Jump to content
We are aware of the intermittent site speed issues at the moment. Please be patient and don't repeatedly click things as that compounds the issue.

curved points


Recommended Posts

i may need to incorporate curved points on my proposed layout but am somewhat put off by several posts i have read suggesting problems with "wandering" pony trucks on steamers.I am using peco streamline code 100.I did have a couple of Hornby curved points on my first layout which caused intermittant problems which seemed to occure without ryme or reason!Has anyone got the definative answer?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use 2 Peco streamline large curved points in what many people many consider the worst possible place.

They form a crossover between the 2 running tracks on a curve and also on a gradient.

 

I have never had a derailment on them.

 

Avoid Hornby and Peco Set track points like the plague.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A definitive answer is not possible, because many of the factors are unknown, most of them solely under your control. Used carefully (laid flat, no kinks in track joints running on and off the point) it is equivalent in running reliability to the small radius (24" nominal) streamline point; so if you find the latter satisfactory, the curved point will be OK.

 

There is an observation I do feel pressed to make, and it relates to the kinked track joints mentioned above. I don't know what it is about curved points on layouts, but they do seem to tempt layout builders into bodging, in a way that they would not employ when putting points in straight track. Either one or more of the plain track radii leading to the point is made under radius, or there are kinks in the joints; and the attitude I have encountered more than once is that this somehow 'doesn't count' as a defect in track laying because it is on a curve. (Rather like calories consumed at the cinema can be ignored, as they are part of the total entertainment package.)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used a Bachmann mineral wagon for testing newly laid track. It was given a hefty shove at high speed to see how it would negotiate trackwork and points and was great for finding kinks or badly laid points. The wagon lost its brake gear over a period through derailing on its high speed jaunts!! I had curved points in one of the marshalling yards and they were as trustworthy as any of the other types Peco Code 75 point.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Many thanks for the response.I think the answer to any problems with them lies in carefull track laying which i will endeavor to do,i am also not going below 26" radius on any of my curves which should also help.The referance to matching the radius going in and out (if i have understood this )would also seem very logical,has anyone got a fool proof method to achieve this?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

Although i now model in "n",I reckon the following is relevent to 00:>

 

 

I`ve used quite a few curved points on my layout code 55 ef but mostly

code 80,2 on a facing curved junction.What you have to make sure is that the

switch rail snuggles into the stock rail closely.Best way i`ve found to do this

over the years is to take a farish bogie coach & push it slowly with a bit of

downward pressure from your finger against the outside curve in a facing

direction.If the wheels click as they move onto the blade,use a swiss file &

file the taper on the blade until everything runs smoothly.This method does take

patience but it does work,I run an early Dapol 9f over the junction with no

derailing.

 

 

 

 

This,i posted on the Yahoo N groups some time ago & this is the system iv`e used.

Ray.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The eye is still the best tool in my view...:)

 

Especially combined with a small mirror on the track as C J Freezer used to suggest so you can see all the doglegs and twists clearly.

 

For the flow string can be used if you know the radii - measure back from the end of the point stick in a pin, check you got it about right and repeat on the same alignment for the other radius.

 

I'd be wary about putting a curved point into an S curve but I've not had any problems in N with conventional gentle curves flowing into points. The point does need to be flat and properly laid though, if it is twisted (eg pinned down too hard) then the switch rails will rise up above the main rails and you'll have problems. In fact I've had more problems with Kato #4 straight pointwork.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have a number of curved Peco large radius insulfrog points in my hidden sidings. No problems now but some adjustments were necessary due to my poor track laying. Incoming radius must match well with the point radius and as said several times they must be level.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

since you can have a large radius coming off a tighter curve as well as the more normal tight curve coming off a larger one there is obviously some leeway on matching the radius. The essential is that both radii have the same tangent at the join otherwise there is a kink. As Etched Pixels says a small mirror is handy lets you look at angles you head cant reach.

Don

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to have two sets of curved peco points on my older/first layout. I had so many problems with derailments that I removed them & reworked the layout so that I wouldn't need them. But then, this was my first layout and there were probably other problems in it causing the derailments.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

just as a matter of interest since i posted on this subject,i have incorporated several peco streamline code 100 curved points into my layout so far.I have noted all the great advice from people on here and in particular giving great attention to smooth entrances and exits from the points.All my stock works fine both ways so i am a happy chappy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

I have 3 crossovers using Peco code 75 as well as a few single ones and all run reliably without problems, when I laid them I was careful to lay them so they sat correctly and then laid track to them rather than make them fit a situation.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The outer curve radius on the streamline curved point is a very large radius (I think in the order of 50" - 60"?) which is not far off straight as far as all the layouts I have experience of. Unless you are inserting it into a large radius curve of that order you will need to carefully consider the transition curves approaching it to reduce the angular momentum of the approaching train.

 

Unlike with set track curved points it is not possible to create a double track curved crossover with streamline because of the big difference in radius between the inner and outer curve (I think the inner radius is 30") - the only way I have done this is to use a curved point on the inner track and a straight point on the outer track at the transition from the curve, and then only on a trailing crossover.

 

Most of the time I have found when trying to save space the streamline curved points do not actually save anything because of the very large outer radius which tends to hinder things.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold

Unlike with set track curved points it is not possible to create a double track curved crossover with streamline because of the big difference in radius between the inner and outer curve (I think the inner radius is 30") - the only way I have done this is to use a curved point on the inner track and a straight point on the outer track at the transition from the curve, and then only on a trailing crossover.

 

 

I know what you mean, luckily for me they fitted the track plan I had

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...