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Chris Higgs

Etched loco chassis

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Despite being out of period for what I would like to portray I have succumbed to the offer of a 2251 bodyshell. Those that did likewise will also need a tender.

 

I have whitemetal tenders from Langley, P&D Marsh and GEM kits but none of them posses the fidelity that an etched one could/should/would have. It might be a plausible proposition for one of the greats in 4mm to reduce one of their kits, or a stand alone kit in 2.06mm, if there is enough demand.

I'd join you in this with order for two etches al least but only if 2mm not 2.06mm!! Sorry about that Richard. The relative standardisation of GWR tenders is very useful for modellers I always think.

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Despite being out of period for what I would like to portray I have succumbed to the offer of a 2251 bodyshell. Those that did likewise will also need a tender.

 

I have whitemetal tenders from Langley, P&D Marsh and GEM kits but none of them posses the fidelity that an etched one could/should/would have. It might be a plausible proposition for one of the greats in 4mm to reduce one of their kits, or a stand alone kit in 2.06mm, if there is enough demand.

 

An etched GWR tender is already in the pipeline. Could be a long pipeline though

 

Chris

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An etched GWR tender is already in the pipeline. Could be a long pipeline though

 

Chris

 

About how long? Weeks, months or years?

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An etched GWR tender is already in the pipeline. Could be a long pipeline though

 

Chris

 

To avoid possible duplication if I decide to get my finger out, which diagram(s) would it cover.

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They are not close to 2mm scale. The etches are specifically designed to convert the proprietory bodies. That means they all have exact wheel spacings for 1:148 (except for the 4F which is a conversion chassis for the Raithby etched kit, so it is to 2FS).

 

 

Chris,

 

What are you including on the 4F etch? Will it include a new replacement tender chassis? Also is this the etch which is currently listed as being for the Farish 4F on the 2mm website?

 

Thanks,

 

Simon

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Chris,

 

What are you including on the 4F etch? Will it include a new replacement tender chassis? Also is this the etch which is currently listed as being for the Farish 4F on the 2mm website?

 

Thanks,

 

Simon

 

The chassis is just the same as the others, but it includes etched sandboxes as the shape is amenable to an etched foldup box. There is a tender chassis, it's just the inside frames and brakegear ie. not the outside frames which you can use from the Raithby kit. No castings are included in any of the chassis.

 

This is the chassis listed for the Farish 4F but the website is WRONG. Its not suitable for the Farish 4F at all

 

Chris.

Edited by Chris Higgs

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The etched chassis are a big step forward for 2mm modellers - really appreciated.

 

A couple of points though - would it be possible to list the actual wheelbases of the kits, as not everyone knows much about the Farish models or the specific locos and might wish to use the chassis for something else.

 

Also, I assume we have to buy the kit then read the instructions to work out what gears etc we need to order. It would be great help if the list of components could be shown on-line so we can order everything all at once.

 

I appreciate this is a lot of extra work for someone and time is very valuable, but the net result would be less work for everyone, including the shopkeepers.

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There are some files on the 2mm 'VAG' showing the gear arrangements for the new chassis and diagrams of the etch (what you get for your money if you like!) as well as a list of the other components required. Chris and others are working on a way of putting the instructions on-line without running up a huge bill for bandwidth.

 

Andy

Edited by 2mm Andy

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There are some files on the 2mm 'VAG' showing the gear arrangements for the new chassis and diagrams of the etch (what you get for your money if you like!) as well as a list of the other components required. Chris and others are working on a way of putting the instructions on-line without running up a huge bill for bandwidth.

 

Andy

 

I have put the draft instructions online at

 

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B7V9MIj3SLTgYTZkZGM1NDEtZTQxNi00ZGM5LTg5ZDUtMGU\

3NGY0NWI0MDM1

 

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B7V9MIj3SLTgNmZhNzNkZjItYmY0MC00YjI2LTk2ODYtZGZ\

hNTUzYTIzNTZh

 

Chris

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Chris,

 

Is there likely to be a drawing for the rear-axle drive 57xx ? I can't see one in the VAG files.

 

David

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Chris,

 

Is there likely to be a drawing for the rear-axle drive 57xx ? I can't see one in the VAG files.

 

David

 

Will be there in a couple of minutes. But this is very much an advanced option. There is a bunch of body hacking to be done in this configuration, and to be frank, really needs a new etched (or scratchbuilt) footplate like Julia did to do it justice.

 

Chris

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Hi. I have been looking at the instructions mentioned above by Chris, and am forming the opinion that one of these chassis would be the best place to start for a complete beginner to loco construction. The Tweed Dock branch was worked by J77 0-6-0 tanks as the only permitted locos over the route. My version, based on the original NER plans, would have had greater availability of locos, and the 1950s setting makes the J94 an ideal candidate as my first steam loco for the layout. Having decided that I'd leave loco building for a period while developing my skills laying track, wiring, scenery construction etc, I guess it's now time to take a deep breath and have a go.........would the J94 with etched chassis be a good place to start?

 

Ian

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I think you've answer your own question there Ian. :-) Given the standard of your layout I don't think that you need have any fears about loco construction. Having built up a class 11 that uses a similar method of construction I can confirm that it does work nicely for a novice.

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Thanks Chris......though the stuff I've been doing doesn't come close to the precision engineering I've seen on here. I'm going to get one and give it a try; my biggest worry is that I get bogged down with it and it brings the layout progress to a grinding halt. Of course,if someone were to start a thread like the group wagon kit building thread, but about the J94.......... :) :)

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You might see some photos and text on how to blunder through the construction of the 57xx chassis from me.

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I'll look forward to it........simple and step-by-step would be good :) though the instructions Chris has produced look outstandingly helpful.

 

Ian

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Ian,

 

Judging by your progress with the layout, I'd say that you really shouldn't have any problems. If you are uncertain about anything, post a question on here or bring the chassis to one of the North East Area Group meetings - there will always be someone there to offer help and advice.

 

I've got a couple of the 03/04 chassis on order, and have a Farish J94 in the gloat box, so no doubt I'll get around to doing that one in due course.

 

Andy

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I reckon that since you have laid track and are undertaking scenic work (I can't see any wiring on your thread) it could be time for a locomotive.They really are not too difficult to get together. Until you try you'll never learn :locomotive:

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Thanks for the advice. I'll be giving it a go and Andy, the NEAG will certainly be asked for advice if I get stuck!!

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Hi. I have been looking at the instructions mentioned above by Chris, and am forming the opinion that one of these chassis would be the best place to start for a complete beginner to loco construction. The Tweed Dock branch was worked by J77 0-6-0 tanks as the only permitted locos over the route. My version, based on the original NER plans, would have had greater availability of locos, and the 1950s setting makes the J94 an ideal candidate as my first steam loco for the layout. Having decided that I'd leave loco building for a period while developing my skills laying track, wiring, scenery construction etc, I guess it's now time to take a deep breath and have a go.........would the J94 with etched chassis be a good place to start?

 

Ian

 

The intention was that these chassis would make it as easy as it can be made - although that still might not be easy enough for some! The J94, although obviously not state of the art as far as RTR bodies go, or even properly to scale, is a nice heavy thing which should help the running qualities. And fairly spacious inside for the motor, DCC chip and whatever. Not to mention fairly easy to pick up bodies only at good prices on ebay. Some of the other locos are much more difficult to get hold of. But if I was pushed to choose a body which will produce a good looking and running model without major mods I would probably go for the Jinty.

 

The problem with leaving loco building to last, is that a layout without locos is, well just a diorama. Unless you are just going to run diesels.

 

Chris

Edited by Chris Higgs

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The intention was that these chassis would make it as easy as it can be made - although that still might not be easy enough for some! The J94, although obviously not state of the art as far as RTR bodies go, or even properly to scale, is a nice heavy thing which should help the running qualities. And fairly spacious inside for the motor, DCC chip and whatever. Not to mention fairly easy to pick up bodies only at good prices on ebay. Some of the other locos are much more difficult to get hold of. But if I was pushed to choose a body which will produce a good looking and running model without major mods I would probably go for the Jinty.

 

The problem with leaving loco building to last, is that a layout without locos is, well just a diorama. Unless you are just going to run diesels.

 

Chris

 

Thanks for that Chris. It'll be the J94. If a Jinty appeared on the Tweed Dock branch I wouldn't be able to sleep at night.......

 

In the intro to my layout thread I explained about loco building: I need to develop my skills first, and spending months struggling to get a loco running before building the layout would not have been good motivation. I have the track down, wired, uncouplers working, DCC, a Farish 24 and fifteen wagons. It all works, so I can play trains whenever I fancy a change. It's not a diorama, believe me! I'm getting to the point where I feel ready to try a loco conversion. My ultimate aim is to have home-made scratchbuilt tender locos running on the B, TD and S branch. Given the amount I've got done in the last 6 months, I feel I've done it the right way round......for me, anyway, and that's what matters, I guess.

It's thanks to your work and that of the Easitrac consortium and others of similar mind that 2mm FS has become accessible to people like me.....a big thank you!!

Cheeky question: if I did the design work, would you be able to produce an etch of fishing boat parts, or is that sacrilegeous?

 

Ian

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Guest Natalie Graham

Ian, there's no reason why you should spend months struggling to get a loco running. Given the range of parts the Association supplies, as long as you can drill holes and solder you can build a working chassis, especially something straightforward like an inside cylinder 0-6-0 which isn't going to have balance issues or the complications of bogies or valve gear. One of these chassis kits looks like it would be a good introduction to chassis building.

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Ian, there's no reason why you should spend months struggling to get a loco running. Given the range of parts the Association supplies, as long as you can drill holes and solder you can build a working chassis, especially something straightforward like an inside cylinder 0-6-0 which isn't going to have balance issues or the complications of bogies or valve gear. One of these chassis kits looks like it would be a good introduction to chassis building.

 

Best to say accurately drill. I have had a few tribulations with gear meshing over the years, which is why I etch all my stuff now. Not to mention no need to cut out stuff with a piercing saw, at which I was also rubbish.

 

I can build one of these chassis kit from its parts in an hour (excluding the brake gear). Ok, I've had a bit of practice. Everything from then on is the stuff you have to do for every loco, kit or scratch built. Quartering the wheels, fitting the coupling rods, getting everything running smoothly.

 

Chris

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