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Non-railway modelling


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63403650_starchild.jpg.8a066ba61836fd9cce7118b351e3539d.jpg

 

2086140922_starchildinfo.jpg.2047a2a33c937ec0805017ce2258c2e0.jpg

 

This was an original,  quite small, it looked smaller than an actual baby would be, but it was hanging from the roof.   There are contemporary pics on the net of larger star child props though. Apparently they went through a number of  ideas and different versions before they came up with this one.  Liz Moore was an artist and sculptor who also designed c3po for star wars... worth a quick look on wilkipedia etc.

 

I've just come across this site

 

http://www.2001italia.it/2013/05/making-starchild-in-2001-tribute-to-liz.html?m=1

 

which explains how they filmed the star child sequence. And yes this is the actual prop.

That site also explains how they made the 7' by 8' moonbase scenery, by pouring plaster over hessian, a technique not unknown in model railway circles!  It's described as the same techniques used in Space:1999.

Edited by railroadbill
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One thing that has always puzzled me is why so many military modellers seem to concentrate on the (losing) German equipment, as opposed to Allied kit. Is it inherently more interesting technically or something?

 

I did dabble in milmod years ago but kept to softskins, trucks and the like. Mind you, I wasn’t very good...

 

steve

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6 hours ago, steve1 said:

One thing that has always puzzled me is why so many military modellers seem to concentrate on the (losing) German equipment, as opposed to Allied kit. Is it inherently more interesting technically or something?

 

I did dabble in milmod years ago but kept to softskins, trucks and the like. Mind you, I wasn’t very good...

 

steve

My guess would be that it's because the Germans produced a much greater variety of kit, due to the slightly dysfunctional way that their state worked. The Allies tended to stick to a smaller number of designs and produce them in huge numbers. The modeller gets more choice with the Germans. 

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6 hours ago, steve1 said:

One thing that has always puzzled me is why so many military modellers seem to concentrate on the (losing) German equipment, as opposed to Allied kit. Is it inherently more interesting technically or something?

 

I did dabble in milmod years ago but kept to softskins, trucks and the like. Mind you, I wasn’t very good...

 

steve

From a personal point of view, some of the Axis equipment is more interesting, more purposeful. If we take fighter aircraft, as an example, and look at the BF/ME109 and FW190 and line them up beside Spitfires and Hurricanes, we get the impression that the 109 and 190 mean business. The 109, especially, is a war machine through and through, no question.  The Spitfire (and to a lesser extent the Hurricane), with a lineage back to the SE5, whilst it's ability was not in doubt, looks more like it is built for grace first and combat second, at least until we start looking at the Mark 9 and later Griffon-engine examples.  Off the top of my head, the only British aircraft I can think off with the same presence was the Typhoon.  Loaded for Ground attack, it just looks right.  

 

Something similar can be said about armour. There's no doubting Pz.4, 5 and 6 (the Tiger especially) exude strength and power (I'm aware they had their flaws) whereas can the same be said of the Crusader, for instance, or the lumbering Churchill? The Stuart does not look out of place beeing lampooned in  Whacky Races and even the M4 Shrerman looks too short and top heavy, although I'm aware of its effectiveness in the right situation.

 

In the end, for me, it's not about the winners or the losers, it's about the presence.  Mosquito aside, I'm not at all interested in building or displaying the likes of Lancaster or Spitfire (heaven nows we're bombarded with enough of them anyway - what's that Airfix and Eduard, another new tooled Spitfire..? sigh), but a 48th scale DO-17Z-10 and ME-410? Well, yes please!

 

Best

 

Scott.

 

 

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7 hours ago, steve1 said:

One thing that has always puzzled me is why so many military modellers seem to concentrate on the (losing) German equipment, as opposed to Allied kit. Is it inherently more interesting technically or something?

 

I did dabble in milmod years ago but kept to softskins, trucks and the like. Mind you, I wasn’t very good...

 

steve

 

56 minutes ago, pete_mcfarlane said:

My guess would be that it's because the Germans produced a much greater variety of kit, due to the slightly dysfunctional way that their state worked. The Allies tended to stick to a smaller number of designs and produce them in huge numbers. The modeller gets more choice with the Germans. 

A lot of their equipment was obtained from countries that they annexed/invaded. This resulted in a logistical nightmare in obtaining spares for such equipment. Added to that the factories in the occupied countries very rarely worked to full capacity. Also there was a very clever piece of sabotage carried out on every Citroen truck made for the Germans. The full mark on the oil dipstick was moved down a few millimetres meaning that there was insufficient oil in the sump. The Germans never spotted that one. They did however standardize on the Opel Blitz 3 ton truck, examples being turned out by Mercedes amongst others.

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In the earliest days of larger scale (1/35-1/32 and 1/24-1/25) plastic armour kits the main source was Japanese companies, such as Tamiya and Nitto.  Their range was influenced by their home market, for whom the more famous German tanks were the thing to have.  Apart from the late model Sherman there was little Allied armour. By the early 70s there was more variety and Monogram, Italaeri and Esci joined, in closely followed by Airfix and Heller.  These and the Japanese makers rapidly introduced Allied subjects along with Japanese and Italian types.  However, having got into AFV and softskin modelling in 1972, it was clear that a high proportion of modellers concentrated on German types, and there is still strong interest in them.  You can even get models of German types that ended the war as half-built prototypes, or never got off the drawing board.  The sheer variety of different types, marks and sub-types appeals to the 'collector' mentality.

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I think the camouflage marking of Axis model is generally more interesting. Towards the end of the war, as paint to official specifications ran out other types were used. Just look at allied tank camouflage compared to German. Towards the end of the war many US aircraft weren’t even painted, just natural metal.

Robert

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1 minute ago, Erichill16 said:

I think the camouflage marking of Axis model is generally more interesting. Towards the end of the war, as paint to official specifications ran out other types were used. Just look at allied tank camouflage compared to German. Towards the end of the war many US aircraft weren’t even painted, just natural metal.

Robert

That's when you KNOW you've got air superiority.

I have seen an illustration in 'US Aircraft of WW2' of a Liberator designated as a 'Bomber Leader' (or something close to). The colour scheme consisted of cloud-like blobs of yellow and pink, making it look as though it had taking a wrong turn out of Haight-Ashbury . It really ought to have had 'Furthur' painted somewhere on it....

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36 minutes ago, Fat Controller said:

That's when you KNOW you've got air superiority.

I have seen an illustration in 'US Aircraft of WW2' of a Liberator designated as a 'Bomber Leader' (or something close to). The colour scheme consisted of cloud-like blobs of yellow and pink, making it look as though it had taking a wrong turn out of Haight-Ashbury . It really ought to have had 'Furthur' painted somewhere on it....

I don’t think these planes crossed the channel, they were used for identification purposes for the others in the raid to form up with before departing for European. B17s were also used. 

I agree though that natural metal was used due to air superiority.

Robert

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Interesting camo schemes occurred elsewhere.  The Red Army. whose tanks were generally green with optional whitewash in season, came up with this for operations on the Finnish front.

 

A SU 122 self propelled 122mm howitzer.

SU 122 colour.jpg

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1 hour ago, petethemole said:

Interesting camo schemes occurred elsewhere.  The Red Army. whose tanks were generally green with optional whitewash in season, came up with this for operations on the Finnish front.

 

A SU 122 self propelled 122mm howitzer.

SU 122 colour.jpg

 

A "tree-mendous" idea perhaps?

 

steve

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Going back to the earlier discussion, I've build 8 AFVs and 7 of them have been German (although two were modern), only one, a Challenger 1, was not...

 

A Panzer IV of mine built a few years ago:

 

PZIV-1-1024x768.jpg.b90d67fea2d9769c8254501d56ad83d5.jpg

 

PZIV-5-1024x768.jpg.5f744db9bdb54e72b9a7c4151561d131.jpg

 

PZIV-11-1024x768.jpg.e77d68af2a62a4048f79827e3c64989f.jpg

 

John

 

Edited by johndon
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Apart from the excellent finish and the detail (really like the toolbox) what caught me on this is the guy on the turret with binoculars, scanning the sky. It gives a real feeling of danger, enemy aircraft can't be far away and they must finish the repairs very quickly. Terrific!

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On 06/01/2021 at 20:31, steve1 said:

 

A "tree-mendous" idea perhaps?

 

steve

 

Birch-ually invisible from any distance, I'd say.  Clearly inspired by a dodgy translation of Shakespeare:

 

But when the blast of war blows in our ears,

Then imitate the action of the Taiga:

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