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Les Green

Lime Street Station

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I hope it has the prototypical twist! JLR thanks to the bomb damage

 

That looks really good!

 

Ian

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The bomb damage is on the North side. Any twists on the South side are due to my rubbish soldering techniques.

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Les

 

Thanks for keeping us up to date with the superb modelling you are doing, I am realy enjoying following the thread. With both Ron Heggs and yourself posting such outstanding work I do look forward to putting on the computer after work and catch up with your latest postings.

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Superb Les,

 

how do you plan to paint and add the glazing?

 

is the framing for the glazing which is to be added to the top of those girders to be done as a large etch or individually?

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The glazing will be in many individual parts. Possibly etches or laser cut plastic. Each section of glazing rests on the top of one girder and the bottom of the adjacent girder. The complete glazing will only be done on the outer four panels. The next three panels will be left open. The centre four sections will be missing altogether. I have not designed the glazing yet. It should not be a problem, just a tedious job! The painting of the roof section as modelled is easy enough, painting the glazing will be thought about at a later stage. You offering?

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If you are modelling Lime Street just after WW2, would the roof have been glazed? I am just wondering because other main line termini had the glazing removed at the start of the war. I haven't a clue how quickly everything would have been put back though. I am sure you know better than me, but I am curious!

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How's the Hotel Fire escape going Les?

 

Pete

 

At the back of the queue at the moment. Need to finish the roof then finish the hotel structural design first.

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If you are modelling Lime Street just after WW2, would the roof have been glazed? I am just wondering because other main line termini had the glazing removed at the start of the war. I haven't a clue how quickly everything would have been put back though. I am sure you know better than me, but I am curious!

 

Good point, and I don't know the answer yet. I know the end screen at the concourse end was always glazed and the front screen was not glazed in later years if it ever was glazed at all. Maybe the glazing was removed during the war from the front screen. More research needed.

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The wiring diagram must be a work of art ,it looks so neat and tidy how long did it take to get it all done?

 

As I commented previously to this; I am unable to answer the question myself.

 

However, John and Geoff have disussed my response and provided the following comments, which once again shows the way that the whole team on the Lime Street project work - aiming for the best, "cos we can".

 

John and Geoff write:-

 

" Regarding the wiring and documentation. This is an area that gets little or no coverage in the model press. As Steve rightly says, Geoff and I are both ex. BT, indeed we go back to the days of the GPO Engineering department.

 

Looking at the underside of any of the baseboards, in most cases, neither of us would have a clue what any of the wires were for. But using the documentation, we are able to work out what wire is for what, and then resolve any problems.(With a bit of luck and a following wind!)

 

Geoff and I have our own areas of responsibility. I did all the baseboard wiring, including power feeds, point wiring, CCTV wiring etc. Geoff did all the clever stuff in the two boxes of electronics (known as the X-box, and the Y-box). Also Geoff built, and wired the control panels.

 

For the baseboards, there are three full ring binders, dealing with the traction feeds, point wiring, and indeed every type of circuit on that baseboard.

Every inter-baseboard plug and socket is identified and numbered, giving details of what colour of wire, type of circuit, and where the wire goes to for every pin. There are some 2500 connections made every time the layout is set up.

 

For Geoff’s part, he has some 20 plus folders giving details of every electronic circuit he has made for the layout, these also show (sometimes illustrated with captioned photographs) printed circuit board layouts, and all components used etc. we both have all this information backed up on three computers along with all the software for the various processors used.

 

I hope the above will give food for thought, whilst what we have done may seem “over the top”, remember this is a very complex layout with a high degree of sophistication, anything less would have been a recipe for disaster. "

 

This subject could almost be worth a Topic in its own right?

 

Steve.

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Last Monday, when Les was doing all the work on the first two roof sections, John & I were installing the remaining semaphore signals on Platforms 6 to 11.

These are not yet commissioned, as the "Node", Control Board etc have to be installed first.

This work is not scheduled to be done until we return from Utrecht early in November.

 

The result so far looks like this:

 

post-3984-0-95543600-1317674005_thumb.jpg

 

This shows all the signals:

From the extreme left you can see Platform 1, a bracket with two dolls and three arms.

Next is the Gantry spanning Platforms 2, 3, 4 & 5. Each has two dolls and three arms.

Each Platform has access to the Slow and Fast lines, hence two starters.

The small arm, below each Fast Starter allows movements within station limits.

This is the extent to which the signals are currently operational.

 

Platforms 6, 7 and 8 each have an old LNWR lower quadrant rignal with just a starter and subsidiary arm.

These platforms can only reach the Fast line up the cutting, crossing to the Slow line if necessary where that line emerges from the tunnel.

 

Platforms 9 and 10 have the bracket with two dolls.

The left had doll for Platform 9, has a Starter for the Fast line and a subsidiary, as for Platforms 6, 7 & 8.

These are LMS pattern upper quadrants but mounted on ex-LNWR main post and bracketwork.

Platform 10 has the same two arms as Platform 9, plus a second lower subsidiary arm which permits engines access to the Turntable.

 

Platform 11 has the same signal arrangement as Platform 10, but on a small single doll bracket, needed for sighting purposes.

 

Through the space below the right hand bridge, you may just see the back of the ground signal with two arms.

This allows engines to leave the Turnatble road and access Platforms 11 or 10.

 

This is a view of this ground signal from the Turntable side:

 

post-3984-0-32688100-1317675019_thumb.jpg

 

You may notice that some lines aren't yet signalled.

These are the various sidings between the platform raods, and the end loading bays, in addition to the lines beyond Platform 1.

All the other ground signals for shunting movements into the various platforms are also absent.

It is unlikely that these ground signals will be operational, as they will largely be "invisible" to most viewers.

 

Steve.

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It is unlikely that these ground signals will be operational, as they will largely be "invisible" to most viewers.

 

Steve.

 

Now, that is a real lame excuse. What happened to our motto of 'cos we can'!

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Now, that is a real lame excuse. What happened to our motto of 'cos we can'!

 

 

Oh! Go on then. I'm up for it.

 

If John and Geoff can manage the necessary software (route setting etc) and the Network Node and Servo controllers.

I just hope there's room for all the "under board" items.

There's at least twenty times the volume of a ground signal underneath the boards to make it work!

 

Steve.

Edited by SteveAtBax

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WOW...

Dogs nadgers that lot gents :yes:

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Been following this for a while now, some really inspirational modelling - thanks for keeping us all informed of progress! I've just noticed the little check rails you have put in opposite rails which cross a baseboard joint at a shallow angle (Platform 10 road in your photo above) - this is an excellent and very practical idea, yet it doesn't distract from the model's realism. In fact, if the real railway had to cross baseboard joints, we would probably use the same technique!

 

It will be wonderful to see this layout operating to a 'rush hour' timetable with trains going back and forth and signals going up and down. Keep up the good work.

 

Cheers,

 

Will

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I dont think its a baseboard join Will, but there is a cut in the left hand rail I think its to help it over that.

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Coming into Lime Street last week to represent a client, I remembered someone was modelling the full whack in EM.

 

How many people out there are now going to go EM on the strength of having seen this layout? Quite a few, I would imagine.

 

....unlikely that these ground signals will be operational, as they will largely be "invisible" to most viewers.

 

Which is a hell of a waste, given that you put in so much effort building them to be fully-operational......

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I dont think its a baseboard join Will, but there is a cut in the left hand rail I think its to help it over that.

Hi Michael,

 

I've checked the original photo on my PC and it is a baseboard joint.

You can just see the join passes through the rail mentioned, then the crossover and finally the platform surface, just before the end of the wall.

 

Steve.

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I must say how much I'm enjoying following progress with this marvellous project. It's one of those inspirational mega-layouts which seem to be under way these days - Ron Heggs Manchester Central and Jim Smith Wright's Birmingham New Street on RMweb and Roy Jackson's Retford (not on here) are other examples that come readily to mind. What impresses most about all these is not just the scale and ambition of the undertaking, but the incredible attention to detail and superb standard of modelling being achieved. Perhaps it's no coincidence, they're all models of real places?

I'm particularly enjoying seeing the signals - for reasons that Steve will appreciate! (Those miniature semaphores will be more visible on Delph.....!)

 

One thing which does strike me from the station photos is how close to the platform edge the central roof support columns appear to be and I wonder if this is correct or they not yet in their final position?

 

Looking forward to further installments with eager anticipation.

 

Cheers,

 

Dave.

Edited by Dave Holt

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Dave,

 

The pillars are now all fixed in place.

What you are looking at is one of the (un-signalled) sidings.

 

Steve.

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