Jump to content

Recommended Posts

The new quayside trackage with the infill very nearly complete including the all important painting in of the dug out flangeways gaps with my favourite crud colour. Any bits you may spot that I may have missed is a mistake on my part. The redundant very broad gauge track was for a once envisaged travelling crane - might model that later as a disused relic - will save having to make it work. The odd looking thing at far right between the rails is the operating 'poke a crowbar in' device for the adjacent blades. It will be disguised/have attention drawn to it by and old bit of planking or corrugated tin. Why is it in the middle of the running line? Well thats where it ended up and I thought 'never seen that done before' so what the heck. I shall apply myself up to the cobbling soon when I have determined which pattern(s) (square setts, oblong, round, nicked from the beach, rectangular pattern, fan shaped, herring bone, parallel with the rails or 90deg to the track......it goes on and on, just any old cobbles won't do in this case) I shall use. I'll have to get all my old cobblers pictures out. Brian.

post-5773-0-37157300-1327523515_thumb.jpg

  • Like 14
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just been fettling around with some of the paving on some of the inset and thought some might like to see this pic of a seldom seen modelled but often seen in the prototype, detail. My effort tries to represent an area where the pavement, either by frost heave or settlement or what I like to think of as the road surface having been rolled out and squeezed up like pastry by HGV's etc, (I'm sure civil engineers out there can supply the proper term for it) and the resulting 'lip' rolled down flat again by the passing rail wheels where they overlap the railhead. It's a bit subtle I know but I like it. Brian.

post-5773-0-96484100-1328004902_thumb.jpg

  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites

...and the resulting 'lip' rolled down flat again by the passing rail wheels where they overlap the railhead.

 

Brian,

 

Beautiful trackwork as always. I believe this photo shows the effect you have replicated so well, albeit in a scruffy engineer's siding rather than a properly paved tramway:

 

post-9324-0-62259400-1328017467_thumb.jpg

 

Cheers,

 

Will

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian,

 

Beautiful trackwork as always. I believe this photo shows the effect you have replicated so well, albeit in a scruffy engineer's siding rather than a properly paved tramway:

 

post-9324-0-62259400-1328017467_thumb.jpg

 

Cheers,

 

Will

Thank you Will, yes that is exactly the sort of thing I was trying to replicate. I can't decide to go a bit further and try to model a squashed hedgehog as well, no perhaps not, it upsets the children, Brian.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian, Have you heard of the headless chickens that pervade railroads in south Florida? The locals (Haitians?) put the live chickens (tied up) in paper bags on the lines - it is endemic and disgusting, frankly, although some people have actually modelled it.

 

Best, Pete.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Will, yes that is exactly the sort of thing I was trying to replicate. I can't decide to go a bit further and try to model a squashed hedgehog as well, no perhaps not, it upsets the children, Brian.

 

Speaking for my seven year old, I can think of few things he would find funnier than spotting your squashed hedgehog. In my experience children are bloodthirsty little creatures!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Brian....a quick question..not about trackage, but about the canal?

 

What sort of height do you have for the quayside above the water? Is this dimension factual, or what you had to hand?

 

Also, what do you suggest as a minimum width for a canal spur? [ I take it you know more about such things in Europe....which is the information I'm interested in]...

 

BTW, bodies in the canal can be easily modelled, using the old Airfix figures..their faces come ready-grizzly, and they also come ready-equipped with concrete overshoes.....

Edited by alastairq
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian....a quick question..not about trackage, but about the canal?

 

What sort of height do you have for the quayside above the water? Is this dimension factual, or what you had to hand?

 

Also, what do you suggest as a minimum width for a canal spur? [ I take it you know more about such things in Europe....which is the information I'm interested in]...

 

BTW, bodies in the canal can be easily modelled, using the old Airfix figures..their faces come ready-grizzly, and they also come ready-equipped with concrete overshoes.....

 

Ah the vexed question of dimensions. I usually approach this sort of thing using my 'what looks right technology' which mostly works for me. Actual free board on canals, from what I've seen varies from several metres down to the water lapping over the edge. I have attached a not very good picture looking along one of the waterways on QUAI:87 which should give some idea of what I've done here. I ended up with this sort of depth so that it all looked like what I've seen around the areas I'm interested in. I also had to have sufficient height to allow me to model a representation of the swing bridge turning mechanism but not too high as to have the bridges way above the water level and looking silly. Width of canal spurs? again you name it really, just bear in mind that two barges will need to pass. I model this sort of thing so that I feel comfortable with the result - what I've seen and as I remember it, and even dare I say, as I wish it had of been. Sticking to actual prototype dimensions for things like this can, I think inhibit the creation of a very good looking model which

otherwise might not get built. The modelled waterways on QUAI:87 are far too small (narrow) really but any wider, let alone scaleish width, would take up far too large a proportion of the layout for my liking so they have been much compressed. Artistic impression and interpretation is the key here I think. European canals generally are much wider than what we find in the UK. Also minor canals are not very deep - the wally who drove his Tabant into the water was able to get out OK and paddle through the mud and climb up to dry land. Thank you for your interest - hope all this is of some help. Brian.

post-5773-0-58118600-1329658974_thumb.jpg

  • Like 13
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

excellent Brian.....any suggestions for effective 'check' rail representation for inset trackage, aside from more rail itself? [cost is crucial I'm afraid]

 

My answer won't help much if cost is an issue. But there is a US producer of tram rail, track and points that are simply superb and really not that unreasonable a price unless you need lots. Can't remem ber the name now nor even where I cam across them on t'internet.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My answer won't help much if cost is an issue. But there is a US producer of tram rail, track and points that are simply superb and really not that unreasonable a price unless you need lots. Can't remem ber the name now nor even where I cam across them on t'internet.

 

I think this is what you were after; http://www.proto87.com/easy-street-track-system.html

Usual disclaimer

 

Cheers,

 

David

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

The demolition crew have moved in on QUAI:87, what a mess they make. The plan is to relay the tracks in this area so that they wriggle in and out between the piers of the overhead line in a more interesting/prototypical/unlikely way. Also there were a few sq ins of baseboard there with no track on and you know how that upsets me. More to follow, Brian.

post-5773-0-80525600-1331227073_thumb.jpg

  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Such a nice day today that I thought I'd give the log train a run, after all they're running one now on the Heathfield branch not a mile from here. The Shay is basic Bachmann, now radio controlled and battery powered (track and wheel cleaning before each run was spoiling the fun) and wheels re-profiled to run on my proto garden track. The logs have been lovingly hand hewn by Lady Zob from our own estate in the back garden. Running up and down the switchback layout is very relaxing, doesn't even disturb Mrs Blackbird who is busily nest building in the hedge in the background. Brian

post-5773-0-13817600-1332763369_thumb.jpg

post-5773-0-34773400-1332763422_thumb.jpg

  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Brian,

 

Good to see the developments on Quai 87 and that the garden line is still going strong. Next time we meet up I will have to give another engine of mine a trial run on the Quai's curves !!

 

Cheers Ian

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Hi Brian,

 

Good to see the developments on Quai 87 and that the garden line is still going strong. Next time we meet up I will have to give another engine of mine a trial run on the Quai's curves !!

 

Cheers Ian

 

Hello Ian, yes things are developing on QUAI:87. You're welcome to bring along a new loco to try on some of the more hazardous bits of track like this new line over the feeder canal. Regards, Brian.

post-5773-0-55171400-1335200923_thumb.jpg

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

A few snaps taken at a meet of the German Railway Society held at 'Schloß Zobland' kindly hosted by Baron & Baroness Von Harrap of Axalp.

 

A birdseye view of the 'new works'

post-6728-0-74952600-1336292994_thumb.jpg

 

post-6728-0-67495800-1336293460_thumb.jpg

 

post-6728-0-63698700-1336293637_thumb.jpg

 

And of course the good Baron himself!

post-6728-0-77120900-1336294071_thumb.jpg

  • Like 13
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.