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What to use for corrugated iron? - is any 2mm plasticard available? or any better solutions?

 

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Russ,

 

For the above I used Wills plasticard sheet for the body of the building and the roof/door from "Campbell Scale Models Corrugated Aluminum" (Part 200-804 http://www.mainlinehobby.com/catpages/CSM.shtml). Granted the aluminium isn't cheap, but it looks great.

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What to use for corrugated iron? - is any 2mm plasticard available? or any better solutions?

 

Slaters do 2mm corrugated plasticard.

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Julia's solution is probably the neatest. I use heavy grade tin foil and an old coffee pot lid which has fine serations around it. The foil is taped at one end to the lid and the corrogations scribed on with a cocktail stick. The roof for the screens at Highbury were done this way.

 

post-1074-0-22712500-1320743102_thumb.jpg

 

Jerry

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Hi,

I have a question, does anybody know how to scratchbuild multiple working jumper cables and sockets so that i could then fit them to my Farish class 50?

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Are they similar to vacuum pipes? These I bend up on a jig from suitable sized wire.

 

There are methods of making more detailed versions in 'Loco bits and pieces' by the late Mr Wright.

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I'm certain that someone does a set of whitemetal castings for Class 50 jumpers - have you tried TPM? For the cables themselves I would use black EZ Line - from Model Junction in Slugh.

 

Alan

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I'm certain that someone does a set of whitemetal castings for Class 50 jumpers - have you tried TPM? For the cables themselves I would use black EZ Line - from Model Junction in Slugh.

 

Alan

 

Thanks guys. Will check out TPM's website.

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Hi there,

 

I wonder is anyone could point me in the direction of 2mm scale custom nameplates (if such a thing exists?)

 

The name is quite obscure ("Rhondda") so I asume a custom service is the only option...

 

Many thanks in advance

 

Paul A.

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Hi there,

 

I wonder is anyone could point me in the direction of 2mm scale custom nameplates (if such a thing exists?)

 

The name is quite obscure ("Rhondda") so I asume a custom service is the only option...

 

Many thanks in advance

 

Paul A.

 

A common solution for nameplates is to approach one of the designers of etched kits and ask for your nameplate to be put onto their next test-etch. Cost should be pretty low as the area of etch is tiny.

 

- Nigel

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I've had 2mm nameplates produced by Guilplates in the past.

 

Simon

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I don't know whether this is the right place to ask but since the topic is "Any Question Answered" I'll ask here...

 

What weight do people usually make their 2mm FS wagons and coaches? I have so far made 4 wagons, but have only put a little lead under 2 of them, and wondered what weight I sould be aiming at per axle?

 

Thanks in advance,

Ian

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My wagons are mostly plasticard bodies on Association etched chassis, and I put a 10mm square piece of lead flashing in the underframe. This gives the wagon a bit of weight and seems to help them roll ok. I'm not sure what the actual weight is; must stick them on the scales!

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Ian -

NMRA recommends 0.5 ounces, plus 0.15 ounces per inch length, for n gauge - see http://www.nmra.org/standards/sandrp/rp-20_1.html

 

I am not convinced that these weights would be appropriate for our circumstances, as I assume they are intended for long bogie freightcars, rather than short 4-wheel wagons.

 

Assuming that weight should scale with volume, then 1 gram of 2mm wagon weight represents about 3 tons of full-size wagon weight. The NMRA recommendation would be about 0.7 ounces, or 20 grams, which appears to be equivalent to about 65 tons (against about 5 to 15 tons for the prototype).

 

I am still procrastinating on adding weight to my own rolling stock, but from limited testing it does seem to run better with a little more weight (etched bodies better than plastic ones). Kitchen scales used for weighing the wagons, so accuracy is very questionable, but I think my heavier wagons are about half the NMRA recommendation, and lighter ones about a quarter.

 

Need some proper track, and a working locomotive, before I can offer any useful advice from personal experience.

 

David

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Hi 2mm Fans,

 

My question is:

 

Where do you get detailing parts from for locomotives, I need a source for everything from chimneys to buffers, safety valves etc for GWR loco's

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Where do you get detailing parts from for locomotives, I need a source for everything from chimneys to buffers, safety valves etc for GWR loco's

Nick Tilson's N Brass Locomotives is probably a good place to start - http://www.nbrasslocos.co.uk/GWRfit.html

 

Another possibility is Dean SIdings, which produces a couple of GWR kits (0-6-0 ST and '517 0-4-2T) and may be able/willing to provide the fittings separately - unfortunately no web site available. Limited details at http://www.ukmodelshops.co.uk/suppliers/40069-Dean_Sidings

 

David

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What weight do people usually make their 2mm FS wagons and coaches? I have so far made 4 wagons, but have only put a little lead under 2 of them, and wondered what weight I sould be aiming at per axle?

 

Hello Ian. Have a look at the previous page of this thread, there are some thoughts on weight there.

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Hello Ian. Have a look at the previous page of this thread, there are some thoughts on weight there.

 

Kris,

 

Thanks for that, I never thought that someone might have asked the same question :O

Ian

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If I go for 2mm, will I have problems with radii and gradients? - I presume these are more restrictive than with 9mm.

 

My main area will have a helix with 18 inch radius. With 4.5cm between levels (which is what I reckon I can get away with) that gives me a gradient of 1.5%. The rest of it will have sweeping curves. I intend to have the odd long train (say 40 PO wagons or ten carriages). Setting is 1934. Is this practical?

 

My secondary route, for a few small wagons and 0-6-0 only, will have a tight radius but will be level. What minimum radius will I be able to get away with?

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If I go for 2mm, will I have problems with radii and gradients? - I presume these are more restrictive than with 9mm.

 

My main area will have a helix with 18 inch radius. With 4.5cm between levels (which is what I reckon I can get away with) that gives me a gradient of 1.5%. The rest of it will have sweeping curves. I intend to have the odd long train (say 40 PO wagons or ten carriages). Setting is 1934. Is this practical?

 

My secondary route, for a few small wagons and 0-6-0 only, will have a tight radius but will be level. What minimum radius will I be able to get away with?

 

18" is probably the absolute minimum you could get away with, and on a gradient - well I would try out a test. I don't think there are any layouts out there that have this combination. 24" radius would be better.

 

Chris

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I was afraid of that. Time to file away my current plan as Peco-55 and dig out my old 00 plan as a basis for the 2mm option.

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Even in N gauge if you have tight radii on gradients it will affect haulage. Ther are two factors one is the radius a vehicle can negotiate without binding, the other is the fact that if a train is longer than 1/4 of a circle the forces will be causing drag where the wheels are pulled against the rail by the time the train is 1/2 of a circle its two ends are going in different directions and the drag would be noticeable. At 18in radius a half circle would be beween 4ft6in and 5ft. The 10 coach train could be about the same length an a 40wagon trains a bit longer.

Whether your locos could pull them us gradients round those bends depends on how free running your stock is and how much weight can be got into the locos (assuming the motor is powerful enough). Diesels may have more run for weighting than steam locos particularly earlier locos. You could adopt the Midland policy and go in for double heading.

Obviously 24in radius will reduce the chances of problems getting round tight curves and reduce the drag

Don

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Hi everyone, I've got a few questions.

 

 

Am I right or wrong in understanding that standard Farish/Dapol/Peco stock is too small to fit on 2mm finescale track and stock converted for 2mm finescale is too large for Peco track?

 

I have a few ideas for small projects and would like to try 2mm finescale but would like to use the same stock for these as well as my current N gauge layouts.

 

Secondly, if I do go finescale, can I make the handmade turnouts match the Peco streamline ones?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Matt.

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