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Tim Hale

Building a Southern Region layout

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You reap as you sow, Tim, and these are coming up just fine! Lots of brill ideas here!

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IMG_0464.JPG

 

 

That was faster than I thought :D .

 

The leafy vegetable are potato plants, French beans, for these I used Mini-Natur foliage whilst the white bits is the PVA going off. The last details are some garden tools and a 50's period washing line - the latter will prove to be problematic- were Y-fronts available in the 50's?

 

 

Does anyone remember* a wonderful Buddleia (Butterfly Bush) in 4mm on the forum? I would dearly like to attempt my own version.

 

Tim

 

*I should have done a search, mea culpa. Having read the thread, it is obvious that I need to up my game because Paul's work is superb. http://www.rmweb.co....p?f=102&t=50257

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Strewth! At this rate, Tim, you can get a second crop before Autumn really bites!

 

EDIT : As for the Y-fronts, the '50s were an era of Cold War concerns over nuclear attack. As we know, Y-fronts help prevent fallout!

Edited by Oldddudders
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Ian,

 

I found this rather interesting article concerning the history of the Y-front. Halfway down is an interesting snippet about two pairs of elderly Y-fronts that recently sold on EBay for £127 and £90 respectively. A brief history of Y-fronts.

 

What did railway staff wear in the 50's, high-waisted trousers and collarless shirts seem favourite?

 

Tim

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You reap as you sow, Tim, and these are coming up just fine! Lots of brill ideas here!

Brilliant stuff Tim, I take you've included the slugs and blackfly?

Dave.

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The last details are some garden tools and a 50's period washing line - the latter will prove to be problematic- were Y-fronts available in the 50's?

Long-Johns would have to feature...

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I found this rather interesting article concerning the history of the Y-front. Halfway down is an interesting snippet about two pairs of elderly Y-fronts that recently sold on EBay for £127 and £90 respectively. A brief history of Y-fronts.

 

What did railway staff wear in the 50's, high-waisted trousers and collarless shirts seem favourite?

This accords with the regular findings of RMWeb's ebay madness thread - there is one born every minute!

 

Yes, high-waisted trousers, typically with braces, seem to be a 50's theme. Waistcoats, too, for a certain time of year, and to hold a fob-watch - still the standard issue to guards for decades to come. Shoes would be highly polished, of course - suede etc didn't really have a market among ordinary people then. Don't forget the standard heavy-duty long railway mac - essential issue for staff working in all weathers - but suitably cut to be above third rail height! I think collarless shirts were very common then - change your collar daily, not your shirt, perhaps?

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DLT wrote:

Brilliant stuff Tim, I take you've included the slugs and blackfly?

Dave.

 

 

I have just found a packet of Preiser chooks, these will

of any nasty creepy-crawlies in the garden. BTW, yes they are HO but neither are all poultry breeds the same size.

 

 

 

Tim

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A few chooks for pest control, the usual garden detritus and a broom outside the shelter for keeping it tidy

 

I think that I will call it a day. Will someone bother to whinge about the modern broom?

 

IMG_0470.JPG

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Given a short while and those chickens would devastate the veg plot. Look at any Chicken run only a few hardy weeds ever survive. The sensible practive is to allow them on the ground each autumn to clear it ( and manure it!) for the next season. We had to keep the ducks out of our veg plot not that they ate everything but those feet flatten it all and packed the ground down. Perhaps someone left the run door open and they have got out.

Lovely work.

Don

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Errr, thanks but we are happy with the chooks, they're only plastic.

 

 

 

Tim

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OK. That modern broom doesn't go with the steam era.

 

JE

 

Well its just that that Broom is ok but it never really wore that livery under BR ownership.....

 

On the other hand very good modeliing there :)

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Well its just that that Broom is ok but it never really wore that livery under BR ownership.....

Are you certain? BR's early experimenting with various shades of red on coaching stock could well have included that shade, I'm sure. Let's not be hasty here. Someone will know.

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Just for once a little bit of progress- and thanks to RMweb's on-line magazine. I have attempted to follow the guidance on improving the track, unfortunately I didn't remove the web because the track was already in place otherwise I have followed it pretty well to the letter.

 

The Plasti-Kote tends to flake but nothing that cannot be fixed and further weathering with artists (not Tamiya) acrylics has been quite successful but isn't painting the rails a chore?

 

Ballast is Woodland Scenics B75 Fine Grey because it was in stock rather than Greenscenes, which was not.

 

Anyway here is the result so far, ballasting will commence in the morning;

 

IMG_0476.jpg

 

ToodlePip

 

Tim

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Guest oldlugger

Excellent work Tim and a very nice layout in the making. Your house and garden are particularly fine.

 

Cheers

Simon

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Thank you but the house is the work of Bill Jones of this parish, credit where it is due.

 

I merely added the garden.

 

Tim

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Many everyday parts of he railway infrastructure are 'just there' and merit no second glance let alone close examination.

 

The Peco buffer stop is just such an example, after all, it is Peco and therefore is despised by those who never have a good thing to say about Peco. However this little piece of essential ironmongery demands our attention because it really is that good at a bargain price.

IMG_0483.jpg

 

 

Mindful of its slippery plastic nature, I assembled it with UHU contact adhesive, then sprayed it with Halfords plastic primer before a dilute wash with artists acrylic Cinnamon Brown. The next one will have the pegs shortened before assembly so that they are flush with the wooden beam and it still needs further paintwork BUT look at that detail, those bolts, isn't it a little beauty.

 

I think that it will do just fine, don't you?

 

Tim

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Mindful of its slippery plastic nature, I assembled it with UHU contact adhesive, then sprayed it with Halfords plastic primer before a dilute wash with artists acrylic Cinnamon Brown. The next one will have the pegs shortened before assembly so that they are flush with the wooden beam and it still needs further paintwork BUT look at that detail, those bolts, isn't it a little beauty.

 

I think that it will do just fine, don't you?

Yes, I do. ISTR Peco also do/did a timber-built stop, with fine wooden graining. As you say, these cheap and trivial bits actually add more value to a layout than their size and price would suggest. I believe others now make etchings for buffer stops, and I'm sure these have fine detail, too, but wonder whether they give the impression of solidity that is such a key feature of a device designed to stop an errant vehicle or train!

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The Peco buffer stops come up a treat, especially if you add a little bejewelled Springside lamp and cut back the pips on the buffer stop itself.

 

I did do a few with the lamp drilled out, painted white and added a red jewell fom a load I bought from an arts shop in Gus.

 

I lost the lot following a heavy duty sneeze so had to revert to Springside (again!).

Edited by BlackRat
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We've used a few of these on Tawbridge and I have used these on Orchard Road - with careful painting and weathering they come up a treat. Like you write, I have also trimmed off the pins where they come through the 'timber' face.

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Hi Richard,

 

Many thanks for your response, may I pick your brains about turnout levers and ground signals- I do envy yours.

 

Tim

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Hi Tim,

 

The ground levers are from Wizzard Models and etch brass - nice little items and certainly worthwhile having. I've also added a section of chequer plate across the ends of the sleepers to hide the end of the tie-bar. Hopefully the photo shows this a little clearer. I can't get the layout at the moment, as it is boxed away.

 

post-7854-0-50021900-1319046288.jpg

 

I don't have any ground signals, just the lattice post - again Wizzard / MSE

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