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62774 The Staintondale

 

Nice sounding name and I 'discovered' the station of the same name when me and my bike once negotiated the trackbed of the legendary Scarborough-Whitby coastal railway.

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Not as an entrant for voting, more an aside.

Always vehemently denied by others as not possible, but I saw 62729 Rutlandshire, and 62744 The Holderness, on the St. Ives loop out of Cambridge, c1959/60. I remember seeing the nameplates, then underling them in my ABC & wondering why they were not the local names of Cambridgeshire or Huntingdonshire!

To add to the mystery, in later years I met another Cambridge spotter, who became my best friend (though sadly now deceased). One day these cops came up in conversation; he had seen them at Cambridge as well.....

Anyone else able to shed any light?

 

Stewart

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Is it acceptable to follow a Hunt class locomotive if the centre big end heat detector is filled with aniseed rather than oil of violets?

Then at least any hounds in the following train can have a drag race!

 

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I suspect many are uncomfortable with this naming theme.  Personally, I understand that certain animals are pests and have to be controlled, but I would prefer that to be by the most humane means possible.  On Saturday I had to remove a dead mouse from a trap and felt full of remorse, though for some time it had at night been scratching in the loft immediately above our bed.

 

Irrespective of any such qualms, the naming of these locomotives is a historical fact and the use of similar names for warships also goes back many years.  My choice of favourite name is The Pytchley, 62750, after my Trix Twin 4-4-0 of that name. With pocket money of 6d per week, it took many weeks of saving plus birthday and Christmas money to amass the necessary £5-17-6d.  

 

 Aged maybe 8 or 9, I knew that BR had added 60,000 to LNER numbers and somehow dreamed it was the loco featured in 2750 Legend of a Locomotive, which I had borrowed from the library.

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  • RMweb Gold

 

My choice is 62736 The Bramham Moor, just because it was the Hornby loco in the Meccano Magazines that I read and reread as a young boy.

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G'Day Folks

 

Living in North Lundun, I never got to see the 'Exotic' loco's from the North, but I'll go for (I think) The Goathland.

 

manna

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 'Westmorland', has to be because that's from where my mother's family traces its roots, which include a grandfather reputedly a director of the GNR but more likely a shareholder... my Aunts were prone to exaggeration.  I thought it was Westmoreland though...

Edited by robmcg
correction
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I'll go for Evan Ddu in this one. Ddu (pronounced 'do') is gaelic for 'black', which sounds very suitable for a steam engine. It reminds me of a house name that I like in the Black Isle. The sign has a black painted thistle on it, and the name - Thistle Ddu!

 

Going back to the spelling of Westmoreland, at least that is only one letter out. As Morayshire, Argyllshire, Rutlandshire, etc are so burdened, why is it not Cumberlandshire, Westmorelandshire, etc. At least it would be a consistent error.

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59 minutes ago, FarrMan said:

Going back to the spelling of Westmoreland, at least that is only one letter out. As Morayshire, Argyllshire, Rutlandshire, etc are so burdened, why is it not Cumberlandshire, Westmorelandshire, etc. At least it would be a consistent error.

Hi,

at it's most basic, shire comes from the Anglo-Saxon for county, so county of Lincoln, county of York etc, the word county being introduced by the Normans, so all counties were also shires, it's just that some never use the term shire.

 

A modern day example is that although Argyll is sometimes called Argyllshire, I've never heard it called that, and in the local newspaper it's just referred to as Argyll.  However, in some copies of books I've got originally printed in the late 19th century some of them refer to Argyllshire.

 

Roja

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27 minutes ago, 37Oban said:

Hi,

at it's most basic, shire comes from the Anglo-Saxon for county, so county of Lincoln, county of York etc, the word county being introduced by the Normans, so all counties were also shires, it's just that some never use the term shire.

 

A modern day example is that although Argyll is sometimes called Argyllshire, I've never heard it called that, and in the local newspaper it's just referred to as Argyll.  However, in some copies of books I've got originally printed in the late 19th century some of them refer to Argyllshire.

 

Roja

Agreed. Sometimes the 'shire' versions are used, but it as wrong as calling Edinburgh 'Edinborough', or calling the Scottish Goods the 'Scotch Goods' for that matter, even though in this case the latter is ubiquitous.

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