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great northern

Peterborough North

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9 hours ago, trw1089 said:

Hope the heel gets better soon Gilbert.  I do like the under the roof shot of No.10, it must have been a smoky noisy place when trains were running through.

I reckon it would have been smoky most of the time, but then we were used to living in smoky atmosphere if we were town or city dwellers. Think of the reaction if something like that existed now!

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This highly important question was discussed with Mick Moore at EM North only recently.  We concluded that they're tubes if they're used inside a larger piece of machinery and pipes if they aren't.

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32 minutes ago, jwealleans said:

This highly important question was discussed with Mick Moore at EM North only recently.  We concluded that they're tubes if they're used inside a larger piece of machinery and pipes if they aren't.

In submarines  pipes can be any shape or size. Tubes, on the other hand have doors on them and normally have torpedoes in them.. although the whole submarine is a tube. It is closed at both ends.

Baz

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Gilbert I'm glad you took the last photo, it reminds of times I've arrived on a platform or looked over the lineside fence to just miss the loco and see an interesting set of wagons trundling by. Quite evocative. To me railways are more than big express trains and named locos.

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As it happens, pipes and/or tubes are on my to do list at present. I've read a very helpful thread on here, and now have to work out what to do, although if they should be sheeted over, it doesn't really matter, does it?

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3 hours ago, Barry O said:

It is closed at both ends.

Just as well.

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4 minutes ago, great northern said:

Hi Gilbert

 

What colour? It depends on the material they have been made from, if it is fresh from the factory/steel works or if it has been in storage and was it stored in or outdoors? So greys of 50 various hues, browns and rust or if concrete a concrete colour. Then some pipes were made from clay so a glazed earthen wear brown. Must not forget a splatering of white dots on the tops where the pigeons, seagulls and crows perched on them last night while in the yard at Thornaby.

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16 hours ago, great northern said:

Shall we have another of those foreign visitors? This one is even more unlikely to have ever ventured within 200 miles of Peterborough.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/1610305231_82421.JPG.e7edb0e953d0d891222c01f34b530ffd.JPG

Any excuse for a pre grouping 4.4.0. though.

 

Back to normal now, and another 9F brings empties along the Down slow.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/1058333923_59F1.JPG.20f9ebba6c3640b9610424643ea306b0.JPG

 

Sometimes I take a photo, and then wonder later why I did it. This is one of those.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/349954236_4pipes.JPG.300d8b754c824e5d6cffc418a2d1791b.JPG

Some pipes, or are they tubes?

They can't be tubes - proper colour for those is red, though nowadays they only have red on each end! The rest is white and blue....

 

Stewart

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Humbrol 100 as a base, I think, Gilbert.  I mixed other colours in - a spot of white or yellow, or maybe even a tiny amount of brown - so each pipe is a fractionally different shade.

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10 hours ago, great northern said:

Some black and white tonight. More coal empties, and a WD you have seen many times before.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/982044941_1WD1.JPG.6035f93c05781418c10533e208e476d2.JPG

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/646144140_2WD2.JPG.b31f0633a5bba63191c9f0a94c2c1607.JPG

Only now does it occur to me that I bought a lens hood for shots like these.

 

I do like these little D30 locos, so we shall have a bonus shot of this one.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/9_2421_2.JPG.cf0f462359e4214ddfe479cea74a3649.JPG

 

 

 

Hi Gilbert 

 

A great looking locomotive.

 

Regards

 

David

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15 hours ago, great northern said:

Some black and white tonight. More coal empties, and a WD you have seen many times before.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/982044941_1WD1.JPG.6035f93c05781418c10533e208e476d2.JPG

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/646144140_2WD2.JPG.b31f0633a5bba63191c9f0a94c2c1607.JPG

Only now does it occur to me that I bought a lens hood for shots like these.

 

I do like these little D30 locos, so we shall have a bonus shot of this one.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/9_2421_2.JPG.cf0f462359e4214ddfe479cea74a3649.JPG

 

 

 

Gilbert

 

It was only withdrawn in 1960, so still running in 1958. It may have lost its way somewhere!

 

Re the pipes or tubes controversy, various suggestions including

1) Pipes are measured by internal diameter, tubes by external size

2) Pipes are for conveying liquids or gasses through, tubes are for structural work

 

I can't say that I like either particularly, but a trainload could well be a mixture of pipes and tubes. As to colour, Clive has fairly well covered it. I would add that Cast Iron pipes were spun in the Nottingham/Derby area if I remember correctly, and they tended to be painted black. They would normally have a spigot at one end, though, which would be quite fiddly to model. Larger concrete pipes would also usually have a different shaped spigot at one end.  From a couple of photos that I have looked at, both showing GWR practice though, both show the load uncovered, just chained down. One of them is tubes, but the other is cast iron pipes from Staveley Co. of Chesterfield (I think). Each of these pipes had 'STAVELEY Co.' in largish white letters on the side (Fig 299 in GWR Freight Wagons & Loads by J.H.Russell. From Chesterfield, they may well have come through Peterborough either on the ECML or Leicester to GE destinations.

 

Does anyone know if the Tallington precast concrete works produced pipes or other items at that time, as they may have gone by rail.

 

Lloyd

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1 hour ago, FarrMan said:

Gilbert

 

It was only withdrawn in 1960, so still running in 1958. It may have lost its way somewhere!

 

Re the pipes or tubes controversy, various suggestions including

1) Pipes are measured by internal diameter, tubes by external size

2) Pipes are for conveying liquids or gasses through, tubes are for structural work

 

I can't say that I like either particularly, but a trainload could well be a mixture of pipes and tubes. As to colour, Clive has fairly well covered it. I would add that Cast Iron pipes were spun in the Nottingham/Derby area if I remember correctly, and they tended to be painted black. They would normally have a spigot at one end, though, which would be quite fiddly to model. Larger concrete pipes would also usually have a different shaped spigot at one end.  From a couple of photos that I have looked at, both showing GWR practice though, both show the load uncovered, just chained down. One of them is tubes, but the other is cast iron pipes from Staveley Co. of Chesterfield (I think). Each of these pipes had 'STAVELEY Co.' in largish white letters on the side (Fig 299 in GWR Freight Wagons & Loads by J.H.Russell. From Chesterfield, they may well have come through Peterborough either on the ECML or Leicester to GE destinations.

 

Does anyone know if the Tallington precast concrete works produced pipes or other items at that time, as they may have gone by rail.

 

Lloyd

Very useful thank you Lloyd. I had assumed that Staveley would be a likely source for this traffic, and that it would come down via Colwick to New England, and then be attached to a train from there to London.  It seems I may be correct. Andy Rush told me to attach both pipes and tubes to the rear of one of my coal trains, so that is what I have done, but only several years later have I got round to giving them loads.

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18 minutes ago, Oldddudders said:

The tail-lamp on the leading coach is a bit de trop......

It is Ian, but as the formation is required to run in both directions, it is correct 50% of the time, which for an idle old sod like me is just about acceptable.  Pragmatic, that's what it is. Much better description than idle, that is.

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