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Les Green

Lime Street Station

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Another solution may be to try fitting a baffle plate near the top of the chimney, to disrupt the airflow.

 

 

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100% vegetable glycerine vape liquid (available without any nicotine) will produce a denser "smoke" but this stuff does tend to shorten the life of the heating element.  Chimneys tended to produce a steady flow of smoke, it's getting it visible and maybe going off at an angle (this is Liverpool, there is wind) that may help it to be convincing.

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The chimney build is excellent, it will be interesting to see how the smoke effect works out.

 

I bought a smoke unit and oil to fit somewhere near the engine shed and then never used it as I was worried that the residue might mess up the locos and track

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Saw a chimney using steam generated from an old kettle yesterday. Water boiled to steam. Not as good as black, billowing smoke but environmentally friendly.

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Steve

 

Have you considered using dry ice as used with disco lighting and by photographers - no oily residue.

 

Tony

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1 hour ago, Tony Teague said:

Steve

 

Have you considered using dry ice as used with disco lighting and by photographers - no oily residue.

 

Tony

 

Thanks Tony.

 

In a word, "no".

 

Not sure whats involved in obtaining, storing, transporting and using it.

 

Steve.

 

 

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On 26/09/2019 at 09:21, LMS2968 said:

Sorry, this is the best I can do: B&W doesn't move us on very much.

 

https://servimg.com/view/16142381/1399

 

Nipping back to this discussion as I'm just catching up.

 

Prior to ca 1980 the down home signals all showed green to the stops, I can clearly remember (frequently) hanging out of the window of a down train and seeing greens all the way down the cutting, I used to do this as the Merseyrail service was half hourly and I was always hoping for a clear run so I could get down the subway and catch the train. Around 1980 the last signal was changed to only show yellow and the platform routing was moved back to the down home 2 signals, the down home 3 signals - show on the plan above - were removed.

 

I suspect the LMS signal also showed green but can't be 100%

Edited by beast66606
Added Merseyrail bit
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On 26/09/2019 at 23:10, Steve Hewitt said:

 

I have heard a story about its use following electrification:

 

If an electric loco sustained damage to its windscreen on a trip to Euston, it would not be repaired there as it should have been, but it was sent back to Liverpool, with the damage at the trailing end.

To return the favour, the loco was turned at Lime Street and sent back to Euston, who not having any turntable were then obliged to undertake the repair.

 

Fact or fable?????

 

Steve.

 

 

The turntable was still used into the later 1970s, as a siding - somewhere I have a photo ( one  of mine) of an electric loco on it.

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12 hours ago, Tony Teague said:

Steve

 

Have you considered using dry ice as used with disco lighting and by photographers - no oily residue.

 

Tony

 

10 hours ago, Steve Hewitt said:

 

Thanks Tony.

 

In a word, "no".

 

Not sure whats involved in obtaining, storing, transporting and using it.

 

Steve.

 

 

I saw a layout try that a while ago. All they got was a thick fog at track level as the mist they generated was heavier than air. As it cleared the turntable pit took on the appearance of a frozen pond on a January morning.

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1 hour ago, TheSignalEngineer said:

 

I saw a layout try that a while ago. All they got was a thick fog at track level as the mist they generated was heavier than air. As it cleared the turntable pit took on the appearance of a frozen pond on a January morning.

 

Hmmm, I think you are probably right!

Perhaps have a look at this alternative:

 

 

Tony

 

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11 hours ago, Steve Hewitt said:

 

Thanks Tony.

 

In a word, "no".

 

Not sure whats involved in obtaining, storing, transporting and using it.

 

Steve.

 

 

Trust me, having used it professionally,  the hassles of buying, storing and moving it are definitely not worth it.

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I hate to be the only pickled onion in the fruit salad, but I have to ask if this boiler house and chimney existed in real life? There was certainly a chimney, but photos and a drawing show it to be inside Cope's complex and mostly hidden behind other buildings. Or is this a little artistic licence?

 

copes210.jpg


untit238.jpg

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Smoke units:  I find scenery contamination happens mostly when the unit "pops" due to being over-filled, ejecting a small amount of distillate.   

 

My approach to my 16mm NG exhibit railway worker's cottage was to use the ubiquitous Seuthe unit, working at 15v AC draughted by a silent PC fan in a partially enclosed box right at the very base of the chimney stack (as distinct from installing the unit in the pot).  The smoke exits up an approx 5 inch long tube within the chimney to the pot.   The theory being that at least some of the distillate condensing on its way up the tube has a chance to drip back down to the base rather than being ejected from the top.     I use a syringe with a 5 inch brass tube needle extension to make sure each refill goes right into the Seuthe unit.    I operate out at the front of the layout (radio control) and always like to have some audience participation.    The Seuthe unit is not left generating smoke all the time, although the PC fan does run constantly.   Instead, there is a momentary button on the front on the layout that visitors can press to apply the 15v AC to the unit.   That way, you are only producing smoke for visitors who want to see it.   5 secs press of the button ejects an impressive smoke display draughted though the chimney pot as if the cottage fire has just been lit  (...by the pixies.....well the kids love  it anyway.)

 

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Meant also to mention... and with apologies if already noted in this thread... when considering alternative smoke generating solutions there might be need to consider increased likelihood of there being asthmatics in your audience.

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6 minutes ago, wcrpaul said:

Meant also to mention... and with apologies if already noted in this thread... when considering alternative smoke generating solutions there might be need to consider increased likelihood of there being asthmatics in your audience.

Or setting off the venue fire alarms:heat:

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As a retired employee of a industrial gas company I know that sourcing solid CO2 would be difficult as the industry is not at all keen on supplying private individuals following some wholly inappropriate uses. 
Storage and use probably make more trouble than its worth anyway.

 

David

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