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I know you’re Scottish, Jim, but re-cycling tea bags... Times must be hard.  
 

Fag paper makes useful thin material  (don’t call it that in the US). 
 

Tim

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1 hour ago, CF MRC said:

I know you’re Scottish, Jim, but re-cycling tea bags... Times must be hard.  

It's all about reducing waste!  :nono:  One has to strive to be environmentally friendly!

 

I also have a reasonable supply of onion skin paper, salvaged from boxes of modelling wax.  It's ideal for use when soldering on crankpin washers etc.

 

Jim

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Thanks for the extra suggestions

 

I'm not a smoker so fag paper probably isn't an option but the till roll is a good idea - I have some of that and it is thinner than normal copy paper.

 

I've also saved some chocolate wrappers - there's some un-creased areas that are large enough so I will do some experimenting.

 

The sheet on your wash line looks very good  Jerry - just enough curvature to suggest a gentle breeze.

 

Best wishes

 

John

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1 hour ago, John Brenchley said:

Thanks for the extra suggestions

 

I'm not a smoker so fag paper probably isn't an option but the till roll is a good idea - I have some of that and it is thinner than normal copy paper.

 

I've also saved some chocolate wrappers - there's some un-creased areas that are large enough so I will do some experimenting.

 

The sheet on your wash line looks very good  Jerry - just enough curvature to suggest a gentle breeze.

 

Best wishes

 

John

I'm not a smoker either, you don't need to be to buy a pack. It has many uses such as insulation on locos when glued with runny Cyrano.

 

Jerry

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1 hour ago, Yorkshire Square said:

 

1*kzDkjH7dIaPGMcFsNFw8WQ.jpeg

 

:D:nea_mini::)

It's a fair cop - corrective text.....

Jerry

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Posted (edited)

Hello all! I have an inquiry about Lone star and their battery controllers in regards to battery boxes, what did most youngsters use to power their train sets when they had one of these, whats recommended/still available or available 2nd hand? I'm hoping to pick some of these online, I'm not sure if Treble-O-Lectric made something for it in particular or if you would have bought something separately, and NO i'm not referring to eBay, which is a hit and miss. I found a seller who is willing to sell some Treble - O - Lectric items to me and I'm super happy! I'm nearing my mid 20s but highly appreciate this classic system, ( I assume most of are in you are getting up in years... no offence, just happy I got some experience to talk to!)  thanks again!   

 

I don't care much for video games, ironically! but Dovetails Trains Sim comes to mind.... ;)

Edited by Max's Model Railway

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My latest chassis build now I have the motor mounting in place has an audible 'tick' noise, which I believe is coming from the worm/gear combination. I haven't sorted out the pick ups yet to actually run it on any track. Is closer meshing likely to be the answer?

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4 minutes ago, richbrummitt said:

My latest chassis build now I have the motor mounting in place has an audible 'tick' noise, which I believe is coming from the worm/gear combination. I haven't sorted out the pick ups yet to actually run it on any track. Is closer meshing likely to be the answer?

 

Could it be a lump or gouge on one tooth. The tick would go faster with the motor if so.

 

Don

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Another question is is it a single worm/wheel or is there a reduction as well? If there is, did that runs smoothly before the worm was in place?

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Posted (edited)

There is a spur reduction as well. This chassis ran previously with this worm but with a different motor and mounting.

Edited by richbrummitt

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What do people use to glaze their coaches? Microscope cover slides maybe? What thickness? Any suggestions for cutting? I guess they would easily score..

 

ty

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Posted (edited)

I bought some thin glass slides and a scorer to mark  the glass so it will break along the line. Not use in earnest yet.

 

Don

 

 

edit forgot to mention from CPL

Edited by Donw
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Glass is the best, thin coverslips being the easy source.   I've not found a scriber/scorer which is fine enough, so use the corner of a broken mini-drill grinding/cutting disc to score the glass. 

 

Nigel

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15 hours ago, garygfletcher said:

What do people use to glaze their coaches? Microscope cover slides maybe? What thickness? Any suggestions for cutting? I guess they would easily score..

 

ty

The best appearance for a top rate carriage is achieved with glass cover slips that are 170 um thick: they can be cut by scoring with a diamond point and then breaking against a steel edge.  However, they need a rebated support or they will be liable to crack - I use strips of thick etch with the cusp intact for this. This then increases the weight of the carriage which can quickly become an issue with mainline length trains.   It is very easy for etched carriage kits to become too heavy and so I tend to be a bit more pragmatic these days, better to use a lot of styrene for the structure. Clear plastic sheets are really quite effective enough: don’t forget that  the glass on a carriage would seldom be that clean. 
 

Tim

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I use acrylic sheet culled from packaging these days. The thickness can vary as with the tint, some seems clear while it can be greyish or blueish. But it's easy to cut and will fix in place with either cryno or d/s tape. Another advantage is that a whole coach side can be done in one go. This is the kind of thing. Trimmed to go around the handrails etc soldered into the sides. A Cravens 105 DMU. This used d/s tape for fixing.

321652777_RMwebglass01.jpg.5946b6b3a6796cadb4ab7e035775b758.jpg

1681629113_RMwebglass02.jpg.7e8fffaa2c6134161e59f32afd2c3bbb.jpg

 

Izzy

 

 

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Posted (edited)
On 15/04/2020 at 16:29, bécasse said:

Till receipts offer another possibility, there is usually enough white space for them to usable in 2FS and they are commendably thin and flat. "Weave" is far too fine to be visible in 2mm scale.

 

Thanks everyone who made suggestions about what to use to represent washing on a line.

In the end I went with some bits cut off the local supermarket till receipt

Some images of the end result are below - the wall and small tree are only placed in position so I removed the tree for one of the pictures so as to get a better view of the garden.

Rather cruel close ups but I'm happy with the effect from a more normal viewing distance.

 

 

P4240041_fixed.jpgP4240042.JPGP4240048 fixed.jpg

Edited by John Brenchley
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40 minutes ago, John Brenchley said:

 

Thanks everyone who made suggestions about what to use to represent washing on a line.

In the end I went with some bits cut off the local supermarket till receipt

Some images of the end result are below - the wall and small tree are only placed in position so I removed the tree for one of the pictures so as to get a better view of the garden.

Rather cruel close ups but I'm happy with the effect from a more normal viewing distance.

 

 

P4240041_fixed.jpgP4240042.JPGP4240048 fixed.jpg


I can’t see any pegs though ! :jester:

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9 minutes ago, Ian Smith said:


I can’t see any pegs though ! :jester:

 

What - you don't glue your washing out? 

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Really lovely!

 

Might I ask for the accepted wisdom on gravelly roads/goods yards? Looking at some prototype photos it looks quite fine and probably close to powdery in 2mm scale - so I wonder if a smooth surface suitably mottled with sponged-on paint and so on would be the best choice?

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I can’t see any pegs though !

 

Ok Ian, challenge accepted

 

I'll see what I can do

 

Best wishes

 

John

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4 hours ago, Lacathedrale said:

Really lovely!

 

Might I ask for the accepted wisdom on gravelly roads/goods yards? Looking at some prototype photos it looks quite fine and probably close to powdery in 2mm scale - so I wonder if a smooth surface suitably mottled with sponged-on paint and so on would be the best choice?

Most N gauge layouts grossly overdo the texture of road & platform surfaces in my opinion.  They should be very nearly smooth with texture derived from very fine powder such as pumice mixed with the emulsion paint. The surfaces should also be lighter than many people use, as the matt road surface will dry darker when the original emulsion / acrylic paint binder dries out clear. The old scouring powders  such as Ajax & Vin are a source of powders.  A good test is to put a scale figure next to the texture and see if the poor little person would tear ankle ligaments walking on the rough surface. 
 

Tim


 

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The very finest grade of wet and dry gives a good representation of tarmac or ash surface. The colour can be varied with dusts of powder colour or ground down pastels. That's what I used for the platform surface on Connorburn. 

 

Jim 

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Attwood Aggregates do a scenic dust in all their colours.  Sprinkled over wet paint it gives just enough of a hint of texture and if more (or variance) is required then scrapings of chalk pastel added to random areas.

 

Chris

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Posted (edited)

I had a similar problem building up the surface level flush with he rail top in Yeovil's coal yard, and have been pleasantly surprised by the effect of thickening Crown textured emulsion ("Suede") from B&Q  (you can get a small sampler tin) with talcum powder to a Tetrion-like consistency, and colouring the mix with Drawing Inks from WIndsor & Newton who do a wide range of colours (especially the black Indian Ink - you only need a drop at a time).  The variations in the colours in the photo below are the result of successive mixes (which all inevitably differed slightly in proportions) to skim up to the required level:

 

IMG_2432-1.JPG.187fe47e64c36a45e824bc91ebe7a6f5.JPG

 

Several ways to skin this cat, I suspect!

 

Laurie

 

PS  That's lovely washing (and the rest), John.  Hobby Holidays do 0.1mm diam NiS wire which is pretty close to the thickness of one leg of a clothes peg.  Just a thought.

 

 

Edited by Laurie2mil
Added PS
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