Jump to content

gordon s

Eastwood Town ...Brass monkey weather...

Recommended Posts

Gordon

 

I think its just getting the balance right between trackwork and stock, nothing wrong if you choose to use RTR stock over hand built track just make sure that the wheels are compatible with the standards you are using.

 

Most of all just enjoy what you are doing !!

 

Have you tried the new C&L flexi track, it has a much thicker base (1.6mm) also for those who like something a bit more detailed has keys in the chairs and in 60' panels. I find the bases have a bit more rigidity as do the Exactoscale fast track bases and the new Peco bullhead track

  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
On 22/11/2019 at 18:50, hayfield said:

Gordon

 

I also found out the usefulness of mitre bond

 

Known as "man glue" in our household. Again after discovering it when fitting a kitchen it is used for loads more than sticking plinths together :)

 

I use the Screwfix stuff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, RedgateModels said:

 

Known as "man glue" in our household. Again after discovering it when fitting a kitchen it is used for loads more than sticking plinths together :)

 

I use the Screwfix stuff

 

I now also use an industrial grade superglue rather than the cheaper grades from supermarkets & chain stores. Its far stronger, seems not to clog in the nozzle and last longer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, gordon s said:

Is it Groundhog Day?....https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_happy.png

 

Just woken up to see the start of what could be endless discussion on fractions of a mm. No problem at all with that, other than as Martin suggests, ET is not the place.

 

Andy, I would prefer you start another thread on the pro’s and con’s of H0-SF as I’m more than happy with the running quality of my own track. Any comments I have made regards gauge widening on minimum side play, long wheelbase loco’s is not a reflection on the standard, but more likely to be poor workmanship on my part or a loco which has insufficient side play for the radius involved.

 

An early start for me as another Winter League game with a must win result beckons......
 

 

 

My apologies for the interruption. I'm agreeing with both you and Martin. I'll follow up elsewhere.

 

Andy

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Evening all....

 

Had a fun few days, particularly when I printed off 40 odd pages and I just couldn't get them to line up with the existing plan. Tried for an hour or so, went to bed and still wondered why. After a while I noticed the track gauge didn't appear to line up with the existing track, so stuck my vernier across my prints only to find the gauge was 18mm....:D

 

Purely operator error through the use of a duff vernier. I upgraded to Windows 10 and for some reason had to recalibrate my printer. Simple to do if you have something that measures accurately....90mm became 83mm on my vernier so that was duly entered and of course everything was printed oversize to compensate.

 

Dummy of the week prize goes to Mr S of Berkshire...:banghead:

 

The sheets have all been reprinted and thankfully they fit on the amended baseboard and align with the existing track.

 

I really need more space in which to work as once you add the two boards together, they must be 10-12' across the room.

 

DSCF0103.jpg.be6133e8e8b05080a5ece03b7464e496.jpg

 

Quite pleased the way it's starting to come together and can't wait to see up to four trains running through this approach to ET .

 

DSCF0101.jpg.2a46a32879071a4386d1410df82990ba.jpg

 

Reading from left to right they are the shed road which will go up an incline to the bridge I mocked up a few days ago.

 

The in/out road from the traverser that will descend and cut under the shed road on the next board round the corner.

 

The four running lines. Two slow and two fast in pairs. No idea which is up and which is down, though no doubt someone will explain. Did they go up to London or down to London? For me it was and still is 'oop north and down sarf.....

 

Then we have the good yard entrance and finally the diesel MPD.

 

The golf course looks like it's going to be closed for a few days yet, so I may well get some more done in the next few days.

 

Hope those who went to Warley had a good time. Thanks for posting pics and video's. Much appreciated as I doubt I will ever go. The days of struggling round a packed exhibition hall are long gone. Sad to hear three of the guys I've grown up with passed on today. Now I know how my parents felt as their contemporaries left the planet.

Edited by gordon s
  • Like 8
  • Friendly/supportive 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In railway terms, Gordon "Up" is towards London, unless you were the Midland then "Up" is towards Derby of course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Jonathan, but fascinated to know how that came about, as in latitude terms London is south of most cities.

 

Of course anything north of Watford Gap is ‘oop north for those of us brought up in North London...^_^

  • Agree 1
  • Friendly/supportive 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, gordon s said:

Thanks Jonathan, but fascinated to know how that came about, as in latitude terms London is south of most cities.

 

Of course anything north of Watford Gap is ‘oop north for those of us brought up in North London...https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_happy.png

After we moved from Mill Hill to Edinburgh it took a long time to get used to the idea of signs on the M6 reading Penrith and the South.

  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Rowsley17D said:

In railway terms, Gordon "Up" is towards London, unless you were the Midland then "Up" is towards Derby of course.

What about the LYR, and other railways not going in any way whatsoever near, to or from London, even if via another railway? ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Regularity said:

What about the LYR, and other railways not going in any way whatsoever near, to or from London, even if via another railway? https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_wink3.gif

 

It's not about geography, it's about socio-economic importance. You go "Up To Town" and "Down To The Country". The Up direction is generally towards the more important destination, often the railway company's works or headquarters.

 

If in doubt, look at the crossbars on the telegraph poles. They are on the Up side of the pole. Likewise along roads, the crossbars are on the telephone exchange side of the pole.

 

Martin.

  • Agree 1
  • Informative/Useful 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understood Up and Down originated with colliery wagonways, the colliery, the centre of operations, being uphill of the unloading point (the wagonways were usually gravity assisted).  On the railways the line to the centre of operations, London for many concerns, Derby for the Midland, Glasgow for the Caledonian, Manchester for the L&Y, was designated the Up line.  In an number of places the Up line became the Down line and some, I think, were changed during signalling rationalisation not that long ago.

 

Alan

  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow,  that's some pretty good chippying! Looks like the printer has been busy as well.

 

Would  it be worth investing in a wood burning stove , to reduce the number of trips to the tip.

 

Looking forward to further updates.

 

 

  • Thanks 1
  • Funny 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you look carefully you can see the 2009 version burning nicely.......

 

IMG_5796.jpg.d59a6621b33cba4b37e3bf053d0bc756.jpg

 

Funnily enough, ply doesn't burn that well unless you have a few logs to keep the heat going. In any case, the boys at the tip would complain. Their layout is far ahead of mine....:D

 

  • Like 10
  • Informative/Useful 1
  • Funny 4
  • Friendly/supportive 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, gordon s said:

Who have thought such a simple hobby would generate so much mess....or maybe it's just me.

No, it's not just you Gordon. I generally clear up move the mess out of shot before I take photos to give the impression that everything is neat and tidy.

  • Agree 3
  • Thanks 1
  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it was light-hearted but please don't burn engineered wood in a stove, the glue and other treatments knacker the flue and also give off some nasty gases.

  • Agree 3
  • Informative/Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Gordon,

 Ply does not burn well if it is piled on the fire flat stopping any air drawing the fire through. Put on edge and randomly to allow the air passage makes it burn really well.

The same is true with chipboard or any other wood based sheet material.

trustytrev.:)

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Buhar said:

I know it was light-hearted but please don't burn engineered wood in a stove, the glue and other treatments knacker the flue and also give off some nasty gases.

Hello,

     Not much different to coal then. As far as I am aware the fumes given of by burning any wood is toxic.

That is why chimneys were invented.

trustytrev.:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, trustytrev said:

Not much different to coal then. As far as I am aware the fumes given of by burning any wood is toxic.

 

Coal and manufactured wood are completely different, The glues and resins give off some particularly noxious gases which you really don't want to inhale, they also coat the inside of a chimney/flue and hang around long after the fire has gone out.

  • Agree 4
  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, chris p bacon said:

 

Coal and manufactured wood are completely different, The glues and resins give off some particularly noxious gases which you really don't want to inhale, they also coat the inside of a chimney/flue and hang around long after the fire has gone out.

Yes, I agree with that. Funnily enough, engineered wood burns at a lower temperature, and (as Dave Bacon has noted) it sometimes leaves residue within the flue. If you do wish to burn engineered wood, mix it up with a higher calorific content, such as coal, or hardwood offcuts. If your main firewood fuel is indeed engineered wood, you will probably need the chimney swept twice a year. Use a good HETAS-registered sweep, and follow his advice. Please remember that the soot from engineered wood has a higher acidic value, so it might well shorten the life of any corrugated stainless steel flue. 

 

Cheers,

Ian.  

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Gordon,

 

If you are still surrounding yourself with Templot printouts, there is a new version 225d released today, which includes your suggested new option to add a prefix to the page ident (watermark) for a print run (and for PDF output):

2_131214_580000000.png



You won't want to write an entire novel in that box, because the text size has to be reduced to fit the prefix on the page:



2_131215_160000000.png

If you create multiple print runs it makes sense to be able to identify the pages from each one easily -- other than squinting at the date and time in the corner of the page. Leave the box blank if you don't want a prefix.

Many thanks for this suggestion, even if you don't remember making it. smile.gif

 

Your copy of Templot should update automatically if you restart it and follow the instructions (assuming you have an internet connection). More info at:

 

 http://85a.co.uk/forum/view_topic.php?id=3584&forum_id=1

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

  • Informative/Useful 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, what can I say other than 'thank you'......Christmas has come early....;)

 

I'll play around with it tomorrow and see how it works.

 

Health warning.....No need to do anything, but seeing your print above reminded me of something.....;)

 

I'm an impatient soul when I'm on a run and sometimes my brain works quicker than my computer. When looking at a large print run where I only need a few sheets from the top of the plan, I click on 'next row' numerous times and often find I've gone one row too many.....:D

 

The only way I know out of that is to cancel the print and start all over again....slowly.

 

Is there an easy way of going back to the previous row if you've gone too far?

 

Just curious.....;)

 

No need to do anything at all as I can manage, but if you're bored one afternoon and it's five minutes work and there isn't an existing fix, a previous row button would be nice......

 

The good news is that I've stopped woodwork and got back onto turnouts today. Built four today. Two for the traverser entrance and the two back at the ET station end which will allow the four tracks to pass through. I just fancied a change from woodwork. The good news on that front is that the gradients appear OK.

 

Funny thing was I had to scrap the business end of the first turnout I built today. I haven't built turnouts for a while and once I found all the right gauges and ancillaries thought it would be like riding a bike. Metaphorically speaking I'm now covered in plasters on my knees and elbows....,.

 

Strange how easily you forget all the really small details that enable you to make something without a bump or drop as wheels run across. I still use my blind testing method. Close your eyes and if you can feel where the crossing is, then it's either tweaked or binned. Anything else would drive me bonkers....

 

No golf again as we're still soggy, but that's good news as I'll be plodding away on ET again tomorrow.

Edited by gordon s
  • Like 4
  • Friendly/supportive 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.