Jump to content
Pixie

Any Question Answered

Recommended Posts

While black works well in a theatre where everything apart from the stage is dark it can stand out in a normal exhibition setting. It seems to work better when the black extends to the top and sides framing the layout.

 

Don

  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

BS10B25 Turtle on CF. 
Black drains all the colour out of a layout. 
 

Tim

  • Thanks 1
  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or more properly an absence of colour - which would be perfect in the circumstances.

 

Alex.

 

Edited by Alex Duckworth
words omitted.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Giles recommends black for off-stage areas, not fascias. The fact it drains all coulour out is and advantage there.

 

Jerry

  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On Freshwater (see above) the lighting/facia supports are black, and in a hall with dim lighting the facia appears to just float above the layout. The curtain is a nice Southern green.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a theatre the lights are on while people find there seats etc. then the lights are dimmed as the play/show starts which means you can focus on the lit up stage. One can hardly do that in a modelrailway show. Therefore unless you are in front of the layout  quite close the rest of the exhibition will be impinging on your view.  I think it is very much a personal choice whether you like a black fascia or some other colour. What I do find is with most layouts at exhibitions the quality of the modelling draws you in and I barely notice the fascia other than when viewing the layouts from a distance as I walk around.

 

Don

  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Gear Data Tables in the Yearbook state that 0.1 mm running clearance should be added to the theoretical M0.3 gear centres and 0.15 mm for the M0.4 gears. Is it correct to assume that 0.05 mm should be added for M0.2 gears?

Edited by Valentin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Valentin said:

The Gear Data Tables in the Yearbook state that 0.1 mm running clearance should be added to the theoretical M0.3 gear centres and 0.15 mm for the M0.4 gears. Is it correct to assume that 0.05 mm should be added for M0.2 gears?

 

Can you work to that degree of accuracy?

 

Don

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Donw said:

 

Can you work to that degree of accuracy?

 

Don

I doubt it. I needed it just for an accurate drawing. In real life I would use the gear meshing tool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Valentin said:

I doubt it. I needed it just for an accurate drawing. In real life I would use the gear meshing tool.

 

It is the sort of thing that is easier to feel than measure or see in my opinion.

 

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Etched slide chairs - how do you paint / darken them?

 

This seems perhaps a bit too obvious to ask, but how do you stop etched slide chair plates from shining through as bare metal on pointwork? 

 

Chemical blackening seems obvious, but I'm a little reticent to try on pointwork build in situ, as I wouldn't really be able to wash it off ... 

 

Justin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always use one of the Birchwood Casey "blues" - Super Blue, Aluminium Blue and Brass Black will all darken brass satisfactorily (the final resulting colour varies slightly but that isn't obvious on small items) providing that it is clean before the "blue" is applied. I apply it sparingly with a brush and I never bother to rinse it afterwards - and have never experienced any problems as a result - if I have accidentally applied too much liquid, I dab it with a bit of tissue. Indeed, I see one of the great benefits of these "blues" is the ability to reapply it readily to worn edges of completed models, a task which is difficult with paint.

 

I do have a small bottle of "blue", purchased at a Model Engineer exhibition perhaps half-a-century ago, which is labelled entirely in Italian and which I was warned needed to be thoroughly rinsed after application. The warning was well-founded, particularly for steel, where it quickly acts as a spectacular "grow your own rust" medium, so I only use it occasionally and for that very purpose. I have no real idea as to what it actually is although I have suspicions that it may have a cyanide base, consequently I only use it in a well ventilated area and I am very careful to keep it away from my skin. The Birchwood Casey "blues" though, need no more care than you would use for any chemical product.

  • Thanks 1
  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having done the wheel swap on my first diesel conversion I'm now at the point where I need to fit DG couplings to a Farish Class 24. What is the received wisdom on where to fit these, i.e. to mount them on the bogie or the body? 

The body would seem to be the obvious choice but I'd be interested to hear what people have to say. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, chrisveitch said:

Having done the wheel swap on my first diesel conversion I'm now at the point where I need to fit DG couplings to a Farish Class 24. What is the received wisdom on where to fit these, i.e. to mount them on the bogie or the body? 

The body would seem to be the obvious choice but I'd be interested to hear what people have to say. 

mine are body mounted and appear to work 

 

just to add I only use the latches not the whole coupling  / loop

 

Nick

Edited by nick_bastable
clarification
  • Agree 1
  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone know what Farish at Poole used to paint their die-cast locos?  I'm trying to strip a Jinty body back to bare metal. Even full strength dichloromethane "professional use only" paint stripper is taking ages to soften and loosen the paint.

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dunno, but I thought Nitromoors would do it - assuming the old formula is still around, or an old tin of the stuff.   Nitromoors plus a hot-air gun used to be my solution to really stubborn paint. 

 

Can you use the dichloromethane in a tub within the waterbath of an ultrasonic cleaner ?  Might work quicker. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a day of asking stupid questions I offer this one

 

Given the size of DJLC "layouts"  height  and size will probably  dictated  them been shown on a table,  given how low they will then  be is a proscenium arch a good idea ?

 

Nick

 

 

Edited by nick_bastable

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 2mmMark said:

Anyone know what Farish at Poole used to paint their die-cast locos?  I'm trying to strip a Jinty body back to bare metal. Even full strength dichloromethane "professional use only" paint stripper is taking ages to soften and loosen the paint.

 

Mark

 

I'm sure I've managed to strip a Jinty body using Nitromors (it was certainly more successful than the Dettol that someone recommended once!). Mind you, it might have been one of the early Bachmann locos made in China rather than a Poole original.

 

I've always been impressed with the quality of the Mazak castings that lurk under the paint of the early Farish locos. Some of them might be a dimensional nightmare, but they're a nicely cast dimensional nightmare.

 

Andy

Edited by 2mm Andy
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A short while back I had occasion to try and strip some paint and discovered that the current max strength Nitromors is nothing like it used to be (as with so much else these days) and I had to resort to getting the hot-air gun out.  Perhaps that or a quick blast with a blow-torch is the answer.

 

Izzy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 2mm Andy said:

 

I'm sure I've managed to strip a Jinty body using Nitromors (it was certainly more successful than the Dettol that someone recommended once!). Mind you, it might have been one of the early Bachmann locos made in China rather than a Poole original.

 

I've always been impressed with the quality of the Mazak castings that lurk under the paint of the early Farish locos. Some of them might be a dimensional nightmare, but they're a nicely cast dimensional nightmare.

 

Andy

Peter Farish was very proud of the new die casting machine that he bought on the back of the significant cash bonus arising from the Shredded Wheat contract.  The later Poole engines where well cast and were at least heavy. 
 

Tim 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Nigelcliffe said:

Dunno, but I thought Nitromoors would do it - assuming the old formula is still around, or an old tin of the stuff.   Nitromoors plus a hot-air gun used to be my solution to really stubborn paint. 

 

Can you use the dichloromethane in a tub within the waterbath of an ultrasonic cleaner ?  Might work quicker. 

 

 

 

Nitromors is no longer the old formulation and it's a lot weaker. The stuff I've got - Powerstrip - is identical to the old Nitromors.

 

I've now got the casting pretty clear of paint and as Andy says, it's really rather good.

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So here's the final result of my stripping (!).  Powerstrip softened the paint enough to be removed by gentle scraping. I have a feeling it might have been some form of epoxy based paint as these can be tough to remove.  Anyway, it's done now so I can start improving the body, stating with those dragster-wheel splashers!
20191119_103207_HDRa.jpg.8deb5ee1f3f125d02258a8334d37b87b.jpg20191119_103037_HDRa.jpg.ff151e5046bf11d01e1098cc60d4d7f2.jpg

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.