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great northern

Peterborough North

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15 hours ago, Mallard60022 said:

Although quite an elegant thing is the castle, it is still rather a weak machine and needs hauling around by the most elegant of Pacifics to grace the rails.....

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/image.png.32d9cde3d23c8c4c94dbbbc0f6aaf2af.png

Bye......

 

I would suggest that, in line with Western practice, the Bulleid thing is the train engine and that the Castle coupled inside is the 'pilot' because the inferior engine cannot manage it's train even on the flat section at Dawlish Warren.... 

 

Running for cover...

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Given the long memory of what Mr. Bulleid must have felt like when he saw the cables outperform his beloved A3s in the engine exchanges, I suspect he'd see this sa metic justice. But then I also heard that the difference turned out to be down to a combination of Welsh Coal and Swindon's ability to align loco chassis rather well.

 

When you look at how precise manufacturing has changed the way cars are made and how much longer they run with minimal faults it does make you wonder what could be achieved today with CAD, robotic manufacturing and the kind of precision tolerances HNG and others could only dream of?

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22 minutes ago, bigwordsmith said:

Given the long memory of what Mr. Bulleid must have felt like when he saw the cables outperform his beloved A3s in the engine exchanges, I suspect he'd see this sa metic justice. But then I also heard that the difference turned out to be down to a combination of Welsh Coal and Swindon's ability to align loco chassis rather well.

 

When you look at how precise manufacturing has changed the way cars are made and how much longer they run with minimal faults it does make you wonder what could be achieved today with CAD, robotic manufacturing and the kind of precision tolerances HNG and others could only dream of?

 

I've often thought about the good work done by artisans in the workshops using relatively basic measuring equipment, tools and machines in badly lit workshops. Not all of those people would have had good eyesight and this before the days of National Health eyecare. 

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Given the long memory of what Mr. Bulleid must have felt like when he saw the cables outperform his beloved A3s in the engine exchanges, I suspect he'd see this sa metic justice. But then I also heard that the difference turned out to be down to a combination of Welsh Coal and Swindon's ability to align loco chassis rather well.

 

They'd be A1s when they were tried against the Castles and the later excellence of the A3s illustrates the potential which existed in the design and how well the lessons were learned. 

 

I've read - from a Doncaster alumnus but I forget which - that the story of the effect of optical alignment is also exaggerated, as they took one of the locos so reconstructed out into the yard, parked it on a curve and found with a piece of string that the frames had deflected a couple of inches end to end.

 

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2 hours ago, TrevorP1 said:

 

I would suggest that, in line with Western practice, the Bulleid thing is the train engine and that the Castle coupled inside is the 'pilot' because the inferior engine cannot manage it's train even on the flat section at Dawlish Warren.... 

 

Running for cover...

Not up the banks it were not buddy, between Plymuff and Newton Hallibut, so you can come out now.

Let's leave that silly nonsense there shall we as I only wanted to make Gilbert think about something other than rain.

A3s are/were magnificent and absolutely perfect for the work they did, as were the Castles and even the SR Pacifics, which were, as you may remember, along with a coupe of Brits, the last Pacifics on long distance fast passenger work (and even then I'd not class the Brits in the north as racing machines as the Mod Spams were on the Bournemouth/Weymouth, however I accept they were really only about 6 to 8 years 'old'). 

Ar$£

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History shows that we all learn from someone else. It's a fool who doesn't incorporate something from someone else's design which improves his/her own, whatever tribal loyalties there may be.

 

There's an awful lot now that we can do that those who came before us couldn't, but I just wonder whether the construction of wonders of the ancient world with the very basic resources and tools available at the time should rank as highly as what we do now, which is still mostly based on principles that they worked out!

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1 minute ago, Mallard60022 said:

Not up the banks it were not buddy, between Plymuff and Newton Hallibut, so you can come out now.

Let's leave that silly nonsense there shall we as I only wanted to make Gilbert think about something other than rain.

A3s are/were magnificent and absolutely perfect for the work they did, as were the Castles and even the SR Pacifics, which were, as you may remember, along with a coupe of Brits, the last Pacifics on long distance fast passenger work (and even then I'd not class the Brits in the north as racing machines as the Mod Spams were on the Bournemouth/Weymouth, however I accept they were really only about 6 to 8 years 'old'). 

Ar$£

I think we were nearly saying the same thing at the same time there Phil. Anyway, it is sunny here today, my smart meter is not in demented mode, and I am running and photographing trains. This is lunch break, by the way.

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3 hours ago, great northern said:

Another look at Enterprise this bright fine morning.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/779972910_21112.JPG.e6eb2667b295dba03f922e02c90f990c.JPG

after which we shall examine the rather eclectic mix of stock following on behind.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/1957971582_3rake1.JPG.07e30042bb6716c0f768974bc0de7c57.JPG

...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each time I see your BZ it strikes me as a rather lovely thing. I'm still amazed no RTR manufacturer has produced one.

 

Paul

 

 

 

 

Edited by Fenman
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45 minutes ago, Fenman said:

 

 

 

Each time I see your BZ it strikes me as a rather lovely thing. I'm still amazed no RTR manufacturer has produced one.

 

Paul

 

 

 

 

I agree Paul. It does look very nice. That didn't stop dear Mike Radford from getting a phone call telling him that it didn't look anything like a BZ, and that his kit is cr*p. From an authority on coaching stock, of course.

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2 hours ago, great northern said:

History shows that we all learn from someone else. It's a fool who doesn't incorporate something from someone else's design which improves his/her own, whatever tribal loyalties there may be.

 

There's an awful lot now that we can do that those who came before us couldn't, but I just wonder whether the construction of wonders of the ancient world with the very basic resources and tools available at the time should rank as highly as what we do now, which is still mostly based on principles that they worked out!

 

Even more so in Railway terms when you consider that George Stephenson had to teach himself to read and write and yet with the Rocket he laid down basic principles that could be seen right to the end of steam. Brunel with no one to show him how to do it, built the London and Bristol Railway to civil engineering standards that have barely been surpassed more than 170 years later. 

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1 hour ago, jazzer said:

 

Even more so in Railway terms when you consider that George Stephenson had to teach himself to read and write and yet with the Rocket he laid down basic principles that could be seen right to the end of steam. Brunel with no one to show him how to do it, built the London and Bristol Railway to civil engineering standards that have barely been surpassed more than 170 years later. 

Not to belittle George, but Rocket was the work of his son, Robert. George played no part in the design. He was a bit busy, building the L&M.

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31 minutes ago, Denbridge said:

Not to belittle George, but Rocket was the work of his son, Robert. George played no part in the design. He was a bit busy, building the L&M.

Yes a point we’ll made. Since you mention the L&M lets say then filling in Chat Moss to build the line across it , which I think is still in operation today. The point is those old railways pioneers worked so many things out themselves that still hold good today

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2 hours ago, jazzer said:

Yes a point we’ll made. Since you mention the L&M lets say then filling in Chat Moss to build the line across it , which I think is still in operation today. The point is those old railways pioneers worked so many things out themselves that still hold good today

 

Not so much filling-in Chat Moss - surely it's still there?

 

What George did was, to all intents and purposes, to 'float' the railway across Chat Moss. OK, it slowly sank to the bottom as more fill was piled on top of the floating base, but the genius was in conceiving the floating foundations. (Though I've a feeling that the Romans did something similar).

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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Here is something to complement your room Gilbert. The catalogue for Great Central Auctions 7th December sale dropped through the letterbox this morning. Within is a totem for Peterborough North (one for Peterborough East as well).....tempting?

Peterboro_North.jpg.6c0fef42f53c32cbc10eff7c97a548d4.jpg

 

I purchased a Totem for 'Sandy' about 6/7 years ago, it cost me about £2000 but it is the cleanest one I've seen. It was a lot of money but I do get a lot of satisfaction when I see it on the wall over the layout.

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47 minutes ago, chris p bacon said:

Here is something to complement your room Gilbert. The catalogue for Great Central Auctions 7th December sale dropped through the letterbox this morning. Within is a totem for Peterborough North (one for Peterborough East as well).....tempting?

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/Peterboro_North.jpg.6c0fef42f53c32cbc10eff7c97a548d4.jpg

 

I purchased a Totem for 'Sandy' about 6/7 years ago, it cost me about £2000 but it is the cleanest one I've seen. It was a lot of money but I do get a lot of satisfaction when I see it on the wall over the layout.

It would be on the "nice to have if I won the lottery" list, but I really do have quite a lot of things which would take priority for that sort of money. It has been a very expensive year!

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On 19/11/2019 at 08:31, great northern said:

Another sunny morning. The promised fog has not occurred, and the golf course is open.https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_sun_bespectacled.gif So, with carry bag, a few clubs, and some frogman's flippers, if I can get my hands on some, off I shall go a bit later on.

 

Not many A4s are seen at Platform 6, so 60010 got snapped again. This is one of the dwindling number of untimmed A4s, and it does show up in this shot.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/1716791013_10102.JPG.03bb40b98d7e591264c2ae20f278c8f3.JPG

 

The 8.30 to Melton Constable is in the bay platform. Until 1957 Melton had some Clauds, though they were mainly, if not exclusively, used on trains to Norwich and the Cromer area. Today there has been a late Ivatt failure, and so one of Spital Bridge's D16s is standing in. Did someone say that it is a New England duty, and that shed has plenty of spare Ivatts? Must be fake news.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/23682353_11Claud.JPG.0b592595ecc2b92432ac438fac10a625.JPG

 

That wonderful picture of the D16 ready to go over the M&GN reminds of a story from R. H.N . Hardy in one of the magazines some years ago.  Long before the days when Elf en Sayftee were invented , when Dick Hardy was Mechanical Foreman at South Lynn, a Claud was due to take a train out when a leaking firebox stay was discovered in the firebox , which would have needed the loco to be taken out of service and the train cancelled. But railwaymen had a strong sense of duty  in those days so the shed foreman, according to Hardy, ordered the fire to be moved across to the opposite side of the firebox, then he wrapped himself in wet sacks, climbed into the fire box hand hammered the rivet in to stop the leak and the D16 took the train out. 

 

If the story had come from from anyone else other than Dick Hardy I would have difficulty believing it but he has a whole raft of similar personal experiences from the ‘40’s and 50’s of heroic efforts railwaymen made in those time to keep the trains running , often with run down, worn out machinery, to be paid shirt buttons, with no thanks from an unappreciative public. 

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7 hours ago, great northern said:

It would be on the "nice to have if I won the lottery" list, but I really do have quite a lot of things which would take priority for that sort of money. It has been a very expensive year!

Expensive....I know exactly what you mean :rolleyes:

 

They're certainly a lottery win item, I had to build a 3 bedroom house before I could buy mine :D 

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