Jump to content

great northern

Peterborough North

Recommended Posts

On 10/10/2019 at 18:38, great northern said:

Right, I think I see the problem now. I tried to get the camera as near to the edge of the platform as it would go,without falling off, and I must have overdone it slightly.

Hi Gilbert

 

I use to have large Digital SLR a Canon 5D MK11 a superb camera but I found it very bulky to use on Model Railway photography, I have since sold the camera and lenses to find my Haymarket 64B Layout.

 

I also have a Canon G1X again a superb camera and I found it much better for Model Railway Photography but close focusing was an issue.

 

I always thought I was fairly knowledgeable with the G1X until I visited Tony to see his Little Bytham layout and the things he showed me on using my G1X have helped me enormously with my photography.

 

Following you on your Peterborough North thread and seeing your photographic results I purchased a second hand Canon G12 the same as the camera you use and it’s been brilliant in every way and very similar to the G1X.

 

I can understand when positioning  the camera on the actual layout itself it can sometimes cause problems so I now alway mount the camera on a tripod use the self timer and the highest aperture f8 and use the zoom to get closer to the subject I am photographing.

 

im obviously not sure if you have the space around your layout to be able to position a tripod?

 

I also do what they call photo stacking so nearly all the photo from foreground to the very limits of the background are all in focus.

 

I do not have a photo stacking editing program on my computer so I take about 10 photos of each shot on the manual focusing setting adjusting the depth of field each time then using photoshop elements 12 I overlay each photo one on top of  the other using the layers method and brushing in the parts of each background I require just like you would if you were adding a new sky background to your photo.

 

its a bit of a long winded process but you do get a nice end result with the photo in reasonable focus from the foreground through to the back.

 

I do also appreciate that your Peterborough North Layout is far larger than my Haymarket Layout so it may not be as straight forward for you but I am sure there must be some viewpoints on your layout where a tripod could be used.

 

But either way and sorry to waffle on I do thoroughly enjoy the photos you produce in focus or not.

 

Regards

 

David

 

Edited by landscapes
Spelling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, landscapes said:

Hi Gilbert

 

I use to have large Digital SLR a Canon 5D MK11 a superb camera but I found it very bulky to use on Model Railway photography, I have since sold the camera and lenses to find my Haymarket 64B Layout.

 

I also have a Canon G1X again a superb camera and I found it much better for Model Railway Photography but close focusing was an issue.

 

I always thought I was fairly knowledgeable with the G1X until I visited Tony to see his Little Bytham layout and the things he showed me on using my G1X have helped me enormously with my photography.

 

Following you on your Peterborough North thread and seeing your photographic results I purchased a second hand Canon G12 the same as the camera you use and it’s been brilliant in every way and very similar to the G1X.

 

I can understand when positioning  the camera on the actual layout itself it can sometimes cause problems so I now alway mount the camera on a tripod use the self timer and the highest aperture f8 and use the zoom to get closer to the subject I am photographing.

 

im obviously not sure if you have the space around your layout to be able to position a tripod?

 

I also do what they call photo stacking so nearly all the photo from foreground to the very limits of the background are all in focus.

 

I do not have a photo stacking editing program on my computer so I take about 10 photos of each shot on the manual focusing setting adjusting the depth of field each time then using photoshop elements 12 I overlay each photo one on top of  the other using the layers method and brushing in the parts of each background I require just like you would if you were adding a new sky background to your photo.

 

its a bit of a long winded process but you do get a nice end result with the photo in reasonable focus from the foreground through to the back.

 

I do also appreciate that your Peterborough North Layout is far larger than my Haymarket Layout so it may not be as straight forward for you but I am sure there must be some viewpoints on your layout where a tripod could be used.

 

But either way and sorry to waffle on I do thoroughly enjoy the photos you produce in focus or not.

 

Regards

 

David

 

You're way ahead of me here David. As I've said before, my knowledge is basic, both of photography and photoshopping. I do have a cheap and nasty tripod, but I rarely use it. The camera sits on something which I judge to be the right height to give me what I want. It is usually an empty wagon box, or occasionally two. I did try to read up on how to do the stacking stuff, but it just made my brain hurt, so I do without it. If I get good depth of field it is often a fluke.

 

I've graduated fron using the auto feature on the G12 to setting everything manually, but there are still goodness knows how many features of the camera about which I know nothing. Ignorance is bliss sums it up really.

  • Like 1
  • Friendly/supportive 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gilbert

 

Just been away for a few days, so catching up with PN.

 

Re tripod for photos, we used to use a small bean bag to sit the camera on if there was not room for even a small tripod. It would take up the shape of whatever surface it was on and still give the SLR a firm support.

 

Re banking out of platform 3, I do not remember seeing this occuring - though my memories are more of early to mid 1960's. What I do remember, though, was the almost universal wheel slip on pulling away, though usually after a couple of spin sessions it would settle down. I have always put that down to the trailing wheels. The normal GWR express locos were all 4-6-0, and so all the weight settled back onto the driving wheels when pulling away, which made them generally more sure footed. Of course, the length of runs on GWR tended to be shorter, so not the same need for fuel capacity as for the longer ECML runs. As for flats on rolling stock, i thought that that was more likely to be caused by sticking brakes, etc.. Surely if the wheel is spinning it would wear down the whole circumference, and one spot on the track, rather than cause flats on the wheels. A stuck wheel being dragged along would spread the damage on the track, but confine the damage on the wheel to one position, causing the lack of circularity.

 

Yet again, lovely photos of a wonderful model that is so accurate and lifelike. Thanks for keeping up with it for so long.

 

Lloyd

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flat tyres were the usual result of sticking/overbraking.  I managed 6 flats on an Army {LMR} Austerity 0-6-0ST, coming round a corner and finding the Home at stop.  Got a 5 mile long bo**ocking for that - I didn't know I had quite so many names!!

 

Isn't the spinning wheels on passenger expresses a way to find the maximum regulator setting, for the conditions of the day.  Open until you get the spin and immediately back off until it stops, leaving it "near" maximum accelleration.

 

Julian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jcredfer said:

Flat tyres were the usual result of sticking/overbraking.  I managed 6 flats on an Army {LMR} Austerity 0-6-0ST, coming round a corner and finding the Home at stop.  Got a 5 mile long bo**ocking for that - I didn't know I had quite so many names!!

 

Isn't the spinning wheels on passenger expresses a way to find the maximum regulator setting, for the conditions of the day.  Open until you get the spin and immediately back off until it stops, leaving it "near" maximum accelleration.

 

Julian

 

Drivers of steam era expresses weren’t really interested in maximum acceleration from a “cold” start with a heavy train otherwise  half the contents of the fire box would be blown through the chimney and there would be great holes in the fire bed, much to the fireman’s chagrin ! Most long distance drivers were content to make a relatively slow start and drop a couple of minutes knowing they could easily make it up when they fire started to settle and the loco got warmed up.

The was once an interesting comparison in Trains Illustrated between a Britannia Pacific and a class 40 diesel on the racing ground between Ipswich and Norwich.  The Diesel was quicker away from Ipswich but by the time they got to Diss the the diesel was doing 90 mph and the Britannia had been worked up to 96mph so they both had approximately the same net time over the 47 miles.

 

  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jazzer said:

 

Drivers of steam era expresses weren’t really interested in maximum acceleration from a “cold” start with a heavy train otherwise  half the contents of the fire box would be blown through the chimney and there would be great holes in the fire bed, much to the fireman’s chagrin ! Most long distance drivers were content to make a relatively slow start and drop a couple of minutes knowing they could easily make it up when they fire started to settle and the loco got warmed up.

The was once an interesting comparison in Trains Illustrated between a Britannia Pacific and a class 40 diesel on the racing ground between Ipswich and Norwich.  The Diesel was quicker away from Ipswich but by the time they got to Diss the the diesel was doing 90 mph and the Britannia had been worked up to 96mph so they both had approximately the same net time over the 47 miles.

 

 

Thank you, interesting indeed.

 

Julian

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, jazzer said:

 

Drivers of steam era expresses weren’t really interested in maximum acceleration from a “cold” start with a heavy train otherwise  half the contents of the fire box would be blown through the chimney and there would be great holes in the fire bed, much to the fireman’s chagrin ! Most long distance drivers were content to make a relatively slow start and drop a couple of minutes knowing they could easily make it up when they fire started to settle and the loco got warmed up.

The was once an interesting comparison in Trains Illustrated between a Britannia Pacific and a class 40 diesel on the racing ground between Ipswich and Norwich.  The Diesel was quicker away from Ipswich but by the time they got to Diss the the diesel was doing 90 mph and the Britannia had been worked up to 96mph so they both had approximately the same net time over the 47 miles.

 

I didn't think that the class 40's could do 90. I though the best that they could do was about 75 or 80? Thankfully they did not last very long on the ECML.

 

Lloyd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, FarrMan said:

I didn't think that the class 40's could do 90. I though the best that they could do was about 75 or 80? Thankfully they did not last very long on the ECML.

 

Lloyd

Hi Lloyd

 

They lasted up to about 1980 on passenger trains.

 

Trainspotting in the south east of England during the late 60s early 70s 2000s were quite rare in our area, it was only the ECML were we saw them regularly. But why was it always D252 that would shatter our hope of a cop. :ireful:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coming back to spotting in around 73, a visit to Kings Cross in 74 produced a class 40 allocated to somewhere called Healey Mills.

Also produced dreams of a childhood crush....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Clive Mortimore said:

Hi Lloyd

 

They lasted up to about 1980 on passenger trains.

 

Trainspotting in the south east of England during the late 60s early 70s 2000s were quite rare in our area, it was only the ECML were we saw them regularly. But why was it always D252 that would shatter our hope of a cop. https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_ireful1.gif

D251 at Lincoln on the York-Yarmouth in 1960 Clive. Week in, week out.

  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, FarrMan said:

I didn't think that the class 40's could do 90. I though the best that they could do was about 75 or 80? Thankfully they did not last very long on the ECML.

 

Lloyd

Hi Lloyd,

The class 40’s were a bit of an enigma in a way. Far too heavy and basically superseded in performances by the Class 47’s that came about 4 years later and which were both more powerful and lighter.  The  class 40’s were rated at 90 mph maximum which they were able to achieve on Liverpool St - Norwich where loads were usually 9 coaches. However British Railways had these new diesels which were really no better in terms of performance than the steam locos they were intended to replace, and in some cases worse but still had to promote the Modernisation Scheme. It was one thing to match a Class 7 out of Liverpool St but something quite different to put them in place of a Class 8 on a heavy train on the ECML or WCML .  There are records of Class 40s struggling over Shap losing time with 15 coaches on the drawbar, while a Duchess which was specifically designed to cope with 15 coaches over Shap was following behind with an lightweight 8 coach relief which hardly taxed it at all. Such was the befuddled thinking in some parts of British Railways management in the early days of the Modernisation Scheme.

  • Agree 5
  • Informative/Useful 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gilbert, could I trouble you for the Diagram of the Gresley 3 Compartment Brake in the last picture. I know it's not a Dia. 175 but other than that I am struggling.My only idea is a Diagram 174,but that's grasping at straws a little.

Regards,Derek.

Edited by CUTLER2579
Added a Guess..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, CUTLER2579 said:

Gilbert, could I trouble you for the Diagram of the Gresley 3 Compartment Brake in the last picture. I know it's not a Dia. 175 but other than that I am struggling.My only idea is a Diagram 174,but that's grasping at straws a little.

Regards,Derek.

It is Comet based Derek, and described as Dia 40A/174, so you were grasping at the right straw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many thanks Gilbert, Igot my straw from the "Isinglass" website,now all I need is to find a Kit in 7MM Scale.:wub:

Thanks for such a prompt reply. At least our Duck from Retford will be happy in this weather.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, jazzer said:

Hi Lloyd,

The class 40’s were a bit of an enigma in a way. Far too heavy and basically superseded in performances by the Class 47’s that came about 4 years later and which were both more powerful and lighter.  The  class 40’s were rated at 90 mph maximum which they were able to achieve on Liverpool St - Norwich where loads were usually 9 coaches. However British Railways had these new diesels which were really no better in terms of performance than the steam locos they were intended to replace, and in some cases worse but still had to promote the Modernisation Scheme. It was one thing to match a Class 7 out of Liverpool St but something quite different to put them in place of a Class 8 on a heavy train on the ECML or WCML .  There are records of Class 40s struggling over Shap losing time with 15 coaches on the drawbar, while a Duchess which was specifically designed to cope with 15 coaches over Shap was following behind with an lightweight 8 coach relief which hardly taxed it at all. Such was the befuddled thinking in some parts of British Railways management in the early days of the Modernisation Scheme.

From all the recorded logs of journeys I've seen they certainly didn't seem to be any imprvement on a Pacific in reasonable condition. I do wonder though if there was another factor to consider. Sitting in the cab of a Type 4, however underpowered, must have seemed rather nice than when compared with with being thrown about on a rough riding steam engine, so how much influence might their views have had, via the unions, of course?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, great northern said:

From all the recorded logs of journeys I've seen they certainly didn't seem to be any imprvement on a Pacific in reasonable condition. I do wonder though if there was another factor to consider. Sitting in the cab of a Type 4, however underpowered, must have seemed rather nice than when compared with with being thrown about on a rough riding steam engine, so how much influence might their views have had, via the unions, of course?

 

What constitutes rough riding was a bit of a subjective test, depending on what people were used to. For example , the Stratford men thought the  Britannias were wonderful after their rough old B17’s but the Old Oak Common men thought they were awful compared to their Castles !  

 

I have never ridden on a steam engine at speed but I once had a cab ride in a class 47 to Manningtree and another one back to Liverpool St and both were kind of Ok but it wasn’t like riding in a coach. 

 

Driver Joe Duddington when describing his world record breaking run on Mallard said the ride started to get very rough at 70mph but as the speed rose Mallard became very smooth and started to glide over the track , so make what you will of that !

 

Incidentally, there is an excellent  BTC video on YouTube called “ Elizabethan Express”  describing every aspect of the Elizbethans journey in 1953 .There are some great shots in the cab during and after the crew change which seems to show the cab remarkably  smooth, clean and tidy, and the fireman , Mungo Scot is wearing, not boots but immaculate brogue shoes , which he somehow managed to keep clean while firing so cab  conditions couldn’t have been that bad !

 

Edited by jazzer
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, jazzer said:

 

What constitutes rough riding was a bit of a subjective test, depending on what people were used to. For example , the Stratford men thought the  Britannias were wonderful after their rough old B17’s but the Old Oak Common men thought they were awful compared to their Castles !  

 

I have never ridden on a steam engine at speed but I once had a cab ride in a class 47 to Manningtree and another one back to Liverpool St and both were kind of Ok but it wasn’t like riding in a coach. 

 

Driver Joe Duddington when describing his world record breaking run on Mallard said the ride started to get very rough at 70mph but as the speed rose Mallard became very smooth and started to glide over the track , so make what you will of that !

 

Incidentally, there is an excellent  BTC video on YouTube called “ Elizabethan Express”  describing every aspect of the Elizbethans journey in 1953 .There are some great shots in the cab during and after the crew change which seems to show the cab remarkably  smooth, clean and tidy, and the fireman , Mungo Scot is wearing, not boots but immaculate brogue shoes , which he somehow managed to keep clean while firing so cab  conditions couldn’t have been that bad !

 

G'day Folks

 

Have had Many class 47 cab rides, I always found them to be very steady riders, but then I was working on the ECML. The 47's had a gentle 'rock/sway' when moving, Class 31's were pretty good as well, class 46's, good ride and quiet. class 40, Bit on the uncomfortable side, not bad riding. Deltic's, didn't like them much, but they had speed.

 

manna

 

PS. I did hear of a story, how true I don't know, A driver was booked a Diesel loco and turned up for work with 'Carpet' slippers on, but the Diesel failed, and they gave him a Pacific, the Air went 'Blue'.

Edited by manna
Added interest.
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, manna said:

PS. I did hear of a story, how true I don't know, A driver was booked a Diesel loco and turned up for work with 'Carpet' slippers on, but the Diesel failed, and they gave him a Pacific, the Air went 'Blue'.

I seem to recall this story, and the version I read was that the driver was booked for one or both of the ex LMS diesels 10000 oe 10001,  which failed, and he had to work the turn was 71000,  Duke Of Gloucester, which was then greatly disliked by most of not all Crewe North men.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stock for the 4.32 to Harwich is brought in by yet another very clean engine, while the B1 waits for a path to New England.

 

 

1480650647_1916351.JPG.fcd844e0e9805ca1bd1ac7780542b785.JPG

Another under roof shot, but positioning not quite as good as it could have been.

 

 

5537181_201635under.JPG.8c59d9e0b3320a4c3c9a9e9de38b673e.JPG

This needed 13 seconds exposure, as I recall, and was asking a bit much of the camera.

 

Car has just gone in for service and MOT. I wonder how many A4s that is going to cost me?

  • Like 14
  • Friendly/supportive 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.