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Adventures in O gauge - LNER J50 "Junkshop Dog"


Boris
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Right, time for a progress report seeing as I have been putting off transfers and touching up paintwork for far too long, we now have blue solebars, a black underframe and most of the other colours picked out. Finally finished applying transfers tonight, and once I get back from holiday I'm going to fire up the airbrush and do some weathering, you can't really have a bright blue shiny one of these!

 

More, better photos to follow, I've just given up fighting with the camera at this time in the proceedings!

 

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  • 1 month later...

Ok, whilst waiting for more airbrush propellant to arrive for weathering the GUV I have decided to re-open the PRMRP class 20 that has been festering on the shelf (and occasionally off it) for a couple of years. So far we have a chassis that runs and a thing that looks like an Anne Summers reject pretending to be a body. I have managed to poke and prod the body into resembling a class 20, but I am resigned to the fact that some parts of it steadfastly refuse to go together correctly and will require a certain amount of car body filler. Some good stuff here like measuring from the cab centreline to the bottom of the cabside, one side is longer than the other, not modelling error, there really is more material on one side than the other. I think I will be taking the plunge and tack soldering the body to the frames tomorrow so I can see where exactly I am at.

 

 

 

Photos to follow.

Edited by Boris
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Okay, the loco actually looks loco shaped now, but I have had to cut the cab floor away to allow access to the cab for glazing and interior fitting once some painting has been done, The cab just about sits correctly, although the bonnet does solder up nicely to the running plate.

 

Big problems encountered with the nose end though, being totally unable to make the thing fit without an enormous gap somewhere, the problem has been tracked down to a large differance between the surface area of the lip on the nose and the inside length of the bonnet. I have fitted it as best I can and am now waiting on delivery of some filler to disguise the holes.

 

The camera can't disguise the fact that the loco looks naff. Holes aplenty, although I could clean some solder away whilst waiting for the filler to arrive.

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Hello Boris,

 

the top of that bonnet looks very curvy.

 

OzzyO.

 

Yes, the joys of incorrectly pre-rolled bodyshells. Looking at photos there should be a regular gentle curve to the bonnet top, running into a sharper one about a foot to 18 inches above the handrail.

 

Since the photo was taken the bonnet top has been altered down using a method that would probably make most finescale modellers cringe but works well on car doors! Rather than attempting to re-roll the bodyshell it was easier to use this method as the nose also gives a template to work to, it now runs parallel to the nose top rather than the big hole thats there in the photo.

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Hello Boris,

 

I thought that it looked like a pre-rolled one.

 

OzzyO.

 

You were correct, unfortunately I think someone has had a bit of a brain fart and rolled in a nice continuous arc right accross the top of the loco whereas there are 3 distinct arcs on many loco roofs. Thankfully on a 20 its a simple fix, another loco would probably be a pig of a job. I must admit to now not being a fan of one piece pre-rolled bodies and this will be a major governing factor in future kit purchases.

Edited by Boris
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  • 2 weeks later...

Ok, there has been a little bit more progress since my last post, but things like work and real life keep getting in the way. As mentioned earlier the bonnet is now a bit closer to the correct shape and all the big holes have been filled up. I have used some car body filler I got from amazon.co.uk of all places (Isopon P38) and, whilst smelling rather potent, does get the job done in a most satisfying manner. It sticks to most things, except fingers, and is extremely easy to sand/file to shape.

 

Other than that I have replaced the proposed grill & fan with something from MMP and am happier with the results than using the supplied parts, I am just waiting for a Steve Beattie cab interior to arrive so I can start trial fitting etc. In the meanwhile it would appear that I have mislaid the cab doors (!) so will have to make two new ones, mind you, this is quite easy being 2 piece of brass with a handle and handrails on!

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  • 2 weeks later...

OK, my MMP 08 kit arrived the other day, and I am having a change for a while. Progress on the PRMRP 20 has been very slow, waiting for some stuff I ordered 3 weeks ago that hasn't yet surfaced. Not sure what the forum rules are on naming this person, so I won't. The 20 is now occupying the dust free space on the shelf where it came from until I feel the urge to do some more to it.

 

The 08 kit if very nicely presented, although the first thing I suggest you do is to grab a stapler and fasten the words part into one bundle and the diagrams into another, prototype photos form a third. There are that many pages that a freak gust of wind or an accidental cat invasion could result in many hours spent putting everything back in order, I found this out the hard way with the GUV. Also this kit is this finely detailed you really don't want to lose any pages.

 

There are a nice number of brass frets, one with nickel silver detailing parts, and some really nice laser printed dials for the cab.

 

The other nice feature is the one piece moulded resin bonnet top, this saves a lot of potential heartache with rolling bars

 

I was going to put up a few photos, but the ones http://www.7mmlocomotives.co.uk/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=363 here show everything up as nicely as I could want, there is even a nice cast shunting pole to place in the clip on the shunters step!

 

Work will probably start on Sunday.

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Folding up of the main running plate has now been completed, this needs to be square and neatly done because almost everything attaches to it one way or another. I have also added the front shunting steps, complete with nickel silver bottom step and tread. So far everything is fairly easy, although you do have to be quite careful because there are a lot of folds to do with brackets for various bits of brake equipment sitting behind the buffer beams.

 

Some of these give very small areas which could be inaccessible once the main bits of folding are done so a good coat of looking at is required before you start. In the same vein, getting flux out of these nooks and crannies would also be nigh on impossible so regular cleaning is required. Enjoyed this bit even so.

 

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Quick update, I got a bit of advice today, rather than following the instructions religiously, add the loco side frames before any further detail goes on the loco running plate Re-reading the instructions and looking at the diagrams, I can see the sense in this. The next step I am at is to add a quantity of air tanks and pipework to the underside of the loco, this would make fitting the side frames awkward without causing damage, so, sure enough the side frames are now in place, tacked, but they are in place.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Not worked on this for a while because of work and other distractions, but I have now assembled both sets of cab steps, supplied as one piece, the folding requires a little bit of thought before you commit, but it all fits together nicely, nickel silver treads are then added to each step, these are fiddly but worth it. Returning to the front for a while I am now at point of fitting out the front buffer beam. This is started with a large overlay, complemented by several smaller ones, lamp irons are added and then so are pipes. I'm about at this stage now, fitting pipes etc as time permits. I would also strongly suggest that you clean as you go, otherwise you will have a bit of a job getting all the green stuff off the detail parts later.

 

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The square on the centre lamp iron is an etching supplied to model the target numbers given to these locos in large dock/yard complexes - it may or may not stay, I just did it for fun!

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Hi Boris,

 

Your MMP 08 looks like it is coming together well. I keep meaning to buy one myself as I have seen quite a few made up and they always look good. With regards keeping the brass clean whilst working, I made the same mistake with my 56 build. Is your 08 going to be in BR Blue?

 

Cheers

 

Simon

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Is your 08 going to be in BR Blue?

Thanks for your interest, I'm plodding on with it as time allows, but its a good kit to build. So far only a couple of things that require a coat of thinking about rather than being downright awkward too!

 

I reckon so, any other colour won't fit in with the rest of my stock. What fascinates me is the number of livery variations, even just of BR blue. Yellow bufferbeams are common, but I have found red ones, with a red solebar (or the faring where the solebar would be) linking them, rail blue and a couple in black (black not dirt). Even a couple with yellow buffer beams and red buffer shanks, there is the remote possibility that a couple of these are off a 9F, apparently they do share the same buffers.

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I've seen 08's with oval buffers, and even remember one at Frodingham having an Oleo set at one end, but they were removed before I got a pic.

Crikey, I'd forgotten about that one, I have a photo somewhere in the depths of the attic of that, didn't twig on until the film had been developed, looking back I think the Oleos were the ones with the quite large buffer faces on them. I've always wondered if some of the oval buffers are ex steam loco as they seem to share common fittings?

 

Mind you, no wonder 08 buffers had a shorter than average shelf life, I remember one 08 in Newcastle when there used to be a pilot in the early 90s and the drivers seemed to delight in flying into the bays at speed (l/e) and jamming the brakes on at the last moment, especially one particularly icy day!

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In the late 70's Oleo's were very rare on pilots. I only have one picture showing 08710 at Aberdeen so fitted. I also have a picture of 08799 with ovals at the cab end only. I also have a picture of 08752 in Dutch livery with ovals at both ends. Today Oleo's are quite common I think.

 

By the way your works looking good but just one thing to check out. Should the little tank behind the front steps be on top of the etched bracket so it shows from the side above the step?

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By the way your works looking good but just one thing to check out. Should the little tank behind the front steps be on top of the etched bracket so it shows from the side above the step?

Thanks for spotting that, I suppose I had to do something daft sooner or later, they are now on the top side of the bracket. I would imagine that Oleos are easier to acquire these days than spares for what are effectively steam age buffers. I'm getting a bit tempted to put some different buffers on this now, oval buffers on one end seems quite appealing, failing that MMP do some fantastic Oleo castings, choices choices!

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Update time again. The rear buffer beam has been fitted out and attention had now been turned to the underside of the loco running plate. At the nose end, this entails a pair of air tanks with associated piping and drain taps for getting moisture out the system, and what is probably the radiator drain point. Even though the loco is vacuum only; the loco brakes themselves are air worked, hence the reservoir tanks. The tanks are easy to identify, being one of the biggest castings in the kits, and the only issue with everything else was identifying some of the pipes in amongst all the castings, all in all not too much bother.

 

The cab end buffer beam was next, with an overlay and a fine flange requiring folding, vac bags added and them again the plumbing. The main loco brake cylinders are under the cab and the whole system is modelled along with the power shaft etc. We also have the fuel fill points at this end along with associated valves and fittings, its a bit of a maze to put together but well worth it.

 

Then we move onto the top of the loco. The basic bonnet is only 4 pieces, front back and 2 sides, located by means of slots and tabs, easy enough to make up, with the sides aligning with grooves in the cab bulkhead. One thing I didn't know is that 08 sides taper slightly bottom to top, its very subtle, but they do, but this is easily achieved using the slots in the bulkhead as a guide. The front is easy enough to solder on, the etch grooves are so you can easily paint your hazard stripes by hand.

 

Its had a couple of washes, but is due another one, as well as having run out of refills for my fibreglass pencil!

 

I know the bonnet top is wonky, but it is not fastened on yet, just placed for a photo op!

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Edited by Boris
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Hi Boris,

 

You are doing a fine job of your Gronk there. I like the idea of changing the buffers as this can certainly make a large difference to a loco for not a lot of work.

 

Keep up the good work!

 

Andy

Hi Andy,

 

Thanks for the encouragement, looking at the photos this morning, they make it look awful, but in the flesh I'm quite proud of it! I reckon a set of oval ones at one end and standard ones at the other would probably be worth the wind up value for the rivet counters alone!

 

Boris

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Ah..........but DO ensure it's numbered so that no-one can say that THAT particular loco never had oval buffers........

Oh I will do, complete with photographic evidence! What fascinates me is the number of detail variations accross the class, mind you, there were an awful lot of them built.

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  • Boris changed the title to Adventures in O gauge - LNER J50 "Junkshop Dog"

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