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as it says on the tin, is there and alternative to the ratio kit sempahore signals if id like to put working semaphors on my layout.

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gwr, im moddeling the western region in 1955ish. i will post piccies soon, at the moment its just a little plank and a few ideas.

 

thank you for your help

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gwr, im moddeling the western region in 1955ish. i will post piccies soon, at the moment its just a little plank and a few ideas.

 

thank you for your help

 

Complete kit for the tubular post type coming soon from MSE - trial etch for test building should be here next week.

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The MSE bits will certainly give you more robust signals than the Ratio bits. I have the MSE kit for a GWR wooden post signal to try sometime and its a mix of brass and whitemetal bits.

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Hornby Dublo is still available on E bay. Not the finest of scale, but they look good and work.

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Have a look at Borg-rail.com - I'm not a customer (yet) but their stuff looks interesting depending on your budget.

Chris

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I would unreservedly recommend the Wizard Models products - even if you don't want to wait for the new kit from Andrew, he should have all the individual components available now, to enable you to build the GW/W.R. signal of your choice right away...

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I would unreservedly recommend the Wizard Models products - even if you don't want to wait for the new kit from Andrew, he should have all the individual components available now, to enable you to build the GW/W.R. signal of your choice right away...

 

Can I qualify this enthusiasm with the following advice:

 

make sure your eyesight precription is up to date and you invest in some 145 and 188 deg solder. Don't try to assemble the kit with just one grade. They do produce really nice signals, but are very fiddly in places due to small parts. If you are unfamiliar with the terminology of signal conastruction you might want to do some research to assist in identifying parts etc too B)

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make sure your eyesight precription is up to date

Well, I would only make a signal these days with the help of my Optivisor!

 

 

you invest in some 145 and 188 deg solder. Don't try to assemble the kit with just one grade

I have done this with just one grade, but Redgate offers good advice, nevertheless.

 

If you are unfamiliar with the terminology of signal conastruction you might want to do some research to assist in identifying parts etc too B)

When Derek Mundy owned MSE, he produced a small A4 sized book covering essential signal terminology, construction and operation - not sure if Andrew still sells this, but if he does, it's well worth getting.

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I can reiterate the previous comments. I built a SR lattice for Orchard Road and following the recommendations on soldering and encountered no major problems (except managed to melt a small section of the whitemetal when I picked up the wrong soldering iron!!)

I also needed to keep referring to photos in books to help identify where the various bits and pieces fit.

These do take some time and patience to assemble, but produce very pleasing result.

My next job, when plucked up the courage, will be to add the operating wire, then connect to the solenoid (also supplied by Wizzard Models) under the signal.

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A little tip, I use Ratio kits, but insert the top of the kit into a brass post to give it some rigidity. There are "how to" pictures on my web site.

 

Cheers

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http://www.amazon.co...n/dp/B00161MBXQ

and http://www.amazon.co...n/dp/1905184689

 

I can whole-heartedly recommend obtaining a copies of these books if you are going to build any brass signals. All the hints, tips and techniques you'll need.

Jon F.

Dear John, I'm honored to see my book is fetching over twenty two quid secondhand on Amazon, Booklaw have new copy's for less then half that. Best Wishes, Mick.

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When Derek Mundy owned MSE, he produced a small A4 sized book covering essential signal terminology, construction and operation - not sure if Andrew still sells this, but if he does, it's well worth getting.

 

Has been out of print for several years now. Derek was intending to write a mega version of it on his retirement, but as this was 12 years ago now, I guess it's not going to happen.

 

Mick Nicholson's book is also out of print - I have a dozen or so left, Book Law may also still have some.

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Dear John, I'm honored to see my book is fetching over twenty two quid secondhand on Amazon, Best Wishes, Mick.

 

 

And worth every penny! Helped me no endcool.gif

JF

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A little tip, I use Ratio kits, but insert the top of the kit into a brass post to give it some rigidity. There are "how to" pictures on my web site.

Any chance of a quick link....

 

Looking here I couldn't readily see the topic. :(

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Complete kit for the tubular post type coming soon from MSE - trial etch for test building should be here next week.

 

This is now available (S4/KW2, £9.00 in 4mm; S7/KW2, £16.00 in 7mm), but only in limited quantities to start with due to a cock-up on the casting ordering front.

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I found Mick Nick's book invaluable when I built the signals for our club layout Battersby North End a couple of years ago. I seem to recall I picked up a copy at Warley for about £3.00. Although I'm used to soldering, this was the first time I had tried to scratchbuild signals and found the book a great source of information on both the prototype and methods of constructing the models. I used MSE etchings and castings for the arms, lanterns etc but the posts, brackets and dolls were scratchbuilt from various brass sections, rod and tubing. I would definitely recommend having a go. Some photos below.

 

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post-432-12837855199_thumb.jpg

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I would endorse Mike's comments above. Mick Nicholson's book is an invaluable guide both to constructing model signals and to illustrating how the prototypes were constructed and worked. Like Mike above, I started building model signals only a couple of years ago and that with only a very rudimentary knowledge of soldering. As well as the various etchings available from MSE there is a huge range of brass and nickel silver strip and sections available from Eileens Emporium.

 

With modelling a real location I had to find a way of producing models of some very large and quite complex signal installations, especially the lattice structures which are scratch built, the arms, lamps, levers, etc. are MSE etchings. There was much experimentation and trial and error and, believe me, there were quite a few errors along the way. Eventually, by mastering soldering to a reasonable degree and by developing methods of jig building and assembly, I found that these models could be built and could be made to work. The photo is only the third signal model I ever made, so if I can do it, then others can certainly do it.

 

All it takes is a little determination and an acceptance that you might not get it right first time, so just have a go!

 

Cheers

 

Mike

post-3150-128379972561.jpg

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Mike (Meg), I've been following your thread and some of the things you do make my efforts shown above look a little basic!

By the way I also found Finney & Smith to be a good source of brass strip, angle, rod, tube etc.

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