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the penguin of doom

The Penguins workbench - Trans Pennine transformation part 3

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Another hint?!!!!

 

I think that it might be Mike.

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I bought some of this easier to use mould gum, maybe not as fine as an RTV compound, but workable for one offs

 

http://www.homecrafts.co.uk/buy-silligum-moulding-paste-pb766329/

 

It is easy and clean to use unlike other moulding stuff which can be a bit involved and rather messy!

 

It enabled a few items to be cast for my 325. Just thinking it might aid your Axlebox project.

 

Sorry!

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Hi PoD,

 

You know your journey to the dark side of steam era modelling is nearly complete - all you have to do is get rid of that LMS machine and get a nice Castle or Pannier Tank and then you will be one of us...

 

Sorry, that got a bit Star Wars for a minute there!

 

It will be great to see a diesel chap do a kettle - interesting to see if the approach differs.

 

And a nice choice of engine too - such charachterful engines the big Moguls are they not? A sort of very butch looking 'face' on them with those big cylinders!

 

All the best,

 

Castle

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Ah, the Brassmasters detail kit. I ended up with two, to correct existing kits.....

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hi castle , he already is in the dark side ,he built an L1 for me from bitza this and that .its on here somewhere just before the Hornby release .mines the best of the 2 .mali

Hi PoD,

 

You know your journey to the dark side of steam era modelling is nearly complete - all you have to do is get rid of that LMS machine and get a nice Castle or Pannier Tank and then you will be one of us...

 

Sorry, that got a bit Star Wars for a minute there!

 

It will be great to see a diesel chap do a kettle - interesting to see if the approach differs.

 

And a nice choice of engine too - such charachterful engines the big Moguls are they not? A sort of very butch looking 'face' on them with those big cylinders!

 

All the best,

 

Castle

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My vote would be the body!

 

From memory and comments from a driver naw sadly no longer with us the chassis is good but can have loads of subtle bits and bobs added.

 

Next, I will do either the loco chassis or the main body, depending on which looks easiest.

Cheers.

Sean.

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Looks Good Sean.

 

Though are there no bolts to hold the buffers on?

 

Or have you added those since taking the picture?

 

Pete 

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Don't forget that "Crabs" in later life also have a lozenge-shaped slot in the front footplate above the steps. This was intended as an extra handhold.

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Suggest you get the RCTS book on "The Hughes and Stanier 2-6-0 s"

ISBN 090 1115 96 7

as it will answer a lot of your questions - an dyes the front steps are in the wrong place but only marginally.

Edited by Barry O

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Also, the instructions state that the injectors should be placed behind the rear cab access steps on each side and although the etch is numbered up well, the bag of whitemetal bits is just accompanied by a list. So, quick question, are these the injectors?.....

 

attachicon.gif20131031_132103.jpg

 

In addition, does anyone know which goes where?

 

See, the non steam devil strikes again! ;o)

 

Cheers.

 

Sean.

Yes, you're right, these are the injectors.

The upper one is the live steam injector and is mounted vertically behind the left hand side cab footstep. The other is the exhaust steam injector and is mounded below the cab, horizontally at about 30 degrees to the loco centre line with the smaller end outermost. A large (41/2" dia) pipe attaches to the inner end and makes its way to the smoke-box saddle.

Attached is a (slightly blurred) photo of the underside of my part completed Crab showing the injectors and associated piping.

 

post-5663-0-10271900-1383300754_thumb.jpg

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Hi Sean

 

Ok, We have all seen the many debates about some people being pro digital and others less so but I am with you in commenting on good and in this instance speedy service.

 

Good on them for their reply result all round!

 

Nice work with the tender too!

 

Edited vos my tablet has started trying to let me use writing detection, not sure if it is me, my scribing or software...but its odd.....

 

Hi all.

Just as a follow on from the above post, I received an email from Brassmasters this morning at 09:02 telling me that a replacement spring would be in the post later today. I really can't speak high enough of this company and it goes without saying that I would recommend them 100%.

Usual caveat of non affiliation etc applies.

Cheers.

Sean.

Edited by Ian Fisher
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Hi all.

 

Just a quick update to say the missing leaf spring arrived 10 minutes ago and so here is the completed tender.....

 

Cheers.

 

Sean.

10 minutes!!! What took you so long!!!!

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Hello, PoD.

 

I don't know the specifics of the 'Crabs', but modern steam locos generally had three drain cocks per side: one at each end of the cylinder (double-acting, of course), and one from the steam chest. In addition, some locos had the exhaust ejector (elbow at the smokebox) drain routed with the final run of the steam cock pipework.

 

I'll have a look at some 'Crab' images (it's a dirty job, but someone's got to do it) to see if I can be a little more definitive, if that will help.

 

Cheers,

 

BR(W).

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There is a valve chest drain pipe which emerges roughly in line with the rear cylinder drain pipe and initially runs just below it (i.e. the bottom of the 3) then, in the length that slopes down towards the steps the pipes go from being stacked vertically to being  arranged horizontally under the bottom step. Here the pipe that was lowest becomes the inner-most and the highest the out-most. That's according to the drawings, photos tend to show a rather less tidy arrangement!

 

Dave.

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Hello, PoD.

 

I don't know the specifics of the 'Crabs', but modern steam locos generally had three drain cocks per side: one at each end of the cylinder (double-acting, of course), and one from the steam chest.

 

Hello BR(W), all,

 

looking at the photos that have been posted the middle pipe (at the base of the cylinder) is from the steam chest.

 

I'm not sure about the double acting part on the drain taps. I have always assumed that they were single acting, or just an on off tap. ie. That they would let the water and steam out but not atmospheric air in due to the steam in the cylinders. Why would you want the cylinders to admit air. When the loco was running with no steam on (bad practise on non- mechanical lubricated locos) the snifting (ant- vacuum) valve took care of this. Most of the time when a steam loco was running (coasting) the cut-off would be very short and the regulator just cracked open (about 1/8 - 1/4 of the first valve), this helped to keep the cylinders warm it also acted as a buffering force when the piston was coming to the ends of its travel and to help stop condensation forming when stood still.

 

OzzyO.

Edited by ozzyo
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Actually, if you look closely at the close-up photos, in the upper one, the valve chest drain is the lowest one, as per the pipe and rod drawing. However, as Ozzo says, in the lower one it is the middle pipe, so perhaps either arrangement will do?

Not sure how to draw on your photo/sketch, Penguin, but the valve chest pie should have the vertical leg more-or-less directly behind the rear cylinder drain pipe (you've drawn it too far back). The remainder of the pipe run is visible in the photos.

By the way, I can highly recommend the Wild Swan LMS loco profile series of books as they contain loads of photos and various GA, pipe & rod and other useful drawings. That's where I'm getting the Crab piping information from (Profile No. 2 - The Horwich Moguls).

 

Dave.

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Actually, if you look closely at the close-up photos, in the upper one, the valve chest drain is the lowest one, as per the pipe and rod drawing. However, as Ozzo says, in the lower one it is the middle pipe, so perhaps either arrangement will do?

 

Hello Dave, all,

 

when I said the middle pipe I was referring to the base of the cylinder, not the pipe ends.

 

Sorry for any confusion. Original post now edited.

 

OzzyO.

Edited by ozzyo
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PoD, OzzyO, all.

Sorry, the 'double-acting' ("three drain cocks per side: one at each end of the cylinder (double-acting, of course)") was referring to the cylinder in order to explain why this has two drain cocks: one at each end of the swept volume because each piston stroke has, in turn, steam applied on alternate sides of the piston head, meaning that condensate could collect in both clearance volumes of the cylinder.

 

As for the pipe runs, I think Rail-Online's excellent photos explain them pretty well. Just one point, though, it seems that in their latter years, 'Crabs' often had the three pipes cut back to a point just in front of the cylinders. And photos of 42727 on an SLS special in March 1966 show full length pipes on the left hand side, and cut back ones on the right hand side!
 

Cheers,

 

BR(W).

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Hello BR(W), all,

 

I've just re-read your post and your reply above then the penny dropped, you were talking about the cylinders, I was thinking about the drain taps, being double acting. This can be one of the problems with a web site, if it's not wrote just so it can be taken to mean something different.

At the end of the day we have all helped Mr. PoD to get his loco a bit better.

 

OzzyO. 

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Out of interest, have you considered having a go at correcting the old Lima 09 bodyshell? I ended up with one last week, and thought it would be fun to saw it up and see if some of those weird proportions could be rectified....

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I did...then Bachmann brought their's out...

 

Out of interest, have you considered having a go at correcting the old Lima 09 bodyshell? I ended up with one last week, and thought it would be fun to saw it up and see if some of those weird proportions could be rectified....

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