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apart from the Welsh to English, can anyone think of stations that are not spelt the same as the town they serve?

start you off with Whittlesea

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Does Ebbsfleet International count? It serves Northfleet. At least there's no placename called Ebbsfleet on the OS map, and I'd never heard of Ebbsfleet when I grew up in that part of Kent.

I think they made up a new name because Northfleet didn't sound nice enough, and with the recession, all the new construction that would have been called Ebbsfleet hasn't happened. Although the local football team (Gravesend & Northfleet Football Club) changed their name to match the new. non-existent regeneration!

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According to Wikipedia Eaglescliffe is allegedly a mis-spelling of the nearby village of Egglescliffe, and the community of Eaglescliffe later grew up around the station.

 

Then there's Newhey/New Hey, and I recall a debate many years ago about whether Tooting Bec had a full stop or not.

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I'm sure in my yoof there was a station called Lyghe Halt which is now called Leigh, in common with the village not far from Tonbridge that it serves.

 

Not a station mis-spelling, but the town of Cranleigh, on the Horsham - Guildford line closed in the mid-60s, had, shortly before the railway was built, had its spelling changed from Cranley to Cranleigh. The story is that the Post Office were getting fed up with confused mail between Cranley and not-far-away Crawley due to poor writing.

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It might not be a little harsh to suggest that the GWR were masters of this, frequently sighting stations in one location then saying that the station served somewhere else. A good example of this being Wrangaton station in South Devon. This was called Kingsbridge road (suggesting that it served Kingsbridge, yet the station was more than 11 miles from Kingsbridge.

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Lyndhurst Road in the New Forest is similar, it changed it's name to Ashurst (New Forest) in 1997

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Hemel Hempsted on the MR branch from Harpenden to Hemel Hempstead.

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Not a different spelling but "Patney and Chirton" station on the Berks/Hants line was originally called "Patney Bridge" but after confusion regarding "Putney Bridge" station in London it was changed to "Patney and Chirton".

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A place I used to live, and probably well-known to Coachmann; I give you Upper Mill (it's really one word)

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There's a village in Derbyshire which can't seem to make up it's mind whether it's Youlgeave or Youlgrave, there are signposts spelt either way.

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apart from the Welsh to English, can anyone think of stations that are not spelt the same as the town they serve?

start you off with Whittlesea

 

 

The railway and brick company could agree on the name..post-4034-0-97141900-1305270884_thumb.jpg

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Leek Brook is the correct railway spelling and the village is Leekbrook

 

Bramshall nr Uttoxeter was Bromshall on the railway

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I think one that could reopen skirmishes of long ago is Scotch Dyke, the miscegenation of Scots Dyke, heading out of England on the Waverley line.

 

But maybe that's one for the Waverlophiles and pedants such as I :rolleyes:

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Dudding Hill signalbox in Dudden Hill NW London is another that got lost in translation.

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Lyndhurst Road in the New Forest is similar, it changed it's name to Ashurst (New Forest) in 1997

 

 

and so I suppose is Paddock Wood, which started life as Maidstone Road. The little wrinkle with this is that there was no settlement there before the railway. The name changed in Victorian times as the village grew up - according to the Kentrail site it changed names as early as 1844 when the Maidstone Branch opened.

 

 

I was also going to offer Slades Green as an example, as the area as far as I know is actually Slade Green, but I can't confirm this. Also there is no Lee (on the Dartford loop via Sidcup); the place is Lee Green.

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... Slades Green...

Older maps certainly show it as Slades Green with the extra S. (The location, not the station)

 

And don't let's get started on whether Kings/King's Cross and similar names should have an apostrophe or not. Mind you, I did once see a handwritten notice for Leed's.

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Wells-next-the-Sea in Norfolk was called Wells-by-Sea by both the LNER and BR (BR later changed it).

 

Watlington, also in Norfolk, started life as Watlington before becoming Magdalen Road, the name I knew it by when I was growing up and that survived through the NSE era. It's now Watlington again.

 

Paul

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Wells-next-the-Sea in Norfolk was called Wells-by-Sea by both the LNER and BR (BR later changed it).

 

 

 

Actually, to be a rivet counter again, it was Wells on Sea until BR finally got it right. ;)

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Older maps certainly show it as Slades Green with the extra S. (The location, not the station)

thanks for this

And don't let's get started on whether Kings/King's Cross and similar names should have an apostrophe or not. Mind you, I did once see a handwritten notice for Leed's.

Completely OT but that reminds me of the big advert in Leeds station in the mid 80's from the Leeds Permanent Buildings Society. "British rail are getting there. We've been here since 1848."

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Not really serving a town of a different name but the signs at Walton in Essex keep changing between Walton-On-Naze and Walton-On-THE-Naze.

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Actually, to be a rivet counter again, it was Wells on Sea until BR finally got it right. ;)

 

You're quite right -- that'll teach me to try to do things by memory instead of looking them up!

 

Paul

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Harringay/Haringey. Also Crossgates or Cross Gates near Leeds, both names are on the platform signs! Newark Northgate or North Gate is another.

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Harringay/Haringey.

Well, yes and no. Both Harringay and Harringay Park (Green Lanes) were correctly named as that is the name of the immediate area they serve. It's just that when the new Local Authority was set up in 1965, it was given the name Haringey - presumably to acknowledge that its 11 square miles covers 3 former boroughs.

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Well, yes and no. Both Harringay and Harringay Park (Green Lanes) were correctly named as that is the name of the immediate area they serve. It's just that when the new Local Authority was set up in 1965, it was given the name Haringey - presumably to acknowledge that its 11 square miles covers 3 former boroughs.

 

Harringay, Haringey and Hornsey are all variant spellings of the same name (Dictionary of British Place Names) and have been used variously over the years, not one is either correct or incorrect. Haringey is not a modern invention.

 

Keith

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