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Re: the diagonal stripes. 

 

Would they have gone into the top corner if there was a full end door rather than a partial one?

 

Just wondering if they had an actual significance rather than just a painters foible?

 

Regards

 

Ian

 

The latter. The 'rules' (made to be broken) were that the stripe should go where there vast majority were, i.e., bottom corner to the top of the hinge. Of course, the painter had to know this but they seem to be remarkably consistent so this is an error on someone's part. It's pretty rare but it did happen, probably as the result of a repaint somewhere along the line.

 

Adam

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 8183193099_70dbf59468_z.jpg

A Cravens rarity by Lost-Albion, on Flickr

 

 

That is a lovely photo when blown up. In the foreground gives us another LMS RCH mineral number and a view of the interior, as well as a lovely 'little' load in the open merchandise. Then there appears to be two rows of tipplers in chalk traffic - a number are suitably branded but all appear to have had the same load. And behind these 4 Sand tipplers as well as lots of other interesting wagons - slope sided mineral, GWR van with a frame door.... I wonder which was scrapped first, that GWR van or the Palvan :jester:

 

Paul Bartlett

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That is a lovely photo when blown up. In the foreground gives us another LMS RCH mineral number and a view of the interior, as well as a lovely 'little' load in the open merchandise. Then there appears to be two rows of tipplers in chalk traffic - a number are suitably branded but all appear to have had the same load. And behind these 4 Sand tipplers as well as lots of other interesting wagons - slope sided mineral, GWR van with a frame door.... I wonder which was scrapped first, that GWR van or the Palvan :jester:

 

Paul Bartlett

Even better, when looking at the rows of what seem to be homogenous tipplers, there are a few 16t minerals, as well as tipplers with both Independent and 8-shoe brakegear.

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That is a lovely photo when blown up.

 

Add check out how much more disressed the planking is on the inside as opposed to the outside of the 13t open. Crying out to be modelled.

 

And judging by the flat topped electrification coach over in the distance it'll not be long before the wires are up. See Mr. Carrolls photo back on page 32 of the thread. http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/36891-16t-minerals/page-32&do=findComment&comment=804599

 

Porcy

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The wagons on the internal train look interesting, does anyone else think the second wagon looks like a cut down "Ashworth Kirk" timber?

 

Mark Saunders

'Not sure of the origins of the underframes but the wagons were built from redundant stock in the main repair shops at Corby. They were internal user only, used mainly as in this shot for transporting scrap tubes from the tubeworks back to the blast furnaces for re-processing. They were pretty rudimentary in their construction, angle iron and tube, and had a hard life, not lasting long. I presume the underframes were re-used for as long as they were serviceable, having new bodies at regular intervals.

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8117352605_fd9bcdf2c1_z.jpg

 

What's that little loading bank for do we think? Seems to be for emptying stuff into the minerals, but what might that be on such a small scale? Or just coincidence that they are parked next to it?

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8117352605_fd9bcdf2c1_z.jpg

 

What's that little loading bank for do we think? Seems to be for emptying stuff into the minerals, but what might that be on such a small scale? Or just coincidence that they are parked next to it?

It would be for emptying some sort of bulk product into wagons. There were quite a lot like this around the place, usually just one or two wagons long. The wagons would be moved by gravity (as they were at Redmire, where the loading area was covered by a shed), by pinchbar, horse or even a shunter.

Examples that come to mind are:-

Higham Ferrers (iron ore)

Redmire (limestone)

Longport (coke from adjacent gasworks?)

Liskeard (stone)

In the 1980s, the one at Longport, which was quite a bit higher than that shown (perhaps to clear the raves on coke wagons), was used to tip scrap from a nearby yard into wagons. The experiment didn't last; steel-bodied wagons made a terrible noise, whilst the effects on those with wood floors or planked bodies can be imagined...

Edited by Fat Controller
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