Jump to content

Recommended Posts

There was the minor problem of a lack of foreign exchange to fund imports post WW2, a situation which lasted into the 1960s, and a perceived need to support British engineering for strategic reasons. Britain was not the only country in this position; France also opted for home-produced diesels against imports from North America, despite the success of the 1-4-1R steam locos and Baldwin A1A-A1A diesels that had been supplied as part of Marshall Aid

UK industry could have produced proven equipment under licence.  They did with the hydraulics.  Without government interference, the ECML and South Wales lines at least could have been electrified; which could have led to a HST with pantographs, as was suggested in Australia.  Regarding the ECML and the use of Deltics-a great machine, and a favourite of mine-could we see some through life costs for these versus WCML first generation electrics?  

At least in modelling terms, we have a fantastic choice of locomotives and rolling stock, so it's not all bad.  I have just seen a photo of a scratch built DES1 shunter-a Mike Edge masterpiece-which incidentally spent time at New England.  Can we crowdfund for a kit?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the greatest irony of the situation is that it is now more cost-effective to refurbish legacy diesels to comply with EU emission regulations than to build new ones - so we now see Deltics back in regular service, along with veterans like class 47 and 37, and even the old Southern Electro-diesels being re-engined and modernised to bring them up to present day standards and type 3 ratings.

 

Funny old world!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the greatest irony of the situation is that it is now more cost-effective to refurbish legacy diesels to comply with EU emission regulations than to build new ones - so we now see Deltics back in regular service, along with veterans like class 47 and 37, and even the old Southern Electro-diesels being re-engined and modernised to bring them up to present day standards and type 3 ratings.

 

Funny old world!

The 73s are a funny case; part of the reason for keeping them is apparently that they can work engineer's trains on Thameslink, other types being out-of-gauge. Apart from them, I can't think of any 'legacy' diesels that are being re-engineered to comply with the new emission regulations; the 57s were re-engined, but with second-hand American engines.

Link to post
Share on other sites

HSTs? I know it wasn't to do with emission regs, but it worked out cheaper to refurb than replace.

 

My Wife's cousin is something very high up in one of the Leasing companies and he says that Euro 6 is a nightmare, because the emission control equipment means it is nearly impossible to build a compliant loco and stay within loading gauge and length / axle weight requirements to give decent RA, hence the mad dash to find serviceable legacy diesels or hire in diesels that have been sold for preservation.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's coming to something when the orange lining is far better (less garish) on a Railroad beasty than on the full-fat version.

 

This is no disrespect to the builder. I have no doubt they are to scale and all that but those in-yer-face poles are one of those instances when less is more, as quick frankly they are an eyesore. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently SWMBO reckons its a Catfish, not a Dogfish (and trust me she knows her 'fishkind's!).

 

Trust a duck not to know the difference between cats n dogs... (a potentially fatal mistake I would have thought?)

 

TPs are simply awesome!

Edited by LNER4479
Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently SWMBO reckons its a Catfish, not a Dogfish (and trust me she knows her 'fishkind's!).

 

Trust a duck not to know the difference between cats n dogs... (a potentially fatal mistake I would have thought?)

 

TPs are simply awesome!

Nah, tis a Dogfish...honestly. 

The poles were planted after carefully assessing their height. Yes, they really are rather in yer mush, however they really were a feature around the Station Forecourt (and the small Engineers' yard just north of the Station). Fine, technical equipment was used to create the groundwork/holes and special tools were employed on the pole shortening operation. Any GPO Linemen out there, look away now is my advice! Field surveys were carried out to confirm the positioning of the 'Dock Pole'. (That's where an incident happened involving some car park fencing.......oops). Must not have been a thorough Risk Assessment carried out prior to work. 

Quackers.

 

Edit: pole shortening and planting was carried out after the pics were taken. This was due to me trying to find a suitable drill that wouldn't damage the buildings during the work.

Edited by Mallard60022
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably  photo angles etc, but the poles look far too high from the ground?

 

Comparing the heights e.g on the original photo with Royal Mail van  with the model with BR van they look far too high perhaps that is the reason for their prominence? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

I agree, with micklner, the telegraph poles are a bit too tall at the moment, but easy to adjust and better too long than too short. I think they're a bit too intrusive at the moment as coachman says, but I reckon once Gilbert has worked his weathering magic, they will be far less "in Yer Face".

 

They certainly add something to the scene, in my view, one of those things that you don't really notice, and yet once there, really add an air of reality.

 

Coach said they are an eyesore, but If you look back at photos of the prototype, that's what the skyline really looked like, very cluttered, with wires going everywhere. I don't suggest you take it to that level of verisimilitude though Gilbert, you'll go quackers with the photoshopping :)

 

Great photos again, and nice poles, Duck.

 

Al.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

FDS! (For Duck's Sake) The poles are a triumph! Well done Phil. I have a slight concern about their snagging potential for the proud operator, but a rapid learning process may avoid too many problems. Marvellous work.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Gilbert and Duck, with the greatest respect and positivity, I'm going to stick my neck out and use my architectural eye on this one:

 

Duck the telegraph poles are impressive, HOWEVER, being absolutely empirical, I would say that - taking the famous one with 17 struts in front of the station, if you compare the photo that started it all (image 4, post #7905), to the model (image 5) the issue is I believe this:

 

It is not that the poles are too high per se, but that the struts are slightly too far apart, so the proportions are the issue.

 

If in the original you measure the distance between strut 1 and 17, you can see that it is approximately 4/5ths of the height of the 2 storey building in the original photo.

Compare this with the model (image 5) and the struts span approximately 6/5ths of the height of the 2 storey building.

 

Anyway, I hope this is taken in the spirit of helpful constructive advice!  I'll get my (GPO) coat.

 

Matt

Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently SWMBO reckons its a Catfish, not a Dogfish (and trust me she knows her 'fishkind's!).

 

Trust a duck not to know the difference between cats n dogs... (a potentially fatal mistake I would have thought?)

 

TPs are simply awesome!

It's a Dogfish, though the side shutes seem to be missing; the give-away's the three operating wheels, one for each shute.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Gilbert and Duck, with the greatest respect and positivity, I'm going to stick my neck out and use my architectural eye on this one:

 

Duck the telegraph poles are impressive, HOWEVER, being absolutely empirical, I would say that - taking the famous one with 17 struts in front of the station, if you compare the photo that started it all (image 4, post #7905), to the model (image 5) the issue is I believe this:

 

It is not that the poles are too high per se, but that the struts are slightly too far apart, so the proportions are the issue.

 

If in the original you measure the distance between strut 1 and 17, you can see that it is approximately 4/5ths of the height of the 2 storey building in the original photo.

Compare this with the model (image 5) and the struts span approximately 6/5ths of the height of the 2 storey building.

 

Anyway, I hope this is taken in the spirit of helpful constructive advice!  I'll get my (GPO) coat.

 

Matt

Yes, that's fine thanks. I have to admit that I had no idea what I was doing with these things. However, I have a little excuse in that the construction is limited somewhat by the actual struts/pots (they are white metal castings). I can't complain at all as I have been gifted those by a friend's friend. Had I used pots with J fittings from Express Models and a more 'authentic' strut, I think it would have produced a finer model. By that  I mean fine as in thinness and correct dimensions). However, I thinlk I would have gone bonkers trying to make it. 

Express models poles RTR are very fine indeed, beautifully made and exceptional value. However, Gilber reckoned the 'Beast' would have cost at least £100! This one and all the others cost him the brass bits and that was the price of a good curry.

As time passes, if Gilbert and myself think the look is not good enough then there will be a rethink. I suppose we hadn't really made it clear that these are a bit of a prototype project to see if they 'fit in' around the station.

If Gilbert is too polite to say they don't look 'right' then I shall say it for him. Time will tell.

P

Edited by Mallard60022
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Whether or not the poles are perfect, they certainly look the part. Without them the model looks bare when compared with photographs of the real thing.

 

(I hope that makes sense)

 

Very dedicated modelling by Mr Duck.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Members

My brief to Phil was to go no further than making a representation of the poles. I specifically said that I didn't want him to spend a ridiculous amount of time on them, firstly because he was doing me a great favour by doing them anyway, and secondly because I knew we had no chance of getting them exactly right. He has, I suspect, put more time into it than I wished, and the results are brilliant.

 

Don't worry Gilbert, they'll look splendid once you've finished wiring them all up ;)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

FDS! (For Duck's Sake) The poles are a triumph! Well done Phil. I have a slight concern about their snagging potential for the proud operator, but a rapid learning process may avoid too many problems. Marvellous work.

 

It just amazes me how people are so quick off the mark to criticise something they have neither seen nor would even attempt to model. :nono:

Living here I've seen the originals, lent on them, probably tried to climb them, those poles are the dogs bo**ocks.   Well done Mr Duck, Peterborough just wasn't Peterborough without them. :declare:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.