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great northern
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Despite hankering after a J14/J54 saddletank, I would have to agree with the above and vote for the 4-2-2.
Only,however, with a driver familiar with the techniques of driving one.
Have just read in HAV Bulleid's 'Master Builders of Steam' that the TE of the first Ivatt Atlantic was the same as the Single, but of course with much more adhesion.
I must check this, because Mr Bulleid (jnr), appears to lack accuracy elsewhere.

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I were getting worried, I were. When I closed down last night there had only been three votes cast. For a famous GNR man! You must all have been very busy yesterday, as quite a few more came in overnight and this morning.

 

In the end, 7 votes for the Single, a very comfortable winner. Some of these polls are bound to be more predictable than others, where there has been a really standout design, and I reckon this was always going to be one of them.

 

Today, George Hughes of the L&Y, and briefly of the LMS.

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Heart says Baltic tanks.
Head says Crab 2-6-0s. Basic, hard working and certainly on the L&Y lines round Manchester, a true mixed traffic engine. 
I was hauled by a Crab as a boy on the Calder Valley line.

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I have a soft spot for the 4-cyl 4-6-0s ... but difficult to put hand on heart and say 'successful'?

 

I'm going to go for the 0-8-0 heavy hauler freight loco. A 'plodder' but well-suited to the job it was required to do in the northern coalfields. Some survived into BR days. The Fowler LMS version of the type was not an outstanding success by comparison. Picture shows my Hughes 0-8-0 in the company of the Fowler type.

 

(I initially mis-read the question and thought we were only considering L&Y types. Ah well, I'll stick with it - it'll make a change from all the Crab votes!)

 

IMG_5584_LR.jpg

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I’m going with the Crab, with it’s most unique appearance with those large inclined cylinders, etc.,  I have two of the lovely Bachmann models of them, which I enjoy running on the layout.

 

 Rob.

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Baltic tank.

 

Just over a week ago one was being auctioned on Vectis Auctions and I missed having a bid, mind you it went for far more than I could afford. It looked lovely in full Midland Crimson livery but with an LMS badge.

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As the Baltic tank was only limited to 20 locos and all scrapped by end 1942, it will have to be the "Crab" 2-6-0 which with 245 built just got on with their hard work for a good long life - with few problems.

 

Regards

Chris H

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3 hours ago, jollysmart said:

I'll go for the 0-8-0, can't beat a good heavy freight loco that can do the job.

Problem with the large boilered 0-8-0s, the axleboxes were fragile.
The origional Aspinal small boilered locos were fine. The large boilered locos could do the job but, like the 'Austin Sevens', were flawed.

 

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On 04/04/2021 at 00:17, great northern said:

Right, now to an attempt to recreate a prototype photo, and a special one too, having been taken by Tim's Dad on 23rd May 1958.

 

 

317606410_61619Peterborough23-5-58_127-101L1200.jpg.2a5a210edf25ee8645670ee2344299d9.jpg

This shows Welbeck Abbey pulling out of the Up carriage sidings. The train, I am sure is the 4.32 to Harwich, as I've seen several shots of March engines doing the same thing, and the stock matches the official formation, almost. Tim's Dad was a teenager at the time, so there is no way he would have had a permit to stray off the platforms, which means this must have been taken from the North end of Platform 3/4, where spotters tended to congregate, or perhaps be sent by the staff. I thought at first that the structure with the sloping top just in view on the left was the telephone box attached to the water crane at the end of the platform, and looking at other photos I can't see any thing else further north which would fit the bill. However, the carriage sidings were a fair way along from that, whereas the loco looks very close. So, I'm puzzled as to how this was taken, and I couldn't achieve anything remotely like it with the camera on the platform, even when using telephoto, which I presume Tim's Dad didn't have in 1958. So, here is the nearest I could get.

 

 

1419094089_1619comp.JPG.6a24195895838de74d0b7a4a75b3ba5f.JPG

I forgot the BG was maroon. To get this to look anything like, the camera had to be positioned quite a way further north of the platform, and even then I couldn't get the same angle. I suppose with the compression of distance which was necessary at this end of the layout, that isn't really surprising. My camera would also be sitting considerably higher, of course,

 

Tim is much more clever than me, so perhaps we will see what he can do when he is next allowed to visit.

 

I'd love to have  go at grafting my B17 photo onto this superb shot, and colouring it as well, if it were to permitted.

 

It reminds me of my own experiences of 1958 when the sun always shone, and the photo is redolent of those days of spotting , too.   Lovely.

 

My picture removed.  Sorry Gilbert and especially Tim. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by robmcg
addition removal
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19 hours ago, great northern said:

Right, now to an attempt to recreate a prototype photo, and a special one too, having been taken by Tim's Dad on 23rd May 1958.

 

 

317606410_61619Peterborough23-5-58_127-101L1200.jpg.2a5a210edf25ee8645670ee2344299d9.jpg

This shows Welbeck Abbey pulling out of the Up carriage sidings. The train, I am sure is the 4.32 to Harwich, as I've seen several shots of March engines doing the same thing, and the stock matches the official formation, almost. Tim's Dad was a teenager at the time, so there is no way he would have had a permit to stray off the platforms, which means this must have been taken from the North end of Platform 3/4, where spotters tended to congregate, or perhaps be sent by the staff. I thought at first that the structure with the sloping top just in view on the left was the telephone box attached to the water crane at the end of the platform, and looking at other photos I can't see any thing else further north which would fit the bill. However, the carriage sidings were a fair way along from that, whereas the loco looks very close. So, I'm puzzled as to how this was taken, and I couldn't achieve anything remotely like it with the camera on the platform, even when using telephoto, which I presume Tim's Dad didn't have in 1958. So, here is the nearest I could get.

 

 

1419094089_1619comp.JPG.6a24195895838de74d0b7a4a75b3ba5f.JPG

I forgot the BG was maroon. To get this to look anything like, the camera had to be positioned quite a way further north of the platform, and even then I couldn't get the same angle. I suppose with the compression of distance which was necessary at this end of the layout, that isn't really surprising. My camera would also be sitting considerably higher, of course,

 

Tim is much more clever than me, so perhaps we will see what he can do when he is next allowed to visit.

They both look identical to me Gilbert.

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