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Hello again drmditch

 

Just to add a little to the 'smorgasbord' posting above...

 

Page 28 of Don Rowland's book shows a photo of a Diag.1/034 wagon. The caption contains the following:

On the nearside buffer at the right-hand end can be seen one of the 2.1/2" collars which were welded to the buffer shanks to give the 1ft 8.1/2" necessary with screw couplings on such conversions. Many previously unfitted wagons were dealt with in this way. 

 

Nothing's easy with railways, is it? :)

 

However, this is part of the 'unwritten purpose' of these Mini-Polls in that we hope the debates and comments will increase our overall understanding.

 

Brian

 

 

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Well I have to admit that I’m in the if it’s got five planks, it’s an open wagon camp and I struggle to tell the difference between all the variants. So, I’m unlikely to buy many of these, especially as kits are easy to build and probably better value. However, I would go for an LNER 6 plank and an LMS 5 plank, both 9’ and 10’ and perhaps an SR 8 plank for variety. The Ex SNCF wagons are lovely, but I’ve already built too many Parkside kits of them. I’m not really interested in palvans (as I have two or three kit built versions) or hopper wagons (as I don’t believe they worked at the south end of the GNML - happy to be corrected on this).
 

I’m even tighter when it comes to open wagons than with vans, so I’m unlikely to pay more than £10 for any of these.

 

So, 2,3,6,8,10 for me. With 2 and 10 being my top choices.

 

Andy
 

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1 hour ago, BMacdermott said:

Hello again drmditch

 

Just to add a little to the 'smorgasbord' posting above...

 

Page 28 of Don Rowland's book shows a photo of a Diag.1/034 wagon. The caption contains the following:

On the nearside buffer at the right-hand end can be seen one of the 2.1/2" collars which were welded to the buffer shanks to give the 1ft 8.1/2" necessary with screw couplings on such conversions. Many previously unfitted wagons were dealt with in this way. 

 

Nothing's easy with railways, is it? :)

 

However, this is part of the 'unwritten purpose' of these Mini-Polls in that we hope the debates and comments will increase our overall understanding.

 

Brian

 

 

Brian,

 

If you want a real fright, check out Page 40 of Don Rowland's "Twilight of the Goods"

 

SR 10' wb 5-plank, built unfitted in 1943, with (presumably second-hand) split-spoke wheels that have survived the addition of vacuum braking by BR in the 1950s, and with BR Oleo buffers which might, or might not, have been fitted at the same time.

 

Split-spoke wheels and Oleo buffers on the same wagon? Surely not.:devil:

 

The paint on it looks pretty new, so were all the changes concurrent and recent or was the AVB added earlier, with the buffers replacing older (extended) ones at a further overhaul/repaint not long prior to the taking of the photo in 1960?

 

Fascinating, and (for me) completely addictive.

 

John

Edited by Dunsignalling
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1 hour ago, Dunsignalling said:

Brian,

 

If you want a real fright, check out Page 40 of Don Rowland's "Twilight of the Goods"

 

SR 10' wb 5-plank, built unfitted in 1943, with (presumably second-hand) split-spoke wheels that have survived the addition of vacuum braking by BR in the 1950s, and with BR Oleo buffers which might, or might not, have been fitted at the same time.

 

Split-spoke wheels and Oleo buffers on the same wagon? Surely not.:devil:

 

The paint on it looks pretty new, so were all the changes concurrent and recent or was the AVB added earlier, with the buffers replacing older (extended) ones at a further overhaul/repaint not long prior to the taking of the photo in 1960?

 

Fascinating, and (for me) completely addictive.

 

John

A great excuse to use LMS Buffers......:D and I don't mean Long Meandering Slowly either but those of Mr Franks.

P

Edited by Mallard60022
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14 hours ago, FarrMan said:

Same as before for this poll. 1, 2 and 3. Multiples, especially of 1.

 

Lloyd

Thanks Lloyd.

 

Did you still wish to have Item 1 as your 'focused choice'?

 

Brian

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11 hours ago, manna said:

G'Day Folks

 

1,2 & 10, most are to late for me.

 

manna

Hello manna

 

Did you wish to have the additional 'focused choices'? There is no obligation, but thought I'd better mention it.

 

Brian

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15 hours ago, Dunsignalling said:

Brian,

 

If you want a real fright, check out Page 40 of Don Rowland's "Twilight of the Goods"

 

SR 10' wb 5-plank, built unfitted in 1943, with (presumably second-hand) split-spoke wheels that have survived the addition of vacuum braking by BR in the 1950s, and with BR Oleo buffers which might, or might not, have been fitted at the same time.

 

Split-spoke wheels and Oleo buffers on the same wagon? Surely not.:devil:

 

The paint on it looks pretty new, so were all the changes concurrent and recent or was the AVB added earlier, with the buffers replacing older (extended) ones at a further overhaul/repaint not long prior to the taking of the photo in 1960?

 

Fascinating, and (for me) completely addictive.

 

John

 

Thanks John

 

Indeed, I do have that book!

 

I guess I'm just like you...we have a question, we research the question, we get an answer, but that answer produces two more questions!! The subject is simply exponential in nature!

 

I well remember once when running the 'old main Poll' that someone wrote to us in an extremely irate manner castigating The Team for not listing Wagon A with Buffers B, Wheels C, in Livery D, as running in years E-F.

 

Our Mini-Polls are simply for fun (and 'education'). The mantra still applies: If it looks like a Cattle Wagon, it probably is a Cattle Wagon.

 

Brian:rolleyes:

 

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1 minute ago, BMacdermott said:

 

Thanks John

 

Indeed, I do have that book!

 

I guess I'm just like you...we have a question, we research the question, we get an answer, but that answer produces two more questions!! The subject is simply exponential in nature!

 

I well remember once when running the 'old main Poll' that someone wrote to us in an extremely irate manner castigating The Team for not listing Wagon A with Buffers B, Wheels C, in Livery D, as running in years E-F.

 

Our Mini-Polls are simply for fun (and 'education'). The mantra still applies: If it looks like a Cattle Wagon, it probably is a Cattle Wagon.

 

Brian:rolleyes:

 

Unless its an Ale or Broccoli wagon.....

 

John:angel: 

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1 hour ago, great northern said:

My appalling ignorance where wagons are concerned comes into sharp focus now, so I am still thinking about this part of the poll. While I do that, here is the formation of the train behind Champion Lodge, which is shown as having been on a two day cycle, mainly round Peterborough on the first day, but venturing as far as Bury St Edmunds on the second.

 

 

970922359_8rake1.JPG.6e132fb0120148e7f00f462660f7c9c3.JPG1306310485_9rake2.JPG.ea3214b09ffa54f3c54f8165388adf9f.JPG482293928_10rake3.JPG.386f3ebf271490077445eeb9310f6b0a.JPG2105518057_11rake4.JPG.ec99c2f4aa8589ac53f9b668d8429e9c.JPG500922634_12rake5.JPG.a23c0938c7c94eea03448d46d0227b9e.JPG

All very logical until one comes to the non corridor car tacked on the end. Understandable in an ad hoc formation, but this is from the Carriage Working book.

 

 

 

Nice coaches - as you know I always like to see what’s behind the engine. It looks odd not having a brake at the back.

 

Andy

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Well, as the trouble-maker partly responsible for this additional poll, I'd better cast my votes:

 

9ft wheelbase Opens

2 LMS 9ft wb 5-plank Open Wagon (Diag.1666 of 1923)

 

10ft wheelbase Opens

6 LMS 10ft wb 5-plank Open Wagon (Diags.1892 & 2110 of 1934 & 1946)

9 BR 10ft wb 5-plank Open Wagon (GWR Diag.O31, from 1932 with 21 various BR diagrams)

10 LNER 10ft wb 6-plank Open Wagon (from c.1932)

 

I've only voted for one of the 9ft types anyway; if I was to choose just one of the 10fts then it would be No.10.

 

In terms of comments, I think I made them already. Only thing to add is that both books I've looked at (Rowland BR wagons and Essery/Morgan LMS wagon) refer to the generic type as 'open merchandise wagons' which I think is a good description and makes it clear that these wagons were not designed to carry minerals (RTR manufacturers please note!)

 

Graham

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1to 12 inclusive.
2&6. I model BR LMS central division.
The modern wagons, I would have a Prestwin block train, same with the hoppers. Multiple Palvans. I have two K's Palvans built and running.

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13 hours ago, LNER4479 said:

Well, as the trouble-maker partly responsible for this additional poll, I'd better cast my votes:

 

9ft wheelbase Opens

2 LMS 9ft wb 5-plank Open Wagon (Diag.1666 of 1923)

 

10ft wheelbase Opens

6 LMS 10ft wb 5-plank Open Wagon (Diags.1892 & 2110 of 1934 & 1946)

9 BR 10ft wb 5-plank Open Wagon (GWR Diag.O31, from 1932 with 21 various BR diagrams)

10 LNER 10ft wb 6-plank Open Wagon (from c.1932)

 

I've only voted for one of the 9ft types anyway; if I was to choose just one of the 10fts then it would be No.10.

 

In terms of comments, I think I made them already. Only thing to add is that both books I've looked at (Rowland BR wagons and Essery/Morgan LMS wagon) refer to the generic type as 'open merchandise wagons' which I think is a good description and makes it clear that these wagons were not designed to carry minerals (RTR manufacturers please note!)

 

Graham

Exactly Graham, if you watch (as you do and we do no doubt) those good old films of yesteryear then there are the Merchandise Wagons loaded with all sorts; sacks, bundles of stuff, crates, machines, barrels, wood, unidentifiables and, of course secret items covered in Sheets. IIRC, Control in the old days was VERY particular about what wagons carried what and ordered stuff on demand so local Yard gaffers had to be on the ball all the time.

P

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