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I'm interested in how you went about fitting thrust bearings, do you have any photographs of how you set them up please?

 

At this point the B4 is still in bits pending resurrection. I've just not had time to rebuild the poor beastie.

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I'm coming to the conclusion that Easitrac straights and curves with N turnouts is the best option. The only thing putting me off complete 2mm is the conversion of steam locos. I know of the wheel re-profiling service, but this or replacing the driving wheels seems to be a major undertaking. Am I correct?

 

If I go for the mixed solution, can I use Association jigs and construct Easitrac using an N roller gauge?

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The only thing putting me off complete 2mm is the conversion of steam locos. I know of the wheel re-profiling service, but this or replacing the driving wheels seems to be a major undertaking. Am I correct?

If you go down the wheel re-profiling route the only problem might be getting the wheels out from the loco to start with then getting them back in, there are some locos where this is tricky, the Ixion manor is one. Replacing the drivers at the moment also means a new chassis which is an undertaking.

 

I'm coming to the conclusion that Easitrac straights and curves with N turnouts is the best option. ...... If I go for the mixed solution, can I use Association jigs and construct Easitrac using an N roller gauge?

 

For the plain trackwork there is no need to re-gauge as n gauge stock will run happily on the providing you have newer wheelsets.

Are you talking about using peco pointwork or building your own using easitrack components? If you are intending to make you own pointwork then some of the jigs can be used. The one that springs to mind that would not work is the assembly jig as this creates flangeways that are too narrow for n gauge.

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As Kris alluded; you can use the filing jigs, but the assembly jigs would be wrong.

 

However if you speak to the right people nicely and tell them your requirements it is possible to get custom jigs made to suit your purpose.

 

The jigs are not strictly necessary, however they do make things easier. If you have 9mm button gauges and N roller gauges it is possible to make N gauge points with easitrac components.

Edited by richbrummitt

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A batch of crossing assembly jigs for N gauge standards was produced - they were available from Noel Leaver, but I have no idea if he has any left.

 

Andy

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Thank you, that was just what I was wanting to hear.

 

I am still at the planning stage. First I have to paint the spare bedroom, then give my son a proper 00 layout. Then I can clear and paint one of the cellar rooms and put an N-gauge in there for me.

 

By that time I should have learnt how to make turnouts to an acceptable quality.

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Don't mean to be dim but.. When soldering decoders in to locos this one is my DBS 66 how do you clean the flux up that maybe left on the board? obviously not in the sink with toothbrush and Cif!

Tom

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The flux in cored solder is non-corrosive, so doesn't need to be cleaned up afterwards. If that is not sufficient, used something like Carr's orange flux which is non-corrosive.

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You don't use the same flux and solder for electrical wiring as you might use for etched kit construction.

 

Electrical/electronic multi-cored solder should make a good joint without flux.

 

Note that you should not mix Lead-free solder with Lead-based solder. Use one or the other, and keep soldering iron tips separate for each type. In general, Lead-based solders melt and flow at lower temperatures and seem to have better understanding in the hobby community. All commercially purchased electronics will now be lead-free, so if trying to make a joint onto an existing board it needs to be lead-free.

 

 

- Nigel

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Thanks AM, trip to Maplins at lunch then! :)

 

Thanks also for that Nigel, I will get some more tips whilst I am down there.. I hadn't realised you shouldn't mix solders..

 

Regards

Tom

Edited by backofanenvelope

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Could I ask a new question as I'm building my first 2mm scale loco and I've met a snag. It's about the 2mm SA loco drivers and crankpins.

How does one fit the turned brass crankpins into the drivers?

The head of the crankpin sticks out from back of driver so do I countersink the hole, or file the head down? And if the latter do I do it before or after fixing in the wheel?

Also how do I fix the crankpin in the driver? With glue or solder?

Many thanks for any advice,

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Could I ask a new question as I'm building my first 2mm scale loco and I've met a snag. It's about the 2mm SA loco drivers and crankpins.

How does one fit the turned brass crankpins into the drivers?

The head of the crankpin sticks out from back of driver so do I countersink the hole, or file the head down? And if the latter do I do it before or after fixing in the wheel?

 

Are these plain (3-106) or flanged (3-107)? I've only ever used the latter. They have always been a nice sliding fit up to the point where the flange meets the spoked face.

 

Also how do I fix the crankpin in the driver? With glue or solder?

 

I've done both. I was advised not to linger with the iron if soldering, I presume because there is a risk of disturbing the tyre. Gluing with epoxy also proved successful. Using superglue will stink when you heat the crankpin later to solder the retaining washer for the rods.

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Are these plain (3-106) or flanged (3-107)? I've only ever used the latter. They have always been a nice sliding fit up to the point where the flange meets the spoked face.

 

I've done both. I was advised not to linger with the iron if soldering, I presume because there is a risk of disturbing the tyre. Gluing with epoxy also proved successful. Using superglue will stink when you heat the crankpin later to solder the retaining washer for the rods.

 

Thanks for your help. I have 3-106 that have a head 0.5mm high so they stick out of the back of the wheel quite a bit. Sounds like I have bought the wrong crankpins! Maybe I should get some 3-107, I guess the flange goes at the front on these too saving having a washer. Are they soldered from behind also?

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I guess the flange goes at the front on these too saving having a washer. Are they soldered from behind also?

 

I believe that's the idea (well, that's how I've used them, anyway!). They can be soldered from behind.

 

Andy

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Hi. Beginner help again, I'm afraid. Can anyone suggest the ideal weights for different types of rolling stock? I'm sure there must be benefit in running if all 4-wheel wagons weigh the same, for instance, but I can't find any references to it in handbook etc. Should it vary with wheelbase, or number of axles?

Ian

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I've only ever seen the NMRA guidlines quoted, and I'm sorry I can't remember what they are.

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Thanks for the link; pity I work in metric! I want to equalise the weights in my small current fleet of wagons before doing any serious testing of the track I've just finished laying. It's all getting a bit scary..........

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.15 ounce is 4.25g.

.5 ounce is 14.2g

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Going by NRMA standards yes. I've never been convinced at how relevant these are for UK models as US stuff is mainly bogied.

 

I've just weighed 3 2mm open wagons, 2 are 5g each and the 3rd was only 4g. I wonder if they would be any better if they were heavier?

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Thanks for the help with this. I've just finished laying track on board 1 of my layout and had a first testing session last night. I have a Farish class 24 and 3 rewheeled wagons, 1 of which is lighter than the other 2. First results showed the 2 heavier ones running much better through the turnouts than the light one, which is what prompted the query. The lighter one is also longer wheelbase. I'll weigh them now and see what happens..........of course, the problem may be the quality of my track construction, though after building 11 turnouts in situ on the board I do feel as though I've improved a little as I've gone along!!

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I just weighed one of my coaches, that's somewhat over weight tipping the scales at a little over 50g but it does run nicely. I shall have to see about feeding the open wagons up in some way. That's a job for the future though first job must be to finish relaying the fiddle yard.

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I just weighed one of my coaches, that's somewhat over weight tipping the scales at a little over 50g but it does run nicely.

 

Would this be a Masterclass Models etched kit? I remember discussing at Newbury how heavy you thought they came out.

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It would. One of the 70 footers.

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It would make sense for the length to be a factor basing it on x grams per ft of the prototype. In 0 gauge I weighted wagons up to 4--5 oz (approx 120grams) I have yet to do so in 2mm . One suitable approach is to weigh your heaviest (usually a cast wm kit) and make half of that the minimum weight. That way the cast vehicles will not be excessive.

Don

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