape.

 

Watchmakers grip hex in a two jaw chuck, with V jaws, it runs true as long as the stock material is accurate.

post-6750-12773313992.jpg

Thanks for the drawings Bertie, that's the way to do it. Just to clarify, I was working in a corrugated iron hut on a lathe that had been worn out in the main workshops and passed down to the construction site for odd jobs. It was possible to get the bolts running within a thou, which was good enough. For some reason the threaded portion, nominally the same diameter as the shank, entered the holes whereas the shank would not. Under the circumstances I though I'd done rather well.

Geoff.

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It's nice to Drool over all these nice bits of equipment, but does anyone know how to use them rather than just look at the pictures, because I don't and I thought this was what the thread was about sad.gif.

 

Martyn.

 

Hi Martyn,

 

Hard to explain in a short post how to use a lathe! But, there are plenty of books available which will explain things much better than I could. I've recommended this book before on other threads:

 

http://www.sherline.com/bookplug.htm

 

Here's a quote from that page:

 

"Naturally, Sherline tools are featured throughout in the examples, but the rules of machining apply to all types of equipment and sizes of projects. Information is given on selecting materials; using a lathe and a mill; measuring and measurement tools; cutting tools; joining metal (welding and soldering); using accessories for threading, indexing and gear cutting; setting up a home shop; contests and information resources for machinists and much more. Plans and instructions for several simple projects are provided for beginning machinists."

 

I cannot recommend it highly enough, its a fantastic resource, and my lathe is significantly larger than a Sherline (I've got a 10" South Bend with a 4' long bed). For example, my model engineering club ordered 50 at once (so we could get a discount) and they were all gone after 2 meetings. My father was a professional machinst for 40 years, and he refers to his copy occasionally.

 

Mike

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Thanks to all who have contributed to this thread, I have found it very educational and very useful. I see we have some real experts here with a wealth of great information and experience to offer those of us just starting out in the machining world.

 

I have decided this much, I want to get a lathe and I have spent the last few days reading up and looking at what is available. My budget is fairly low, maybe about £500.00 and so far the machine that I keep looking at is the Sieg C3.

 

I would be interested to hear any feedback regarding this machine especially those who have used it.

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Thanks to all who have contributed to this thread, I have found it very educational and very useful. I see we have some real experts here with a wealth of great information and experience to offer those of us just starting out in the machining world.

 

I have decided this much, I want to get a lathe and I have spent the last few days reading up and looking at what is available. My budget is fairly low, maybe about £500.00 and so far the machine that I keep looking at is the Sieg C3.

 

I would be interested to hear any feedback regarding this machine especially those who have used it.

 

 

 

 

 

It dosn`t look like a bad m/c but if you can,buy a quick change tool post to go with it,it saves fiddling about with packing the tools to centre height & makes parting off a doddle providing you set it correctly.

 

I`ve used one on my Myford for years & you just change tools by changing the tool holder.

 

Ray

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Now, first, I do not own a C3, but I have set up several for friends etc., and for the size and price it is un-beatable. It is sold under lots of names, Sieg are the Shanghai engineering group who make them in China.

  • The plus points out way any shortcomings, like needing a bit of adjustment and checking over before use, and being a bit basic and old fashioned in some aspects.
  • It is strong, cast iron, and accurate, and comes with good accessories that work across the range of makes. The motor is DC and stepless controllable, a very nice feature.(full reverse).

The fittings are absolutely standard in every positive way, nothing unusual, or odd ball.

  • It is all serviceable with the lathe able to make it's own spares etc., and specialist suppliers Euro Arc do more sophisticated bearings and gears should you want to fit them later on.

The down side is no proper main saddle lock, no proper lever tailstock lock, and some suppliers have inferior handles.

 

  • These points can be addressed easily, a home made lock can be made in an afternoon, there are articles on the net on how to do it, any home mechanic can do this job.
  • The Tailstock lock is a simple nut, it can be fitted with a simple ring spanner, or Arc Euro and others do cam lock conversions, or you can make your own from the net.
  • The handles vary some are plastic, some chrome metal, all can be changed later one should you find them awkward.
  • The hole where the lead screw enters the head stock needs a felt/cloth washer fitted, a matter of moments to fit, to prevent swarf and oil getting at the electronics .

The Chinese are improving all the time, ensure it is a current supplied one with the best electronics, there were early ones that gave troubles, but all current ones are O.K. and at worse it is replaceable. Chesters version had a US made board which is better, but the standard type is now fully approved and the bugs gone as far as I know.

 

Don't forget that you can have metric or imperial screws as a choice, and you can later add a kit to convert it in minutes from one to the other. The dials are basically metric and do not change, some models have dual, ( but then you should not be using dials to set anything!!).

 

There is a vertical slide as extra for milling, but the machine has the basics with it, and the tapers fitted means anything will fit.

 

Set aside about a day to clean, adjust gib strips, and generally test out the machine and run in the bearings, check over the bed and slide bars for any burrs etc and file these away. Lubricate with car oil, cheap and available!, wipe clean with paraffin and oil mix.

 

If you are a newcomer, do not worry about cooling, the fine cuts you will be making will not overheat, and brass etc needs no lubricant. The picture you see of masses of coolant being used is for production speeds far higher than home use. Also do no worry about the right speed for the material, take it slow and you will not go far wrong, just keep speeds low for steel, and higher for brass.

 

If you do a lot of steel a squeezy bottle of cutting fluid can work wonders for the finish.( or a spot of lard.......)

 

You can buy the interchangeable tool holders, several makes, but do not forget there are plans available free on the net for making your own. There are several specialist enthusiast sites on the 7x10/12 C3 on the net, it is extremely popular in the States, and there are sites for all the areas the lathe can handle.

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Hi Bertiedog,

 

Just a quick line to say thank you for all the info you are providing us with, I am finding it very informative and it is certainly not falling on deaf ears so to speak.

 

ATB, Martyn. :good_mini:

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