Jump to content

Ron Heggs

Homemade Guillotine

Recommended Posts

To increase productivity and ensure accuracy in the structural modelling I am presently undertaking, there is a need for a plastic strip cutter which will produce hundreds of identical length pieces without having to measure or check each one individually before and/or after cutting

 

It is specifically limited to plastic strip with a thickness of 20thou or less, a width of upto 10mm, and a final cut length of no more than 100mm (see ** below)

 

Cutting 11 pieces 8.75mm in length from a plastic strip 20thou thick, 5mm wide and 300mm long, gave the following results -

 

8.74mm x 3 pieces

8.75mm x 4 pieces

8.76mm x 4 pieces

 

plus waste

 

This is well within my target accuracy for construction purposes of ± 10thou (0.25mm)

40_190953_450000000.jpg

 

40_190954_030000000.jpg

 

The guillotine uses 2 pieces of 20mm x 30mm aluminium angle 150mm long fixed to a wooden base 20mm x 58mm x 300mm

 

A 9mm Stanley Snap-off blade is pivoted between two 20mm x 30mm x 35mm angle pieces, with two pieces of steel strip 1.5mm x 10mm x 120mm clamping the blade and used as the handle. The angle pieces holding the blade are fitted into a slot in the wooden base

 

**(additional pieces of 20mm x 30mm x 35mm angle have been produced to allow use of 18mm blades for thicker and/or wider plastic strip)

 

Another piece of angle is slotted for use as an adjustable stop

 

.... seempullz !!

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice tool that, I will have to remember the idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very neat Ron, it must help you a lot with the amount of plastic you are using!

 

Hi, Ralph

 

Keeping well ?

 

I just had to find a solution for all the construction still ahead, i.e. remainder of Cornbrook Viaduct Bridge #2, and the 1894 Castlefield Viaduct Bridge, which is approx. 4.5m long

 

A similar tool, but bulkier was £26 + p&p to Spain, not an economic solution

 

Cheers

 

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As with all tools there comes a time when it becomes necessary through use that improvements have to be made

 

The excessive (normal for me) use that the guillotine is getting has shown that the blade is cutting deep into the wooden base, causing the plastic strip to bend into the trough before it is cut and producing deformed cut ends

 

The solution is to embed a strip of aluminium into the base as an anvil, the surface of the anvil flush with the top of the base. The anvil is fixed with epoxy

 

40_110950_290000000.jpg

 

The anvil is trapped under the guide bars and flush with the top of the base, and thus parallel to the blade edge when it is fully home

 

40_110950_290000001.jpg

 

So it is now back to full steam ahead

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the request of a number of members, the following drawing and parts list provides the information necessary to build your own guillotine -

 

post-10633-0-72909000-1315503172_thumb.png

 

Parts list -

 

#1 - 20mm x 56mm x 301mm Wood - Planed smooth all round

 

#2 - 30mm x 20mm x 1.5mm Aluminium Angle - 150mm

 

#3 - 30mm x 20mm x 1.5mm Aluminium Angle - 150mm

 

#4 - 30mm x 20mm x 1.5mm Aluminium Angle - 150mm with 130mm x 3mm slot

 

#5 - 30mm x 20mm x 1.5mm Aluminium Angle - 40mm

 

#6 - 30mm x 20mm x 1.5mm Aluminium Angle - 40mm

 

#7 - 10mm x 1.5mm x 35mm Aluminium Strip

 

#8 - 10mm x 1.5mm x 120mm Steel Strip

 

#9 - 10mm x 1.5mm x 120mm Steel Strip

 

9mm Stanley Snap-off Blade - Full length

 

M3 x 10mm Pan Head Machine screws and nuts - 3 off (pivot for blade through #5 & #6, and clamping blade to handle #8 & #9)

 

3mm x 15mm Countersunk Head Wood Screws - Chipboard type - 12 off (fixing Aluminium angle parts #2 - #6 to wood base)

 

3mm x 15mm Pan Head Wood Screws - Chipboard type - 2 off (clamping screws for adjustable backstop)

 

 

Assembly details can be viewed in the previous posts

 

Any questions - please ask

Edited by Ron Heggs
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ron

 

That's very nice, I just (!) use a NWSL Chopper II for cutting plastic and wood strip - did you consider one of those or do comparisons? Your design certainly seems better suited to cutting longer pieces consistently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10800, on 08 September 2011 - 19:59 , said:

 

 

Hi Ron

 

That's very nice, I just (!) use a NWSL Chopper II for cutting plastic and wood strip - did you consider one of those or do comparisons? Your design certainly seems better suited to cutting longer pieces consistently.

 

Hi Rod,

 

Yes, I looked closely at the Chopper, but at £26 + p&p to Spain, a homemade one was much cheaper and could be custom made to suit my own requirements - literally cutting thousands of identical strips in varying dimensions for my bridges. viaducts and train shed structures

 

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, thanks Ron - now I know what the £26 alternative was!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice piece of workmanship.

 

Thanks Kevin for your interest and comment

 

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.