Jump to content

great northern

Peterborough North

Recommended Posts

Passenger - Peppercorn A2

 

Goods - Peppercorn K1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

G'day Folks

 

As expected a Peppercorn A1, for passenger, and what about 'Tommy' for freight.

 

manna

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Passenger - Class 85 Electric

Goods - Class 58 Diesel

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, CUTLER2579 said:

LT at Golders Green in 1984

Did you come across a young engineer called Giles Dallaway?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gotta be the AL5 for both freight and passenger.

 

They were intended to be the main locomotives for the electrification of the Doncaster to Kings Cross project with AM9s providing the semi fast services. Sadly funding was withdrawn and the ECML had to wait to be electrocuted.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Clive Mortimore said:

Gotta be the AL5 for both freight and passenger.

 

They were intended to be the main locomotives for the electrification of the Doncaster to Kings Cross project with AM9s providing the semi fast services. Sadly funding was withdrawn and the ECML had to wait to be electrocuted.

No Deltics if that had happened :O

 

Bigger run of 50s perhaps instead, or simply there would have been more than enough other diesels until the wires reached Newcastle and then eventually Edinburgh.

 

That said, the AL5 was a lovely loco and the AM9s would have made for lovely semi fasts.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I'm with Clive on the AL5.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Did you come across a young engineer called Giles Dallaway?

I was based there in a Portakabin and was working on what was to become Train Overhaul. I knew the Foreman and Reps who worked in the Depot but can't recall the name and Giles is quite an unusual name so I would remember.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Did you come across a young engineer called Giles Dallaway?

I remember Giles Dallaway from his time with LU in the late 1980s / early 90s and had some dealings with him regarding Train Audit ratings and also the the RSMIMS ("Rolling Stock Maintenance Integrated Management System" - aka "Who she"?) project documents - for which I was the Specifier and Engineering Acceptance person.

 

Where did you come across him?

 

Regards

Chris H

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Class 85 for passenger, and Class 56 for freight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The class 56 was a Brush design, in fact a 47 with an up rated class 50 engine. Brush did not have the physical capacity to build them, hence Romania and Doncaster, so does it count as a Doncaster design?

Edited by Clive Mortimore
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Metropolitan H said:

I remember Giles Dallaway from his time with LU in the late 1980s / early 90s and had some dealings with him regarding Train Audit ratings and also the the RSMIMS ("Rolling Stock Maintenance Integrated Management System" - aka "Who she"?) project documents - for which I was the Specifier and Engineering Acceptance person.

 

Where did you come across him?

 

Regards

Chris H

PM sent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Clive Mortimore said:

The class 56 was a Brush design, in fact a 47 with an up rated class 50 engine. Brush did not have the physical capacity to build them, hence Romania and Doncaster, so does it count as a Doncaster design?


... And this had me scurrying back through the thread to find if "design" or "build" (or either ... or both) was specified for the Doncaster poll. We've had various options specified previously. This time, it just seems to have been "Doncaster", with no obvious definition.

So I await a ruling.

If the 56 is ruled out, then I suppose that would leave me voting for the 58. A loco which was a very unusual design for the UK, and one not to be repeated. It was half-aimed at the export market, a market on which it attracted precisely zero orders. At home it was notoriously slippery (not a good thing in a freight loco), and was ultimately outlived by the earlier and more numerous Class 56s. Although to be fair, the 56 inspired the creation and purchase of the class 59 by it's own sheer unreliability at one point, so it's not like they didn't have their own faults...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it was my grandfather who advised me that the job you fancy least of all should be the one you do first, so all has stopped while I tackled the duvet. This change is made worse by the fact that both duvet and cover are white, but nevertheless, without too much trauma the thing is confined for another fortnight. The next worst job, mowing my hair, can wait a day or two though.

 

The poll next. I specified designed/built as the qualification a while back, and on that basis the Peppercorn A1 wins the passenger vote by 5 to 4 for Class 85. On the goods vote, Class 56 won with 3.

 

I know we haven't done St Rollox or Horwich, among others, but I sense this poll has run its course, so unless I receive protests or death threats I won't take it further. I'm really not sure what, if anything, to do next either. A coach poll might be a bit niche, and I still can't work out how to do it anyway, and apart from that I'm out of ideas, or nearly so.

 

I'm currently reading again  Freeman Allen's book The Eastern since 1948, and that got me thinking about highlights and the opposite in the history of the ECML. So today I will try to get your views on the single most significant event in the history of the LNER. The day perceptions changed as to what might be possible, if that helps.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gilbert I have a tried and tested method of successfully wrangling a duvet.

 

1) Lay the duvet cover flat on the bed with the opening at the bottom of the bed

2) Open up all the buttons at the bottom

3) Grab the duvet, which will still hopefully be lying on the floor from when you pulled it out for washing and find the two top corners

4) Holding both corners with your left hand, introduce the duvet to the cover and feed it up to the top right hand corner with the right  hand (Seen from above standing at the bottom of the bed)

5) Now hold the fight hand corner with both cover ad duvet corners together as they should be with your right hand

6) Move your left hand, holding onto the left hand corner of the duvet to the top left hand corner of the assemblage.

7) Transfer your left hand to be outside the duvet - you may have to put it on the bed for this

8) spread your arms wide, holding the duvet, give it a shake, and the cover will magically fall down the duvet and envelope it.

9) Give the thing a couple of very good shakes to move all the weight towards the top

10) Repeat (9) if necessary to get the side to side distribution correct

11) Close up the buttons at the bottom

12) Turn down the corner on whichever side you get in /out and place a chocolate on the pillow for later

 

Job Done - Simples!

  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 3
  • Craftsmanship/clever 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess the highlight of the ECML must be Mallard's record run. The lowlight - either the demise of GNER, or the appearance of Virgin. I guess either, but the GNER failure ultimately led to Virgin....so which?

 

Stewart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Most significant to me in terms of proving what was possible was the first non-stop run from King’s Cross to Waverley.

 

The lowlight IMO was the first withdrawal of a Class 91 and HST or the first Azuma entering service (you didn’t specify which LNER we’re discussing :tease:)

Edited by JamieR4489

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, JamieR4489 said:

Most significant to me in terms of proving what was possible was the first non-stop run from King’s Cross to Waverley.

 

The lowlight IMO was the first withdrawal of a Class 91 and HST or the first Azuma entering service (you didn’t specific which LNER we’re discussing :tease:)

There is/was only one LNER. Proper one, anyway.

 

2 hours ago, bigwordsmith said:

Gilbert I have a tried and tested method of successfully wrangling a duvet.

 

1) Lay the duvet cover flat on the bed with the opening at the bottom of the bed

2) Open up all the buttons at the bottom

3) Grab the duvet, which will still hopefully be lying on the floor from when you pulled it out for washing and find the two top corners

4) Holding both corners with your left hand, introduce the duvet to the cover and feed it up to the top right hand corner with the right  hand (Seen from above standing at the bottom of the bed)

5) Now hold the fight hand corner with both cover ad duvet corners together as they should be with your right hand

6) Move your left hand, holding onto the left hand corner of the duvet to the top left hand corner of the assemblage.

7) Transfer your left hand to be outside the duvet - you may have to put it on the bed for this

8) spread your arms wide, holding the duvet, give it a shake, and the cover will magically fall down the duvet and envelope it.

9) Give the thing a couple of very good shakes to move all the weight towards the top

10) Repeat (9) if necessary to get the side to side distribution correct

11) Close up the buttons at the bottom

12) Turn down the corner on whichever side you get in /out and place a chocolate on the pillow for later

 

Job Done - Simples!

But you forgot, write R on right hand, and L on left hand. Seriously, I will try to remember that in a fortnight's time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, JamieR4489 said:

Most significant to me in terms of proving what was possible was the first non-stop run from King’s Cross to Waverley.

 

The lowlight IMO was the first withdrawal of a Class 91 and HST or the first Azuma entering service (you didn’t specific which LNER we’re discussing :tease:)

Ah but beaten a few days before by the LMS with nothing more than a MR (Derby designed) Compound 4-4-0.

 

Most significant day for the LNER and ECML was 31st December 1947.

 

I am not sure what the lowlight would be, I suppose Raven not being able to electrify the ECML (part of) or that the London suburban services were not electrified despite the Quad-arts being designed so that they could be converted to EMUs.

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.