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Eastwood Town - A tribute to Gordon's modelling.


gordon s
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1 hour ago, gordon s said:

Having read TW's notes I will solder the chassis with 145 degree solder. I feel comfortable soldering and have some low melting point solder and a temperature controlled iron so tempted to solder the body as well, rather than use epoxy. I'm always fearful of epoxy spilling out and suspect it could be a problem cleaning it off, but I'm all ears to those who have built kits before.

 

Of course I may well just put it back in the box for another day and tackle the slip instead......:D

 

Gordon

 

I like using low melt solder, 75 degrees in my case as if  you go wrong just pop it into steam from a kettle and the joint comes apart.

 

Several wise folk on here advised me to set the iron to 300 degrees when using low melt, works a treat. If you have any 180 solder for the chassis frames, then use 135 for all the detail parts. But I just use an old reel of 1mm solder wire might be 60/40, but now have 145 & 221 to try 

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Daft question, but any simple way to remove small parts from the etched sheet? The gaps are to narrow to use my smallest side cutters and I certainly don't want to distort the small parts before I start. Will a thin slitting disc do it or am I likely to damage things.

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I use a Swann-Morton thin bladed knife, Gordon. Hopefully the part will be attached in two places so you can hold the part down with a finger while cutting through the final tag or else it will fly off, never to be seen again.

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Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, gordon s said:

Daft question, but any simple way to remove small parts from the etched sheet? The gaps are to narrow to use my smallest side cutters and I certainly don't want to distort the small parts before I start. Will a thin slitting disc do it or am I likely to damage things.

 

Hi Gordon,

 

3mm chisel:

 

https://www.axminstertools.com/axminster-rider-bevel-edge-chisel-hornbeam-handle-3mm-103732

 

Use a flat bit of scrap hardwood to support the fret.

 

Martin.

Edited by martin_wynne
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Thanks Jonathan. The problem is some of the parts are held into the sheet in four places so there is no movement on the part at all. The gaps are very small and the thin sheet is too thin to use a razor saw. I'm not familiar with the Swan Morton knife so off to take a look. I know their scalpels well as I use them all the time.

 

I get the impression that any pressure on the sheet will distort the part.

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45 minutes ago, gordon s said:

 

 

I get the impression that any pressure on the sheet will distort the part.

It will, if you can't dismember the fret as you go try using a cutting disc at an angle from the back - if the tags are on this side as they usually are. Don't forget that you only want the parts, the rest of the fret is just scrap and can be chopped up as you go - most methods seem to be bent on preserving the fret as a piece of "brass lace" when the job is finished.

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2 hours ago, gordon s said:

Thanks Jonathan. The problem is some of the parts are held into the sheet in four places so there is no movement on the part at all. The gaps are very small and the thin sheet is too thin to use a razor saw. I'm not familiar with the Swan Morton knife so off to take a look. I know their scalpels well as I use them all the time.

 

I get the impression that any pressure on the sheet will distort the part.

I use a sharp swann norton blade, with the etch sheet on a firm surface ( a piece of kitchen counter top in my case) I've been known to use a sharp Stanley knife sometimes if it is close at hand.

Edited by Denbridge
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A  new  Stanley knife blade can be used but I use the same method as Mike Edge does.. slitting disc in my mini drill.

 

Baz

 

 

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On 02/03/2021 at 13:35, gordon s said:

Daft question, but any simple way to remove small parts from the etched sheet? The gaps are to narrow to use my smallest side cutters and I certainly don't want to distort the small parts before I start. Will a thin slitting disc do it or am I likely to damage things.

Gordon

I can recommend these scissors which I have used to remove small detail parts from etches without any distortion. They can also be used to remove most of the remaining part of the tab before finishing with file and sanding stick. The curved shape at the end enables good access to cramped spaces. If the parts are heavier (heavier gauge fret) I will revert to the chisel and an acrylic backing board.

https://www.wonderlandmodels.com/products/tamiya-modelling-scissors-for-photo-etch/

 

image.png.d4f3593044ffeae2c7393ac23cfad128.png

To prove the point, I'm currently working on Ian MacDonald kit as below. All parts removed and trimmed with the above

DSC05609.JPG.38369629cdefd68ce2bb892562b26f19.JPG

 

Hope this helps

Dave

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Posted (edited)

Afternoon all....

 

Another Monday and another bin day. The weeks just seem to fly by, but still enjoying a variety of tasks (well some) around ET and its development. As highlighted last Monday, I had a temporary diversion into the world of kit building and a DJH J50 tank loco. As a first timer, every detail of the instruction sheet was read a dozen times before taking a variety of solders to bits of brass and white metal. Had a few issues regarding crankpins and the rods which took a while to resolve. The original crankpins supplied were threaded with top hat nuts and whilst the wheels were all in the correct position adding the rods required a few hours of on and off the loco whilst holes were opened out with a 5 sided broach.

 

Eventually I got it running smoothly, but the size of the holes in the rods meant a) it looked unacceptable and b) it had a somewhat clanky performance once running. There are some things I can live with and some I can't and once Tony Wright and other kit builders suggested changing to plain crank pins and nuts, the decision was made. Off they came and then it was a matter of soldering brass bushes into the oversize holes and starting again. Very glad I did that as it now runs smoothly or should I say, did? The screwdriver slot on the bloomin' grub screw sheared, so I'm now waiting for some stainless socket head screws off eBay. These really are miniscule with a 1.6mm thread and less than 2mm in length. You need a 0.7mm Allen key, so one of them is coming as well.

 

If I'm honest, I don't think I'm cut out for kit building. Yes, I can cope with the soldering, but somehow it really didn't float my boat. Of course I still have the body to assemble, but I suspect this will my first and last kit. I take my hat off to those guys like TW and Graham Varley who built most of my kit built locos, as they seem able to turn out wonderful models time after time and clearly get a lot of satisfaction from doing so. Good job, we're all different......;)

 

DSCF1616.jpg.80b19cc8f5f75c25af01744bd2d20fd8.jpg

 

After the frustration of kit building it was back to something I enjoy and having proven the new storage layout will work, a few bits of rail, some new Marcway sleeper strip and a switched crossing, single slip emerged. I'm very happy with the quality of the Marcway strips and they represent great value for money. Now my preferred product.

 

DSCF1612.jpg.c911cfeba449ab0d4b7e46d9af43d227.jpg

 

This will be a drop in replacement for the existing C10 turnout, so once I get through my health issues, I should be able to get the both gradients built for the storage roads and shed above.

 

Final pic is just another RTR loco shot. The Q6 looks ex works right now, but will be turned into a well worn and filthy example soon. Another lovely runner, straight from the box, so good to see it trundle around. Photography can be a cruel mistress and already I can see work for the permanent way staff, with some pronounced straight lines, a minor dip and poor joins in the curve. They will have to come up and be realigned. No idea how I missed that when laying it in the first place, but it will have to be dealt with in the coming weeks. I know some will say take a look at real track and you'll see these things with the prototype, but it's just one of my hang ups.....:D

 

By the look of the pic, redecorating will be next.

 

DSCF1615.jpg.edd36d7d50ccd63509d2a9846edf8e81.jpg

 

Where on earth does the time go......

Edited by gordon s
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  • gordon s changed the title to Eastwood Town - Must be Monday, it's bin day again.....
33 minutes ago, gordon s said:

Afternoon all....

 

*snip*

 

Final pic is just another RTR loco shot. The Q6 looks ex works right now, but will be turned into a well worn and filthy example soon. Another lovely runner, straight from the box, so good to see it trundle around. Photography can be a cruel mistress and already I can see work for the permanent way staff, with some pronounced straight lines, a minor dip and poor joins in the curve. They will have to come up and be realigned. No idea how I missed that when laying it in the first place, but it will have to be dealt with in the coming weeks. I know some will say take a look at real track and you'll see these things with the prototype, but it's just one of my hang ups.....:D

 

By the look of the pic, redecorating will be next.

 

DSCF1615.jpg.edd36d7d50ccd63509d2a9846edf8e81.jpg

 

Where on earth does the time go......

 

Don't be in too much of a rush to tweak your less-than-chocolate box track, Gordon (unless of course it is causing ropey running)

 

The real thing wasn't always perfect - indeed even these days is not - and whilst it's a fine line between sloppy and life like (same with lining of locos, dents and dings, and things not being parallel when they should be, in theory), you may find the 50p bit curve, and roller coaster rails, give you some character that makes the track look more real world than perfect geometry would...

 

Food for thought.

 

Regards

 

Scott

 

 

 

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On 05/03/2021 at 08:20, gordon s said:

Judging by the holes I get in my golf socks, I may well have....:D

 

That's the only way you'll get a hole in one.

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  • gordon s changed the title to Eastwood Town - Love at first sight.....

I found the Hornby J15 to be equally surprising Gordon.  Similar drive, very heavy, and quite the best running RTR steam loco I have come across, including some expensive Yank jobs on my last layout.  The J15 has no relevance at all to any layout interests, I just got it (cost price - I was a dealer at the time!)  because it was so good.  It lives on a display shelf with my re-group and other weird impulse purchases!

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Totally agree, Neil. I grew up with J15’s shunting at Palmers Green and the Hornby Model has another wonderful chassis. These two really are exceptional runners, so hats off to Hornby on these two.

 

Thanks for the heads up on the J27, Scott, as I had missed it completely. Now ordered on Hattons. I can see lots of local freight ahead.....

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22 minutes ago, gordon s said:

Totally agree, Neil. I grew up with J15’s shunting at Palmers Green and the Hornby Model has another wonderful chassis. These two really are exceptional runners, so hats off to Hornby on these two.

 

Thanks for the heads up on the J27, Scott, as I had missed it completely. Now ordered on Hattons. I can see lots of local freight ahead.....

 

Excellent!  I've got my name in the queue, too, obviously - it's right up my (NE) alley!

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Go on Gordon.. you know you need more than one J27. My two are Nucast Kits and weigh an absolute ton..

 

2060214221_67895J27sideonsunbright.JPG.62230f259054ebc413cd0e1e8fd61eb5.JPG

 

I did a weathering commission on a J27 .. I liked the photograph provided I weathered one of mine the same.

 

Lovely engines - and yes.. I can remember them from my childhood.

 

Baz

Edited by Barry O
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  • AY Mod changed the title to Eastwood Town - A tribute to Gordon's modelling.
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