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14 hours ago, Caley Jim said:

As far as I'm aware, stainless steel won't solder at all, to anything, unless you have specialist flux, and even then its not a simple operation.

 

Jim

 

I sometimes use a bolt to hold the nut in place (with lots of oil/graphite/whatever to try and keep solder out of the thread) and sometimes end up soldering everything solid :(

 

A S/S bolt would probably be great for this.

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3 hours ago, Nigelcliffe said:

 

Gosh, metric are expensive.  Or that supplier is expensive. 

 

A very quick search, and 12BA brass nuts at £4 for 50 came up at the first half-credible supplier I found.  

 

Several years ago, I bought a few thousand screws and nuts in sizes 8BA to 14BA, divvying them up with various modelling friends, so we all had packets of hundreds of each size.     

 

- Nigel

 

 

The supplier no doubt. I have a German source who are much cheaper. https://ghw-modellbau.de/

 

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Crosland said:

 

I sometimes use a bolt to hold the nut in place (with lots of oil/graphite/whatever to try and keep solder out of the thread) and sometimes end up soldering everything solid :(

 

A S/S bolt would probably be great for this.

If you chemically black the item then it won’t take solder.  A useful way to anti-flux small items. 
 

Tim

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6 hours ago, Crosland said:

 

I sometimes use a bolt to hold the nut in place (with lots of oil/graphite/whatever to try and keep solder out of the thread) and sometimes end up soldering everything solid :(

 

A S/S bolt would probably be great for this.

 

You can still jam it with solder in the nut threads.   See the folks who talk about soldering crankpins into the back of the new 3D printed 2mm driving wheels.  Those are 3D printed in stainless steel.....

 

There are tricks to soldering a nut onto a model.  A cocktail stick will take a temporary thread for holding most small nuts, and soldering a cocktail stick is really hard.....

 

 

- Nigel

 

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1 hour ago, Nigelcliffe said:

See the folks who talk about soldering crankpins into the back of the new 3D printed 2mm driving wheels.  Those are 3D printed in stainless steel.....

 

I'll see them weep bitter tears when they subsequently fit a return crank for some yummy outside valve gear. Then I'll offer to lend them my T-Shirt...

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29 minutes ago, MrSimon said:

Haha yep I found that trying to solder a balance weight on...  what’s the best way to solder things onto the new wheels (next time)?

With glue?

(Loctite for the crank pins and Araldite for the balance weights)

Edited by Nick Mitchell
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Just asking some questions about coach lining, having used pressfix transfer lining when modelling in 4mm finescale, is transfer lining in 2mm worth thinking about or just too fiddly? Would it worth considering using a bow pen or is there anything else worth considering. 
any ideas, warmly received. 

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Many tasks in 2mm are fiddly by definition. Whether or not something is too fiddly is a question only you can answer.

Others have demonstrated that transfers and bow pens are both viable - as are Rotring-type tubular pens.

I haven't lined a 2mm coach myself yet, but have drawn inspiration from this thread.

 

 

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1 hour ago, 1965Nick said:

Just asking some questions about coach lining, having used pressfix transfer lining when modelling in 4mm finescale, is transfer lining in 2mm worth thinking about or just too fiddly? Would it worth considering using a bow pen or is there anything else worth considering. 
any ideas, warmly received. 

I've used Fox transfers to line all my coaches. It's very fiddly and I used LMS yellow/black/yellow lining with the 2 outer lines trimmed off. Seems to do the job.

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3 hours ago, Nick Mitchell said:

Many tasks in 2mm are fiddly by definition. Whether or not something is too fiddly is a question only you can answer.

Others have demonstrated that transfers and bow pens are both viable - as are Rotring-type tubular pens.

I haven't lined a 2mm coach myself yet, but have drawn inspiration from this thread.

 

 

And a very interesting thread it turned out to be! 

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2 hours ago, Gareth Collier said:

I've used Fox transfers to line all my coaches. It's very fiddly and I used LMS yellow/black/yellow lining with the 2 outer lines trimmed off. Seems to do the job.

1849439989_portrait5008.JPG.438811c287b55c0ee51ad361c575f2c4.JPG

2103680914_portrait5010.JPG.f226ca14035d2eb4c4db4931e033671a.JPG

Impressive work

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Anybody got any recommendations for a supplier for head code labels / transfers for a Dapol 33 supporting 2 character route codes.  It is the early BR green model and I am looking to fit the headcode 1D.  It is to be backlit from the fitted lights.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I have a sticky query, or is it a query about sticking!  As a result of my possessing 10 thumbs I have managed to snap a very small corner off of a 3D printed coach roof.  As usual, the carpet fairies have sneaked the broken bit away.  The sequence of repair I am considering is to carefully square up the break, let in a small piece of plastic strip of suitable size and, carefully, trim to match.  The size of the repair needed is approx 1.5 mm square.  The question is, which adhesive is safe to use?  The material is, I believe, FUD and I have no clue as to how this reacts to, for example, poly glue or cyano.  I have no wish to end up with a blob of melted FUD!

 

Thanks in anticipation.

 

John

 

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I use 1.5-2mm if I’m using plasticard, but usually it’s scraps of Rowley mountboard and I glue the top layers of plasticard on top of that:

 

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I’ll then use a bit of bracing and internal floors to keep it square, but it depends what you’re building as to the best solution.  
Hope that helps?

Simon

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17 hours ago, Doncaster Green said:

I have a sticky query, or is it a query about sticking!  As a result of my possessing 10 thumbs I have managed to snap a very small corner off of a 3D printed coach roof.  As usual, the carpet fairies have sneaked the broken bit away.  The sequence of repair I am considering is to carefully square up the break, let in a small piece of plastic strip of suitable size and, carefully, trim to match.  The size of the repair needed is approx 1.5 mm square.  The question is, which adhesive is safe to use?  The material is, I believe, FUD and I have no clue as to how this reacts to, for example, poly glue or cyano.  I have no wish to end up with a blob of melted FUD!

 

Thanks in anticipation.

 

John

 

 

I think cyano will be fine. However, if you are worried, test with a small drop of the glue on the invisible underside of the roof to check things do not get dissolved away.

 

Chris

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On 16/02/2021 at 21:52, 1965Nick said:

Hi, I know Bill Bedford marketed some reductions of his 4mm scale coach etches, where they to n gauge or 2mm scale? 

 

They were to 2mm scale, sadly with the emphasis on were.

 

Simon

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