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Here are some pictures of a very slowly evolving layout based on the Waverley Route in the early 1960s

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I like that a lot (especially the lever frame :) ). Hoping not to put my foot in my mouth, but there looks like a lot of ongoing scratch-building around the station. Is some of it just unfinished or are you using placeholders on your evolving layout?

 

Well done hiding it in the Kitbuilding and Scratchbuilding section, too. The Waverley Route pack hasn't found it yet, but I think I hear a slavering in the middle distance...

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I like that a lot (especially the lever frame https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_smile3.gif ). Hoping not to put my foot in my mouth, but there looks like a lot of ongoing scratch-building around the station. Is some of it just unfinished or are you using placeholders on your evolving layout?

 

Well done hiding it in the Kitbuilding and Scratchbuilding section, too. The Waverley Route pack hasn't found it yet, but I think I hear a slavering in the middle distance...

Quite so, they will be here any minute. Lovely track, working signals and scratchbuilt structures put this in a superior bracket irrespective of prototype. Not surprised it's taken some time!

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Speaking as a member of the Highland Brigade, some very good work here, even if its at the wrong end of the country :D , and look forward to following progress on this one.

Richard

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Waverley Route? Not heard much about that, but it looks like a deserving prototype that would reward further research :P

 

I confess I saw the word 'Slitrigg' on the Active Posts page and made a mental note to check back. Thankfully, a respected RMWebber may also have tipped me off in the neantime.

 

This is truly gorgeous and I look forward to seeing, reading and hearing more about it, especially as it's marginally earlier than my comfort zone (yes, that scurrying Clayton was duly noted). Scratch and bash is in my numble opinion the most wholesome way to signature WR structures, so if any of yours are placeholders at this stage than they look to be damned fine ones from this corner.

 

And the way the topography makes way for the viaduct (?) is of special interest too. More pictures would be most welcome, and if there's a vague plan or overview that would be really useful to see too.

 

Thanks for launching and sharing, and welcome aboard. :)

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Thanks for the complimentary comments :-).

 

All of the pointwork is handmade using SMP rail and sleepers. Plain line is SMP bullhead flexi or handmade flatbottom. Rails are 'notched' at 60ft spacing so that I get a realistic 'diddly-dum!' I cribbed this idea from the Alton layout 15 years ago.

 

Signals are built using MSE components and mechanically operated using GEM lever frames, anle cranks and piano wire with exception of Slitrigg, which uses a handbuilt frame I inherited from a deceased elderly friend.

 

Buildings and structures are all handmade using ply, card, plastic and are broadly based on NER or NBR structures.

 

The layout is a spiral figure 8 incorporating gradients, which requires banking - interesting with analogue control!

 

I am forming train rakes based on photos of prototypical trains and have written a typical 24 h timetable using the 'district controllers' book.

 

I will take some more pictures and post them when I have time.

 

Coronach

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Here is a rough diagram of my layout. It is approximately 14ft square and the complete running length, including fiddle yard is about 80ft.

 

There are four signal boxes and the signalling is almost complete - just a few shunting signals to finish at Whinburgh North.

  1. Whinburgh South
  2. Whinburgh North
  3. Whitrope Siding
  4. Slitrigg

I started the layout about 10 years agoat a previous house and completed the track about 3 years ago after moving. I am in the process of renewing the original pointwork at Whinburgh North which will include renewing the inside single slip with an outside single slip. This is to ease the curve into the loop platform with the objective of smoother running. I am taking a series of photos and will post them when the job is complete.

 

The last couple of years have focussed on formation of train rakes typically found on the Waverley route after the marshalling yards at Millerhill and Kingmoor were opened. This includes:

 

  • The Midland Scot sleeper (class 40 )
  • The Waverley (class 45)
  • The waverley relief (including through coaches from Bristol and Poole - modellers licence!) (A1/A3)
  • Carlisle - Edinburgh semi fasts (A3/V2/B1/ class 25/26)
  • Stopping passenger trains (V3/J39)
  • Fully fitted and mixed freights (A1/A3/V2/K3/B1/class 17/40)
  • Pick-up goods (J35/J39)
  • A variety of parcels trains - my particular interest (any of the above!)

It is helpful that there are now a few books with decent photos of trains that operated on this route. It is important form me to get the coaching stock right - most of which is BR Mk1 and Gresley/Thompson with a few Staniers and the odd hawkesworth/Bullied thrown in for good measure. Of course, with parcels and goods trains the options are limitless. I could fill the layout with parcels vans! Variety is the key.

 

Thats all for now

 

Coronach

 

COL1STSOUTH01_20110407_130326.pdf

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I am gradually weathering all my stock to a consistent level. Mostly I use dry brushing and paint on-wipe off techniques using rail match, humbrol and precision paints. Roofs are 'roof dirt(!)' with talc brushed on when nearly dry to create a better texture. Frames and wheels are painted 'frame dirt' (!!) which is then similarly lightly brushed with talc. Rust colour (light and dark) is added to those areas prone to dry corrosion, oily areas is highlight with 'roof dirt' and then 'brake dust' is very lightly brushed over frames to highlight detail. The phrase 'little is more' applies here otherwise colours can be too garish. I also use 'roof dirt' on those areas where muck collects such as door hinges, door stops, roof board brackets and around window frames. This helps to emphasise the details and bring out the best in what are basically very good but originally shiny plastic models. I find that the only detail that needs to be added are carriage destination boards and tail lamps.

 

Most of this approach results from years of observation looking at the real thing. It is important to understand how and why dirt builds up on vehicles, where it comes from (smoke, brake dust, oil, corrosion etc) and the fact that it gets there because trains move. You will notice that the state of vehicle that have spent years in sidings differs from vehicles that are regularly used. Unused vehicles tend to turn green and rusty whereas used vehicles turn brown and oily!

 

I use the same approach to track and structures. The colour of track and ballast is just as important.

 

 

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Here is a rough diagram of my layout. It is approximately 14ft square and the complete running length, including fiddle yard is about 80ft.

 

There are four signal boxes and the signalling is almost complete - just a few shunting signals to finish at Whinburgh North.

  1. Whinburgh South
  2. Whinburgh North
  3. Whitrope Siding
  4. Slitrigg

I started the layout about 10 years agoat a previous house and completed the track about 3 years ago after moving. I am in the process of renewing the original pointwork at Whinburgh North which will include renewing the inside single slip with an outside single slip. This is to ease the curve into the loop platform with the objective of smoother running. I am taking a series of photos and will post them when the job is complete.

 

The last couple of years have focussed on formation of train rakes typically found on the Waverley route after the marshalling yards at Millerhill and Kingmoor were opened. This includes:

 

  • The Midland Scot sleeper (class 40 )
  • The Waverley (class 45)
  • The waverley relief (including through coaches from Bristol and Poole - modellers licence!) (A1/A3)
  • Carlisle - Edinburgh semi fasts (A3/V2/B1/ class 25/26)
  • Stopping passenger trains (V3/J39)
  • Fully fitted and mixed freights (A1/A3/V2/K3/B1/class 17/40)
  • Pick-up goods (J35/J39)
  • A variety of parcels trains - my particular interest (any of the above!)

It is helpful that there are now a few books with decent photos of trains that operated on this route. It is important form me to get the coaching stock right - most of which is BR Mk1 and Gresley/Thompson with a few Staniers and the odd hawkesworth/Bullied thrown in for good measure. Of course, with parcels and goods trains the options are limitless. I could fill the layout with parcels vans! Variety is the key.

 

Thats all for now

 

Coronach

 

 

 

 

Add me to the above mentioned slabbering pack of WR fans.

 

Really liking your running lists, very similar to my own. A nice mix of steam and diesel, best of both worlds.

 

PS Nice user name too!!

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This is fantastic! The modelling is of a very good standard indeed!

 

I love the design as the (folded?) figure of 8 seems to make best use of the space. Do you have more details of the fiddle yards and any gradients? It's very similar to the arrangement my dad's considering.

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A few more pictures. The lighting in the loft is terrible, either the flash is too bright or the pictures come out too yellow but it gives you a flavour!

 

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Hi James, thank you for the compliments.

 

I designed the layout this way to make the most of the available space. My gradients are steeper than they really should be which means that some locos suffer wheel spin with more than 4 Bachmann coaches. The class 40 and 45 will easily take 8 Bachmann mk1s and the Hornby pacifics (Britannia, A3) will take 6/7 but the Bachmann A1 and Jubilee slip like mad with more than 4 which is a shame. At least the Waverley route trains often had bankers on the back! My advice is to keep your gradients as shallow as possible but of course you only need a few inches clearance so it shouldn't be a problem.

 

If anyone has any suggestions about improving the adhesion of a Bachmann jubilee and A1, please let me know.

 

This is fantastic! The modelling is of a very good standard indeed!

 

I love the design as the (folded?) figure of 8 seems to make best use of the space. Do you have more details of the fiddle yards and any gradients? It's very similar to the arrangement my dad's considering.

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Very nice indeed! I share your frustrations about getting decent photos, but from what I have seen so far this is yet another very high quality addition to the forum. Please keep us up to date with progress, and thanks for sharing it with us. I hate gradients, but I imagine it would be rather difficult to model the Waverley route without including some! John Houlden has added weight to some Bachmann A1's for me. I'll ask him for some details,and get back to you as soon as I can.

 

Gilbert

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Thanks Gilbert, that would be very helpful.

 

Very nice indeed! I share your frustrations about getting decent photos, but from what I have seen so far this is yet another very high quality addition to the forum. Please keep us up to date with progress, and thanks for sharing it with us. I hate gradients, but I imagine it would be rather difficult to model the Waverley route without including some! John Houlden has added weight to some Bachmann A1's for me. I'll ask him for some details,and get back to you as soon as I can.

 

Gilbert

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Thanks Richard. I really like your models of Kyle and The Mound. Both stations look so realistic when compared with colour photos taken in the 50s and 60s. I particularly like The Mound. railways in Scotland are so atmospheric and they were/are a central part of the wider local community at each station with postbuses, mail vans and so on meeting infrequent trains.

 

My first 4mm layout was a model of Mallaig but I never completed it before moving house. I decided to build a model of the Waverley route because there is scope for 'big' trains hauled by 'big' LNER loco's. My inspiration is photos of LNER locos in Scotland taken by WJV Anderson and his peers. There are some really good colour albums around nowadays. Also, Peter Handford made some excellent recordings of V2s, A3s etc on the Waverley route (of which I recently downloaded some as ipod tunes from Amazon!!! 69p each!!!).

 

I look forward to seeing more of your work.

 

Coronach

 

 

 

Speaking as a member of the Highland Brigade, some very good work here, even if its at the wrong end of the country https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_grin.gif , and look forward to following progress on this one.

Richard

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...railways in Scotland are so atmospheric and they were/are a central part of the wider local community at each station with postbuses, mail vans and so on meeting infrequent trains.

 

So important, that facet of the WR, more so to some extent at the intermediate stops, after closure of the branches. Reminds us how the line was a means to a great social end, and a part of something much, much wider than just the locos and stock.

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The eye consciously ignores the part-finished aspect of this layout, so well does it speak of time and place. You have made a beautiful job of Firth of Clyde too.

 

I am also interested to hear that the Peter Handford recordings are available online - I'll have to look that up.

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The layout is definitely 'evolving'!

 

There are just a few Peter Handford ipod tracks - may be a few more CDs

I would like to know whether the Peter Handford archive will be made available one day. I believe everything was placed with the NRM after he died.

 

The eye consciously ignores the part-finished aspect of this layout, so well does it speak of time and place. You have made a beautiful job of Firth of Clyde too.

 

I am also interested to hear that the Peter Handford recordings are available online - I'll have to look that up.

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Hi,

 

Finally managed to talk to John Houlden. He says he just uses strips of lead where there is space within the boiler, and tries to keep the centre of gravity correct. I know Tony Wright did a much more complex job which was fearured in BRM a few years ago. That included removing bogie springs and other tweaks. Unfortunately TW is not contactable at present, so I can't check with him. It is also worth checking the loco to tender connection, as sometimes the tender is pushing the loco upwards, which does no good at all for traction. At one stage I swopped tenders between one loco which would haul no more than 5 coaches, and another which had no problem with 9. The result was an immediate reversal of haulage ability, so it's worth looking at that, and if necessary just bending the drawbar a bit. Or you can do what I now recollect TW did about that, which was to remove the Bachmann coupling arrangement altogether, and just manufacture a replacement hook and bar. Hope that helps.

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Thank you for the advice. I had a problem with the loco-tender coupling when I first bought the loco and tweaked it then. I am reluctant to remove the bogie spring because I do not want to replace an adhesion problem with a derailment problem. I will look at the tender coupling again and then, as you suggest, try adding lead strip within the boiler.

 

Hi,

 

Finally managed to talk to John Houlden. He says he just uses strips of lead where there is space within the boiler, and tries to keep the centre of gravity correct. I know Tony Wright did a much more complex job which was fearured in BRM a few years ago. That included removing bogie springs and other tweaks. Unfortunately TW is not contactable at present, so I can't check with him. It is also worth checking the loco to tender connection, as sometimes the tender is pushing the loco upwards, which does no good at all for traction. At one stage I swopped tenders between one loco which would haul no more than 5 coaches, and another which had no problem with 9. The result was an immediate reversal of haulage ability, so it's worth looking at that, and if necessary just bending the drawbar a bit. Or you can do what I now recollect TW did about that, which was to remove the Bachmann coupling arrangement altogether, and just manufacture a replacement hook and bar. Hope that helps.

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