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C1

 

"And every year, on the eve of the accident, she rides again, hurtling through the station, whistle screaming, safety valves lifting, her driver and fireman clinging grimly to her swaying footplate, doomed passengers oblivious to their impending fate..."

 

(Ghost train, in other words.)

 

Which gives me an idea for your frequent lighting woes - why not get some good quality illumination and take some photos at night under artificial light? (Or just calculate how much it would cost to do so, then spend the money on a C1 instead, and count it as a saving.)

 

All the best,

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A good selection of the V2 on the Class C goods Gilbert.

 

The first and last photos are my favourites, especially the first one, which gives the viewers a sense of anticipation as though they were standing at the platform end waiting to check the loco number.

 

Great stuff!

 

Eric

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A good selection of the V2 on the Class C goods Gilbert.

 

The first and last photos are my favourites, especially the first one, which gives the viewers a sense of anticipation as though they were standing at the platform end waiting to check the loco number.

 

Great stuff!

 

Eric

One thing for sure Eric. If you were standing watching a V2 coming under that bridge, you would have known for sure that it wasn't going to be Coldstreamer!  Mind you, I don't suppose you saw much of Green Arrow up your way either. You got more of the NE ones though.

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C1

 

"And every year, on the eve of the accident, she rides again, hurtling through the station, whistle screaming, safety valves lifting, her driver and fireman clinging grimly to her swaying footplate, doomed passengers oblivious to their impending fate..."

 

(Ghost train, in other words.)

 

Which gives me an idea for your frequent lighting woes - why not get some good quality illumination and take some photos at night under artificial light? (Or just calculate how much it would cost to do so, then spend the money on a C1 instead, and count it as a saving.)

 

All the best,

I've checked out the lighting Alan, and discussed it with Andy Y. It would be fairly expensive, and would also mean that I'd have to try and take my limited expertise somewhat further, which I really don't want to do, as I suspect there would be a lot more to learn, stacking and that sort of stuff. Looks like the C1 doesn't it? Or of course, I might stiffen my resolve, and not buy anything.

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Hi Gilbert

 

Just catching up after a week away in China.  Your recent pics are superb and seeing 60854 on the Class C and makes me hope that Bachmann extract the proverbial digit and get to producing the rebodied rechassied one very soon.  As for your angst of a C1, I too have been having the same problem, and I think I probably have a more legitimate excuse than Sir Augustus does, but that would mean not going beyond 1950 and I'm not sure if I want to restrict myself to only the first two years of nationalisation.  They do look fantastic though and by all accounts run just as well.  I do like you giving us all of your photos and I don't have any problem about them being "in the raw" rather than shopped, though the latter are very good too. 

 

I'm not sure if you are still taking requests, but I think it has been some time between coal trains perhaps?  What is interesting from a recent acquisition of a 1948 WTT is the ratio of goods to passenger services on the ECML to Leeds, it seems about 3:1.  It made me realise that I might need a few more wagons and was wondering if the same might have been the case through PN? 

 

Good to also see the mighty Duck working hard on that telegraph pole, will be quite a focal point in shots of the station forecourt.  Did you tell him that it has to all be carefully threaded too, on each of those itty bitty insulators (or were you keeping that from him to save his sanity!)

 

Cheers

Tony

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Excuse the resonse from me Gilbert.

Tony, much appreciated comments from the Duck here. Good old blobby soldering I can assure you!

Coal trains following a visit to China eh? Did you really go steam chasing?

The 'Beast' pole looks really crude close up and the pots are 'inverted'. This is intentional as I/we were trying to replicate the complete jumble that was the top of this pole. If it and the others for the Station forecourt and Cattle Dock areas do not 'look the part' when placed, then I shall be trying out some constructions using Express Models turned brass pots (superb little items). However that will be a really different and far more 'technical' set of builds. 

I think that it may only have to be the 'Beast' that gets redone though having studied our prototype pics once again.

Quackers.

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Hi Gilbert

 

Just catching up after a week away in China.  Your recent pics are superb and seeing 60854 on the Class C and makes me hope that Bachmann extract the proverbial digit and get to producing the rebodied rechassied one very soon.  As for your angst of a C1, I too have been having the same problem, and I think I probably have a more legitimate excuse than Sir Augustus does, but that would mean not going beyond 1950 and I'm not sure if I want to restrict myself to only the first two years of nationalisation.  They do look fantastic though and by all accounts run just as well.  I do like you giving us all of your photos and I don't have any problem about them being "in the raw" rather than shopped, though the latter are very good too. 

 

I'm not sure if you are still taking requests, but I think it has been some time between coal trains perhaps?  What is interesting from a recent acquisition of a 1948 WTT is the ratio of goods to passenger services on the ECML to Leeds, it seems about 3:1.  It made me realise that I might need a few more wagons and was wondering if the same might have been the case through PN? 

 

Good to also see the mighty Duck working hard on that telegraph pole, will be quite a focal point in shots of the station forecourt.  Did you tell him that it has to all be carefully threaded too, on each of those itty bitty insulators (or were you keeping that from him to save his sanity!)

 

Cheers

Tony

 As to the C1, I reckon you should be OK Tony, as your period is a lot closer to last withdrawal than mine. Also, you already have a very transitional period anyway, what with Pacifics in apple green, BR blue and BR green, and coaching stock in teak and crimson and cream, so I reckon a C1 will fit in without striking a jarring note, as it would on PN, or it does for me anyway.

 

As to coal trains, there was of course a lot more passenger traffic towards the South end of the ECML than on the Leeds extension. I do have an article which gives the full details of Up departures of goods trains from New England in 1960, and which shows 22 Up coal trains every day. Only seven of them though ran between 0730 and 1800, as there just weren't paths available for them.  The article doesn't give as much detail for arriving trains from London, but I make it 23 in all, and again mostly running overnight into early morning, or later in the evening. That is confirmed by my 1956 WTT. Those that did run tended to be in clumps - for example 2.08pm 2.16 pm and 2.24pm departures to London, where the operators obviously took advantage of a slack period on the Up to get as many as possible on their way.

 

Having checked, the next train on the Up line is coal for Ferme Park, so when I get time to do some running I'll try to remember to point the camera at that one.

 

I like that duck. He is a very nice drake indeed, and I will not deliberately ruffle his feathers, so we shall not even consider stringing wires between the poles. It would be asking for trouble if I did, I'd be bound to catch them while reaching over. Anyway, you can't see them at all on most of the photographs.

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Procrastination. Is this a good thing? Well, if it stops me attempting to do anything I haven't tried before, the answer is emphatically no. It is over three weeks since our generous duck flew in bearing lovely coaches that he has built for me. He suggested that I might have a go at some bits myself, in particular lining, so I ordered some transfers. They arrived a couple of weeks ago, and I did.........nothing. Finally, yesterday I managed to kick myself into action, and actually did something. I keep looking at it, and asking myself if it is worth keeping, or should I try to get it off, and either start again, or leave it to someone who can do it properly. Then it occurred to me that the best way to expose in the most cruel way any deficiencies would be to point a camera at it, so I did. The coach is by no means the finished article, so this is only to illustrate my lack of lining skills. I know we all have to start somewhere, and that we improve by constant practice, but seriously, is this worth perseverance on my part?

post-98-0-22987600-1433584201_thumb.jpg

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Looks great to me, carry on!

Dave.

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Procrastination. Is this a good thing? Well, if it stops me attempting to do anything I haven't tried before, the answer is emphatically no. It is over three weeks since our generous duck flew in bearing lovely coaches that he has built for me. He suggested that I might have a go at some bits myself, in particular lining, so I ordered some transfers. They arrived a couple of weeks ago, and I did.........nothing. Finally, yesterday I managed to kick myself into action, and actually did something. I keep looking at it, and asking myself if it is worth keeping, or should I try to get it off, and either start again, or leave it to someone who can do it properly. Then it occurred to me that the best way to expose in the most cruel way any deficiencies would be to point a camera at it, so I did. The coach is by no means the finished article, so this is only to illustrate my lack of lining skills. I know we all have to start somewhere, and that we improve by constant practice, but seriously, is this worth perseverance on my part?

attachicon.giflining.jpg

 

Lining on gresley paneled coaches in very difficult. You've not said whose  transfers you've used.

 

Each type has it's own nak.  I tend to stretch pressfix before placing them but not ideal for panelled coaches. Fox are best applied with lots of water and a steel rule.

 

Though what you've done isn't bad. The two foot rule always helps. At the end of the day it's up to you.  Cheers

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Gilbert,

I think they are very satisfactory. I am going to have a go at a Bachmann O gauge MK1 soon and if it comes out as good as your Gresley,I will be very pleased.Well Done.

Regards,Derek.

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Lining on gresley paneled coaches in very difficult. You've not said whose  transfers you've used.

 

Each type has it's own nak.  I tend to stretch pressfix before placing them but not ideal for panelled coaches. Fox are best applied with lots of water and a steel rule.

 

Though what you've done isn't bad. The two foot rule always helps. At the end of the day it's up to you.  Cheers

I used Modelmaster this time, David, as that is what we used when TW gave me my tutorial last year. I've noticed that even he cheated a bit when it came to dealing with grab handles, and I did wonder why he put all the door handles exactly parallel to the beading. Now I know. I've had a go at the other side, and I think it is slightly better, so hopefully I can continue to improve. I'm not helped though by the fact that just at the distance where I need to see close up, I can't get in focus, either with glasses on or without. At least I'm getting on with something though.

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Gilbert,

I think they are very satisfactory. I am going to have a go at a Bachmann O gauge MK1 soon and if it comes out as good as your Gresley,I will be very pleased.Well Done.

Regards,Derek.

Thanks Derek, that is reassuring. I've got a Triplet set to tackle next though, but at least there are a lot less doors to contend with.

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My resolution to get on with things has worked pretty well today, so as well as lining the other side of that coach, I've also weathered the underframe of that one and some others. And while the paint was drying, and the lining hardening, I ran a few trains too, and took some photos. How's that for multi tasking?

post-98-0-64440100-1433613861_thumb.jpg

A Cravens DMU arrives from bracing Skegness, with a load of shivering day trippers. More tomorrow, as I now have to deal with my other resolution - at least twenty minutes fast walking on any day when I don't play golf. Speaking of which, Tiger Woods shot 85 today. :rofl:

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G'day Gents

 

I shot 75 today............bl**dy pigeons!

 

manna

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It goes without saying that lining a BR maroon Gresley can be the very devil. The task is made no easier when etches differ so much even from the same producer. But you have made a good job of putting on the transfer lining. If you want "easy", paint your coaches blood & custard....The lining was lower away from the pesky horizontal beading.

Edited by coachmann

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Procrastination. Is this a good thing? Well, if it stops me attempting to do anything I haven't tried before, the answer is emphatically no. It is over three weeks since our generous duck flew in bearing lovely coaches that he has built for me. He suggested that I might have a go at some bits myself, in particular lining, so I ordered some transfers. They arrived a couple of weeks ago, and I did.........nothing. Finally, yesterday I managed to kick myself into action, and actually did something. I keep looking at it, and asking myself if it is worth keeping, or should I try to get it off, and either start again, or leave it to someone who can do it properly. Then it occurred to me that the best way to expose in the most cruel way any deficiencies would be to point a camera at it, so I did. The coach is by no means the finished article, so this is only to illustrate my lack of lining skills. I know we all have to start somewhere, and that we improve by constant practice, but seriously, is this worth perseverance on my part?

attachicon.giflining.jpg

Hi Gilbert

 

I think the lining is absolutely fine and I didn't really spot any slight unevenness around the door handle until I zoomed in.  I don't think any visitor would notice any slight undulation unless you took the coach off the layout and asked for a very close inspection.

 

I too have had some real challenges with coach lining, but got better with practice.  I use Pressfix and Fox Transfers usually chopped into 3 cm lengths and a steel rule.  However, compared with the Gresley stock you're lining, I have the much easier option as I'm lining Stanier coaches.  Even with this, I've still had instances where I've put lining on, looked at it in the morning, removed it and tried again (fortunately I do this less now!).

 

The picture below shows the slight hash I made with the lining above the windows on a Comet Stanier Porthole coach.  To me it looks like a slack washing line, but I decided to keep it and no visitors have yet noticed.

 

post-7537-0-16192400-1433659071_thumb.jpg

 

Best Regards

Edmund

Edited by Edmund Kinder
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It goes without saying that lining a BR maroon Gresley can be the very devil. The task is made no easier when etches differ so much even from the same producer. But you have made a good job of putting on the transfer lining. If you want "easy", paint your coaches blood & custard....The lining was lower away from the pesky horizontal beading.

Thanks Larry. If the master craftsman says I made a good job of it, what more could I possibly ask?  I shall now continue with the Triplet set with renewed confidence, and of course try to do a bit better.

 

 Bit of a catch 22 with the blood and custard though, isn't there?  Well, for people like me there is. The simpler nature of the lining is offset by the masking needed during the painting process, and the difficulty of getting colours that look realistic. I find that most cream on offer is indeed like custard - too yellow - and the crimson is too dark as well. Shame really, as I prefer it to maroon.

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Bit of a catch 22 with the blood and custard though, isn't there?  Well, for people like me there is. The simpler nature of the lining is offset by the masking needed during the painting process, and the difficulty of getting colours that look realistic. I find that most cream on offer is indeed like custard - too yellow - and the crimson is too dark as well. Shame really, as I prefer it to maroon.

Factory weathered locos often look 'not right' on a shelf and yet they look fine in the environs of a scenic layout. Likewise RTR coaches that seem too dark out of the box look somehow natural on a layout. So I took a pragmatic view and now spray all my own coaches to match Bachmann 'Porthole' stock. Some I did a few years ago vary of course, but this merely mirrors real life and all are within the accepted spectrum of darkening or bleaching with age. 

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More progress on the Dia 174 BSK. Other side now lined, roof painted and underframe has had a coat of frame dirt.

post-98-0-91570700-1433680468_thumb.jpg

Body is still just sitting on underframe, needs attaching plus couplings. I was going to have a go at glazing it, but can't find any clear plasticard. A few more decals to go on too - I shall have to cut and shut to get the correct number, and then there is that tiny GUARD thingy, plus load restriction signs. All in all I'm not too unhappy with how it looks, though Irfanview has decided to make my lining look even more wonky than it really is.

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If the handles are separate fittings? , it would have been much easier to do the lining before fitting them. I presume you are fitting Roof boards mounting brackets too.

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