Jump to content
Pixie

Any Question Answered

Recommended Posts

Any recommendations for a spray tin of undercoat for some brass etches? I plan on using the phoenix precision paints, which are enamel. I’m also considering brushing the final coats instead of spraying. I do have a airbrush, but think it’s perhaps overkill? Appreciate any thoughts/guidance.

 

tia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Most rattle can primers are effective. Red oxide is always the best starting point for crimson lake. Brush painting will be hard put to match the finish achieved with an airbrush in 2mm scale. 
 

Tim

Edited by CF MRC
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found the Halfords cans to be good over the long term whatever you put on top, acrylic/enamel/cellulose. For doing just the odd coach at a time with top coat a gravity brush is handy as you don't need much paint really, just a few brush fulls into the top is often quite enough. Using cans for the top coat is an alternative, Ford or Rover Damask Red are the ones supposed to match. You do get a nice fairly hard finish which can take quite a bit of abuse before it gives up. It has to with me as I never use varnish except a very thinned wash over just the lining/transfers etc

 

Izzy

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I generally use Halfords rattle can primers for most things, but where there is fine detail, such as 3D printed items, I use Tamiya Fine Surface Primer spray cans.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Having bought our first house in January, I am now at the stage where I can think about a return to modelling, after several stalled projects. It won't be an immediate return - we have a large area of thick jungle to clear in the garden before a shed can be purchased and built, but we are desperate to be in a position to have that done by the end of the summer, pandemic allowing.

 

I have been modelling in 00, and primarily enjoy building over operation, particularly scenery (one of my scratchbuilt buildings ) . Recently I've found myself drawn to this sub forum more and more, thanks to some of the stunning work on show, and over the last couple of days have been wondering if I should dip a toe in the 2mm waters. I don't really have any 00 stock at present, aside from some kitbuilt (Cambrian) wagons all in need of repair after the move, so I wouldn't be losing out on essentially starting again. What does concern me, and would affect any move to finer standards, is my atrocious soldering skills. The last time I soldered a track feed, it took me close to an hour. I have seen Easitrac on the Association website which certainly seems easier, although I know I would have to bite the bullet at some point and learn how to solder properly (unless, he asks more in hope than expectation, such things as chassis and pointwork can safely be assembled with superglue?)

 

What I was planning to 'do' before these thoughts on change of scale/gauge was an immediately pre-WW1 'might have been' LBSCR branchline ('the plan' has a double slip, so it will need some revision if I'm being realistic!) , and as I have been collecting research material on this, I think I would stick with it. 

 

So; Would a good starting point be to order the 2mm Association 'Getting started' book and wagon kit and see how i go from there?

Edited by dseagull

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, dseagull said:

I...............What does concern me, and would affect any move to finer standards, is my atrocious soldering skills. The last time I soldered a track feed, it took me close to an hour. I have seen Easitrac on the Association website which certainly seems easier, although I know I would have to bite the bullet at some point and learn how to solder properly (unless, he asks more in hope than expectation, such things as chassis and pointwork can safely be assembled with superglue?)

................

So; Would a good starting point be to order the 2mm Association 'Getting started' book and wagon kit and see how i go from there?

 

Soldering.  You need to learn how, sorry no avoiding it.  But its not hard.  Would normally say "go to a group and get a demo/lesson", but with current situation that's out of question, so these key things:

 

1 - practise

2 - stuff has to be clean, so clean with fine abrasive immediately before soldering. Very fine wet&dry paper, Garyflex abrasive blocks, or (if those don't work) fibre-glass brush.

3 - correct solder, correct flux.   In general, most people find the old traditional lead-based solders much easier to handle than newer "lead free" stuff.   So recommend using the traditional type.

4 - adequately powerful iron.  Lots of people think "2mm = tiny soldering iron".  Wrong, you need a small tip, but lots of power to avoid the tip cooling down.  25W minimum, 50W temperature controlled is ideal.

 

 

 

Yes to the book and wagon kit.  And a few more books whilst you're at it.   If it really is your first go at an etched kit, then get two kits as there is a decent chance the first one won't go well, but if you can learn from what's gone wrong you can then do a decent job on the second example.   Whereas with only one which has gone wrong, all you get is disappointment. 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes get the Association book and wagon kit bundle. It will give you a taste of the scale at a modest cost.

 

There is not a lot of soldering needed for the pinned turnouts and  drop in wheels do not involve soldering. You would be best to learn how to solder somewhat whatever scale you choose to work in. Track feeds are not the easiest as the rail conducts the heat away. 2mm has a much finer rail which can help soldering. It is also much easier to file the rail to make point blades etc.  You will also find that practice will spend up the time it takes you to solder things. You will also find there is lots of help available on here. 

 

Don

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

just started writing this when Nigel replied.

 

i can only agree with all he says.  Soldering is not the 'black art' it is portrayed as by some people and Nigel gives you the basic essentials.  Start with some bits of metal to practice with.   PM me your address and i can send you lots of the edges from etch sheets, c10mm wide 10thou nickel silver, which will let you practice and make mistakes without ruining anything.  Once you get the hang of it you'll wonder what all the fuss was about.

 

Don has replied while I type this, so maybe I'm repeating what he has said.

 

Jim

Edited by Caley Jim
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dseagull said:

...What does concern me, and would affect any move to finer standards, is my atrocious soldering skills. The last time I soldered a track feed, it took me close to an hour. I have seen Easitrac on the Association website which certainly seems easier, although I know I would have to bite the bullet at some point and learn how to solder properly (unless, he asks more in hope than expectation, such things as chassis and pointwork can safely be assembled with superglue?)

 

What I was planning to 'do' before these thoughts on change of scale/gauge was an immediately pre-WW1 'might have been' LBSCR branchline ('the plan' has a double slip, so it will need some revision if I'm being realistic!) , and as I have been collecting research material on this, I think I would stick with it. 

 

So; Would a good starting point be to order the 2mm Association 'Getting started' book and wagon kit and see how i go from there?

 

There are, increasingly, ways to achieve much without soldering. I would agree with the 3 posts before mine that it is unlikely to be entirely avoidable though. What do you enjoy making (rather than operating): buildings, landscape, track...? If the latter then there is a skill to improve on (soldering) but the others do not necessitate soldering and it is possible to commission track to 2FS standards (see small suppliers section of 2mm association website under Keith Armes name). It is preferred by most, and indeed recommended, to solder etched kits like underframes but you may have success with glue. Given your choice of period and prototype you will have to either make or have made a lot of what you want to achieve.  You might be happy and able to have the things that you cannot do (solder) for yourself done on commission. I don't know if your branch line may only need some of the engines that are available ready to run in N and therefore 'convertible'. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many thanks for your comments - as I expected, really! It has been a few years since I tried soldering, so I will get some new equipment and give it a go (Jim, thanks for your kind offer - I will be in touch).

 

Starter park ordered and already on the way.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are a few nice LBSCR wagon bodies available on Shapeways as 3D prints which can be mounted on a suitable 2mm Scale Association chassis. When you have mastered soldering, Etched Pixels do some etched brass LBSCR carriage and wagon bodies - again using chassis and bogies from the 2mm Scale Association or David Eveleigh.

 

If you really cannot master building etched chassis kits, you can always carve up Peco N gauge chassis and drop in Association wheelsets, but once you see an Association chassis, you will not look at Peco in the same light again.

 

Here is Stroudley Open 'A' wagon as it comes, with just a spray of paint, nothing more. The carriage bodies are from Etched Pixels.

 

https://www.shapeways.com/product/6RMEAF4RA/2mmfs-lb-scr-stroudley-open-quot-a-quot

 

 

IMG_20200510_152638

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent, thanks Ian;

 

The Etched Pixels coaches require a 15' wheelbase chassis. I couldn't see any of these on the Association shop. Is there a particular one that could be modified, or are any close enough that the difference isn't noticeable?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, dseagull said:

The Etched Pixels coaches require a 15' wheelbase chassis. I couldn't see any of these on the Association shop. Is there a particular one that could be modified, or are any close enough that the difference isn't noticeable?

 

 

 

I used David Eveleigh etches for 18 foot GWR chassis for the Stroudleys, which do not have to be stretched like the 15' Peco ones. I created my own etch overlays to Brightonise them. I have some spare if you want them. I created 3D printed buffer beams and battery boxes (for Isle of Wight use) which are on Shapeways. Wheels and top hat bearings from the 2mm Scale Association.

 

Find the 18 foot chassis on Sheet 10 here:

 

http://www.2mm.org.uk/small_suppliers/davideveleigh/index.htm

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it's a bit of a heresy but I'd like to have a go at one of the Association Lowmac kits , can anyone suggest a way of wheeling it with 5.25 dia N gauge wheels Thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, graham63 said:

I know it's a bit of a heresy but I'd like to have a go at one of the Association Lowmac kits , can anyone suggest a way of wheeling it with 5.25 dia N gauge wheels Thank you

 

I've built the GER and GCR Macs. I used wheels from N Brass and carefully reamed them out to accept 2mm Association adaptor axles. I needed to do a little work with the Dremel to get enough clearance for the GCR Mac but otherwise things worked out fine.

213-180419120755.jpeg

213-210419111729.jpeg

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
  • Craftsmanship/clever 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Ian Morgan said:

 

I used David Eveleigh etches for 18 foot GWR chassis for the Stroudleys, which do not have to be stretched like the 15' Peco ones. I created my own etch overlays to Brightonise them. I have some spare if you want them. I created 3D printed buffer beams and battery boxes (for Isle of Wight use) which are on Shapeways. Wheels and top hat bearings from the 2mm Scale Association.

 

Find the 18 foot chassis on Sheet 10 here:

 

http://www.2mm.org.uk/small_suppliers/davideveleigh/index.htm

 

 

 

Thanks Ian, very useful to know. I was looking at the Billinton coaches, but it is some way off at present! There is also a rather nice Horsebox I've seen on Shapeways which appeals. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, dseagull said:

 

Thanks Ian, very useful to know. I was looking at the Billinton coaches, but it is some way off at present! There is also a rather nice Horsebox I've seen on Shapeways which appeals. 

 

I'm a big fan of horse boxes could you post a link please?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dseagull, you might also be interested in this 2mmFS layout topic:

 

 

 

  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Atso said:

 

I've built the GER and GCR Macs. I used wheels from N Brass and carefully reamed them out to accept 2mm Association adaptor axles. I needed to do a little work with the Dremel to get enough clearance for the GCR Mac but otherwise things worked out fine.

213-180419120755.jpeg

213-210419111729.jpeg

 

But we need to see them the other way up!

 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, graham63 said:

I know it's a bit of a heresy but I'd like to have a go at one of the Association Lowmac kits , can anyone suggest a way of wheeling it with 5.25 dia N gauge wheels Thank you

Hi

 

I’ve done this using Parkside Dundas 5.1mm dia wheels by shortening the axle to 12.25mm. You can do it with the axles sold for Farish wheels but you need to be careful to get the wheels square on the axle.

 

C13FD47D-DBED-4E73-A9BD-CA177793A9AB.jpeg.3aad7925b9740e5c8cc72ed21c65565b.jpeg

 

Cheers

 

Paul

Edited by PaulCheffus
Add image
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the information very helpful I have no excuse for not having a go now

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Further to my previous question(s), the starter pack has now arrived, and enthusiasm remains high! - was very impressed with the 'Getting Started' book which explains things very well, my compliments to those involved in its creation.

 

One more if I may; Would this - https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07Q4T12PH/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A2NRY4HOWAHJOF&psc=1 - be a suitable soldering iron/set to get me started?

 

Thanks

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dseagull said:

Further to my previous question(s), the starter pack has now arrived, and enthusiasm remains high! - was very impressed with the 'Getting Started' book which explains things very well, my compliments to those involved in its creation.

 

One more if I may; Would this - https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07Q4T12PH/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A2NRY4HOWAHJOF&psc=1 - be a suitable soldering iron/set to get me started?

 

Thanks

 

 


The iron itself will probably work, but probably more important are the flux and solder. Don’t use lead free solder. It’s technically healthier, but does not stick nearly as well as leaded solder. I’d avoid rosin/flux core solder as well. Get some liquid flux, Carr’s yellow or green are popular, dilute phosphoric acid works well too and is cheaper. Use a small paintbrush to apply it. When you’re done soldering for the session, wash the parts. Soap and water with an old toothbrush. Otherwise the flux will cause corrosion. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.